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Comprehensive Plan
2019-2040




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Capital Improvements

GOAL

PROVIDE AND MAINTAIN, IN A TIMELY AND EFFICIENT MANNER, ADEQUATE PUBLIC FACILITIES FOR BOTH EXISTING AND FUTURE POPULATIONS, CONSISTENT WITH AVAILABLE FINANCIAL RESOURCES.

OBJECTIVE 1.1

Coordinate the timing and location of capital improvement projects with improvement projects of other agencies and jurisdictions and ensure that the Capital Improvements Element (CIE) is consistent with other elements of the Comprehensive Plan.

Policy 1.1.1     Alachua County shall coordinate capital improvements with the plans for, and impacts of capital improvements proposed by State agencies and the Suwannee River and St. John's River Water Management Districts.

Policy 1.1.2     Alachua County shall coordinate the timing and location of capital improvement projects with improvement projects of the municipalities in Alachua County, the School Board of Alachua County, the Alachua County Library District, the Regional Transit System (RTS), the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), and surrounding counties. This shall be implemented as follows:

As part of the updates of the Capital Improvements Program (CIP), and Capital Budget, capital improvement plans of local agencies relevant to the facilities provided in Alachua County's CIE and CIP shall be identified and analyzed.  This analysis may be in the form of maps identifying existing facilities, planned improvements for the upcoming fiscal year, five-year plans and the 2040 Multi-Modal Transportation Capital Improvement Program.  In turn, Alachua County shall provide information concerning the timing, location, and design of proposed capital improvements by the County to these entities and shall maintain a data base on facilities affecting or affected by facilities provided by the County.

Policy 1.1.3     The Capital Improvements Element shall be consistent with the North Central Florida Strategic Regional Policy Plan and the State Comprehensive Plan.

Policy 1.1.4     All public facility improvements shall be consistent with the other elements of the Comprehensive Plan.  This shall be implemented by including for all projects in the Capital Improvement Program, an analysis of consistency with the Comprehensive Plan.

Policy 1.1.5     Alachua County shall annually adopt and implement a financially feasible Capital Improvements Program which identifies and coordinates the timing of capital projects needed to maintain the adopted levels of service identified in the Comprehensive Plan.

OBJECTIVE 1.2

Alachua County shall define types of public facilities and establish the standards or guidelines for level of service (LOS) by facility type to be used in developing and updating the five year capital improvement program and the 2040 Multi-Modal Transportation Capital Improvement Program to implement this element.

Policy 1.2.1     Public facilities are classified in the following manner:

(a)          Category "A" public facilities are storm water management systems, solid waste, and recreation facilities owned and operated by the County, and are addressed in other elements of this Comprehensive Plan;

(b)         Category "B" public facilities are arterial and collector roads,  bicycle facilities, pedestrian facilities, transit facilities, storm water management systems, potable water, sanitary sewer, public schools, and recreation  facilities located in the unincorporated area of the County, owned and operated by other entities including Federal and State government or other jurisdictions or private providers in Alachua County.

(c)          Category "C" public facilities are arterial and collector roads,  bicycle facilities, pedestrian facilities, transit facilities, correctional, emergency medical services, fire services, sheriff, preservation lands, and other governmental facilities owned and operated by the County.

Policy 1.2.2     Alachua County shall maintain adopted LOS standards for Category "A" public facilities and include the capital improvements to Category "A" public facilities in the Capital Improvements Program (CIP) or 2030 Multi-Modal Transportation Capital Improvement Program.  Procedures are included in the development regulations to ensure that adequate facilities to maintain level of service standards on those facilities in the unincorporated area of the County will be available concurrent with the impacts of new development subject to approval by the County as defined in Policy 1.3.2 (a-c).  Pursuant to Section 163.3167(2), Florida Statutes, no final development order or permit which contains a specific plan for development, including the densities and intensities of development, shall be approved by Alachua County without a prior determination that this concurrency requirement will be met.

Policy 1.2.3     Alachua County shall maintain adopted LOS standards for Category "B" public facilities and shall review planned improvements to these facilities as part of the annual update of the Capital Improvements Program.  Procedures shall be included in the development regulations to ensure that adequate facilities to maintain level of service standards will be available concurrent with the impacts of development as defined in Policy 1.3.2 (a-c).  Pursuant to Section 163.3167(2), no final development order or permit which contains a specific plan for development, including the densities and intensities of development, shall be approved without a determination that this concurrency requirement will be met.

Policy 1.2.4     LOS standards for Category "A" and "B" public facilities shall be as follows:

(a)          Recreation LOS Standards: The County shall adopt and maintain, at a minimum, the following level of service standards for recreation of: (1) 0.5 acres of improved activity-based recreation sites per 1000 persons in the unincorporated area of Alachua County; (2) 5.0 acres of improved resource-based recreation sites per 1000 persons in the unincorporated area of Alachua County.

(b)         The level of service (LOS) standard for solid waste disposal, used as the basis for determining availability of disposal capacity to accommodate the demand generated by existing and new development in Alachua County, is at a minimum, at 0.8 inbound tons per person per year at the Leveda Brown Environmental Park in 2018 and thereafter.

(c)          Stormwater Management LOS Standards (based on Stormwater Management Element: Policy 3.1.1)

Facility

Level of Service

Residential floor elevation

1 foot above the 100 year/critical-duration storm elevation

Non-residential floor elevation

1 foot above 100 year/critical-duration storm elevation or flood resistant construction

Water Quantity

 

Retention basins

100 year/ critical-duration storm or applicable Water Management District standards

Detention basins

25 year/critical-duration storm with 100 year/critical-duration   storm  routing analysis

Storm sewer systems

3 year/10 minute

Crossdrains

10/25 year/24hr. storm for closed system 100 Year/24hr for open system

Sidedrains

10 year/20 minute

*"Critical-duration" means the duration of a specific storm event (i.e., 100-year storm) which creates the largest volume or highest rate of net stormwater runoff (post-development runoff less pre-development runoff) for typical durations up through and including the 10-day duration event.  The critical duration is determined by comparing various durations of the specified storm and calculating the peak rate and volume of runoff for each.  The duration resulting in the highest peak rate or largest total volume is the "critical-duration" storm.

Water Quality

Water Quality treatment criteria for new or  modifications to existing facilities shall be provided in accordance with State Water Policy and the applicable local, Water Management District, state and federal requirements.

 

(d)         Potable Water and Sewer LOS Standards (based on Potable Water and Sanitary Sewer Element).  The following level of service standards for potable water and sanitary sewer service in the unincorporated portion of Alachua County are hereby adopted, and shall be used as the basis for determining the availability of facility capacity, adequate water supply, and the demand generated by a development within the appropriate service area for the providers listed below for purposes of issuing development orders or building permits.

Potable Water

 

 

Raw Water Supply:

Average Daily Flow

Treatment Capacity:

Daily Flow

Pumping and Distribution Capacity:

Peak hourly flow

Storage capacity:

One-half of peak day volume in gallons.  This requirement may be met by a combination of storage and auxiliary power.

Minimum pressure:

The system shall be designed for a minimum pressure of 40 psig under forecasted peak hourly demands to assure 20 psig under extreme and unforeseen conditions.

Fire demand:

As determined using Insurance Services Organization guidelines

Potable Water:

 

Average Day (gross)

124.5 gallons per capita per day (including residential and non-residential uses)

Peak Day (gross):

200 gallons per capita per day (including residential and non-residential uses)

Sanitary Sewerage

 

Collection System:

Peak Hourly Flow (2.5 times the average daily flow)

Treatment and Disposal:

Annual average daily flow which allows for anticipated peak hour flow

Sanitary Sewerage:

 

Average Day (gross)

106 gallons per capita per day

For private package treatment plants, community water systems, and non-community water systems, the level of service standards shall be the minimum design and operating standards as established by the authorized local, regional, water management district, state, or federal regulatory agency.

 

(e)          Public Schools LOS Standard (based on Public School Facilities Element)

 

The uniform, district-wide LOS standards shall be 100% of Program Capacity [see definition] for elementary, middle and high schools. This LOS standard shall apply to all concurrency service areas (CSA) as adopted in the Interlocal Agreement.  These LOS standards shall be applied to School Concurrency Service Areas (SCSAs) as specified in the Public School Facilities Element.

 

Policy 1.2.5     Alachua County shall adopt LOS guidelines for Category "C" public facilities, and include those facilities in the CIP.  These LOS guidelines are to be used for analysis and identification of Capital Improvement Project needs for these facilities to be included in the Capital Improvement Program.  The LOS guidelines for Category "C" public facilities are the following:

(a)          Fire LOS guidelines are as follows:

(1)         In the Urban Cluster, initial unit response LOS guideline is within 6 minutes for 80% of all emergency responses within a 12 month period.  Land development regulations shall require that 100% of development shall provide water supply served by hydrants.

(2)         In the rural area, initial unit response LOS guideline is within 12 minutes for 80% of all emergency responses within a 12 month period.  Fire suppression/protection service level for all properties in the Rural Area shall be at the ISO (Insurance Service Office) Class Protection of <10. Development will provide adequate water supply for fire suppression and protection, and fire service compliant fire connections, required through land development regulations.

(3)         The County shall periodically update the Alachua County Fire and Emergency Medical Services Master Plan, including an evaluation of capital and related operational needs to meet the Fire LOS guidelines identified in this policy and consideration of service delivery benchmarks for Emergency Medical Services (EMS).  Updates of the Master Plan shall include identification of funding sources that could be established as part of a financially feasible plan to meet these LOS guidelines. The Fire and Emergency Medical Services Master Plan shall serve as a basis for consideration of an amendment to the Comprehensive Plan to establish level of service standards for Fire Rescue services and Emergency Medical Services as part of the County’s concurrency management requirements.

(b)         Jail space - LOS guidelines based on trends in population growth and composition, crime rate and related factors including but not limited to state and national incarceration rates.  LOS guidelines for alternatives to jail such as Work Release and various forms of community supervision should increase in a proportion equal to or exceeding increases in Jail space.

(c)          Government buildings and facilities - LOS guidelines based on Alachua County Master Space Plan adopted by the Board of County Commissioners on June 13, 1995, and any amendments thereto.  Facilities shall incorporate and recognize urban design principles.  Life cycle costs shall be considered in the design and construction of government facilities, and the analysis shall be presented to the Board for consideration.  The County shall implement an Energy Conservation Plan including a program to track the use of energy and water in facilities owned by the County and reducing energy consumption as it relates to budgetary constraints.  The County shall require energy efficient retrofits of existing facilities and will ensure energy efficient objectives are met in the planning and construction of any new facilities.

(d)         Preservation lands - Preservation lands shall be prioritized for public acquisition consistent with Section 6 of the Conservation and Open Space Element.  A level of service guideline for preservation lands shall be developed as part of the land conservation master plan addressed in Objective 6.1 of the Conservation and Open Space Element.

(e)          Multi-modal transportation level of service (LOS) guidelines shall be as follows:

 

Level of Service (LOS)

Standard of Measure

Pedestrian

B

Based on Presence of a pedestrian facility

Bicycle

B

Based on Presence of a bike lanes / paved shoulders

Express Transit

B

Based on Peak Hour Frequency of 15 minutes or less

Motor Vehicle- Urban*

D

Professionally Accepted Traffic Analysis (Areawide)

Motor Vehicle -Rural

C

Professionally Accepted Traffic Analysis

*             Standard applies to Collector and Arterial Roads

(1)         In order to achieve the level of service guideline for pedestrians and bicyclists, the facility shall run the entire length of the roadway segment.  A pedestrian facility shall be either a multi-use path on one (1) side of the roadway or sidewalks on both sides of the roadway. A multi-use path along a roadway shall result in a LOS B for bicyclists. The LOS for bicycle and pedestrian travel is the goal for all collector and arterial roadways within the Urban Cluster by 2040, not a standard that is intended to be achieved on an annual basis for each roadway.

(2)         Express Transit Service shall be provided for a minimum of two (2) hours during both the AM and PM peak periods. The LOS for Express Transit Service shall be a goal achieved within the Urban Cluster on each of the four (4) routes shown on the Express Transit Corridors map by 2040. The peak hour frequency for each route shall be a minimum of 30 minutes and may be extended to add additional service to meet demand and maintain up to fifteen (15) minute headways based on the capacity and productivity of the Service. 

(3)         Within each Urban Transportation Mobility District, achievement of the LOS for all functionally classified roadways shall be based on an Areawide LOS. The Areawide LOS shall be determined by dividing the sum (∑) of total traffic by the sum (∑) of the total maximum service volume at the adopted LOS standard for all functionally classified roadways.

(f)          Alachua County shall adopt guidelines for roads functionally classified as local, as indicated below:

(1)         The land development regulations shall include standards, criteria, and procedures to ensure that an adequate system of roads functionally classified as local provides safe and maintainable multi-modal access to new development that will use such roads.  These regulations shall include design standards to ensure that the structural integrity and volume capacity of such roads are adequate based on projected trips to and from such development and shall take into account requirements for fire-fighting and other emergency and service vehicle access. Evaluation and approval of new development proposals shall include assessment of impact on and capacity of directly connected existing local roads.

(2)         The land development regulations shall include guidelines, standards, and procedures for the identification of existing local graded roads providing access to existing development that are deficient based on findings that the condition of such roads is below or is projected to be below that required to meet minimum standards for public safety based on factors such as accidents, indications of inaccessibility to emergency and service vehicles, indications of inability to properly maintain, and projected traffic volumes in relation to the condition of the road.  A management program for such roads identified as deficient shall be developed by the County Public Works Department for consideration as part of the annual Capital Improvements Program update. This shall include identification of the cost of required maintenance or modifications necessary to remedy identified deficiencies, identification of existing or proposed sources of funding such expenditures, and identification of areas proposed for deferral of further development pending remedy of existing local road deficiencies. (based on Transportation Mobility Element Policy 1.1.3(b)).

OBJECTIVE 1.3

Maintenance of adopted LOS standards to meet existing and future facility needs by coordinating land use decisions with a schedule of capital improvements.

Policy 1.3.1     Require all public facilities constructed in unincorporated Alachua County, to be consistent with the Capital Improvements Element and the Comprehensive Plan.

Policy 1.3.2     Require Category "A" and "B" public facilities and services needed to support development to be available concurrent with the impacts of development and require issuance of a Certificate of Level of Service Compliance (CLSC) as a condition of all final development orders.  "Concurrent" shall mean that all adopted LOS S4andards shall be maintained or be achieved within a reasonable time frame as set out in 1.3.2 (A-D) below.  Failure to receive a Certificate of Level of Service Compliance will preclude the issuance of any final development order on the project or project phase, until the requirements of 1.3.2 (A-D) have been satisfied.

(a)          For potable water, sewerage, solid waste and storm water management, the following standards must be met to satisfy the concurrency requirement and to receive a Certificate of Level of Service Compliance:

(1)         The necessary facilities and services are in place at the time a development permit is issued; or

(2)         A development permit is issued subject to the condition that the necessary facilities will be in place when the impacts of development occur; or

(3)         The necessary facilities are under construction at the time a development permit is issued and will be in place when the impacts of development occur; or

(4)         The necessary facilities and services are guaranteed in an enforceable development agreement that includes the provisions of Policy 1.3.2(a-c).  An enforceable development agreement may include, but is not limited to: (1) development agreements pursuant to section 163.3220, Florida Statutes, or (2) an agreement or development order issued pursuant to Chapter 380, Florida Statutes.  Any such agreement must guarantee that the necessary facilities and services will be in place when the impacts of development occur.

(b)         For recreation, the concurrency requirement may be satisfied by:

(1)         Compliance with the requirements of 1.3.2-A(1-4); or

(2)         At the time the development permit is issued, the necessary facilities and services are the subject of a binding executed contract which provides for the commencement of actual construction of the required facilities or the provision of services within one year of the issuance of the development permit; or

(3)         The necessary facilities and services are guaranteed in an enforceable development agreement which requires commencement of construction of the facilities within one year of the issuance of the applicable development permit.  Such enforceable development agreements may include, but are not limited to, development agreements pursuant to Section 163.3220, Florida Statutes, or an agreement or development order issued pursuant to Chapter 380, Florida Statutes.

(c)          For public schools, the concurrency requirement may be satisfied by:

(1)         Adequate school facilities will be in place or under construction within three years, as provided in the School Board 5-Year District Facilities Work Plan for School Concurrency adopted as part of this element, after the issuance of the final development order; or,

(2)         Adequate school facilities are available in an adjacent SCSA, and when adequate capacity at adopted LOS Standards will be in place or under construction in the adjacent SCSA within three years, as provided in the School Board 5-Year District Facilities Work Plan for School Concurrency, after the issuance of the final development order; or,

(3)         The developer executes a legally binding commitment to provide mitigation proportionate to the demand for public school facilities to be created by development of the property subject to the final development order as provided in the Public School Facilities Element.

Policy 1.3.3     The Concurrency Management System (CMS) shall include at a minimum the following components:

(a)          Procedures for issuance of a Certificate of Level of Service Compliance (CLSC) as a condition of Final Development Orders.

(b)         Use of the five-year Capital Improvements Program which shall (1) be financially feasible based on currently available revenue sources, and (2) include both necessary facilities to maintain adopted level of service standards to serve new development and the necessary facilities required to eliminate existing deficiencies which are a priority to be eliminated during the five year Capital Improvement Program planning period.

(c)          Determination that the capital project funds are programmed in the CIP (see 1.6.5).

OBJECTIVE 1.4

Management of the land development and capital improvements programming processes so that public facility needs do not exceed Alachua County's ability to fund and provide needed capital improvements identified in the other elements of this plan.

Policy 1.4.1     Alachua County shall address the Capital Improvements Program including existing deficiencies needs as part of the annual budgeting process. This shall include: 

(a)          Evaluation of backlog of deficiencies,  current, short-range, and long range  needs for infrastructure including needs to maintain adopted LOS standards for transportation, recreation and open space, solid waste, storm water management, and potable water and sanitary sewerage.

(b)       Update of the County’s 5 year Capital Improvements Program and 2030 Multi-Modal Transportation Capital Improvement Program.

(c)       Evaluation of, and necessary adjustment to, adopted LOS standards as part of twice a year Comprehensive Plan Amendment cycle based in part on availability of funding, and information from the development monitoring system.

(d)       Identification of changes to the Capital Improvements Element regarding funding and expenditures consistent with adopted or newly adjusted LOS standards.

(e)          Identification of necessary amendments to other elements of the Comprehensive Plan.

(f)          Establishment of policy direction for the final operating and capital budget affected by capital improvements.

(g)          Identification of long range capital needs through a twenty year capital projects list.

Policy 1.4.2     Maximize use of joint venture solutions to mutual capital facility needs experienced by Alachua County government, other state and local entities, and private enterprise, including solutions utilizing local governments’ development agreements as described in 163.3220-163.3243, F.S.

Policy 1.4.3     Provide incentives and otherwise direct the land development process in a way that maximizes use of existing public facilities, particularly those facilities that have the capacity to maintain adopted LOS standards. 

Policy 1.4.4     Within the Future Land Use Element, designate those areas within which priority will be given to provision of public facility improvement needed to address LOS deficiencies to serve new development needs, and provide for density and intensity of development within those areas consistent with this priority.

OBJECTIVE 1.5

Establish priorities for capital improvement projects in a manner that achieves and maintains adopted LOS standards, addresses future growth and remedies existing deficiencies within the shortest time frame possible consistent with fiscal capacity and priorities adopted for elimination of deficiencies, while maintaining and protecting the County's investment in existing capital facilities.

Policy 1.5.1     The capital improvements needed to repair, renovate, or replace obsolete or worn out facilities shall be determined by the Board of County Commissioners upon the recommendation of the County Manager.

Policy 1.5.2     Alachua County shall set the relative priorities for improvement projects within types of public facilities as:

(a)          Capital improvements to be funded with a funding source other than impact fees shall be evaluated in accordance with the criteria listed below.  Projects eligible for the use of impact fees shall be evaluated consistent with Policy 1.8.2.

(1)         Priority 1 - The repair, remodeling, renovation, or replacement of obsolete or worn out facilities that contribute to achieving or maintaining adopted LOS standards.

(2)       Priority 2 - New public facilities and improvements or modifications to existing public facilities that eliminate or mitigate public natural, societal or technological hazards, ranked according to the Project List in the approved Local Mitigation Strategy.

(3)         Priority 3 - New public facilities and improvements or modifications to existing public facilities that are needed to maintain health, safety, and welfare. 

(4)       Priority 4 -New public facilities or improvements to existing public facilities that are required by contractual obligation or legal mandates.

(5)         Priority 5 - New and expanded facilities that reduce or eliminate deficiencies relative to LOS standards for existing demands.  Projects to address deficiencies to serve existing development or approved vested development in urban service areas designated in the Future Land Use Element shall have priority within this category.

(6)         Priority 6 - New or expanded facilities, including land acquisition, that are needed to maintain adopted LOS for new development and redevelopment during the next five years.  Projects to serve new development within urban service areas designated in the Future Land Use Element shall have priority within this category.

(7)         In the event that capacity of public facilities is insufficient to serve all applicants for development orders, the priorities shall be as follows:

a.             Capital Improvements to serve DRIs and vested (i.e., where development has commenced and is continuing in good faith) final development orders issued prior to plan adoption.  Criteria to rank the following shall be established in the Concurrency Ordinance:  Projects subject to development agreements.  Final development orders not vested.  Non-final development orders. Other categories of development based on the Comprehensive Plan policies.

OBJECTIVE 1.6

Programming and funding of capital projects consistent with the Goals, Objectives, and Policies of the Comprehensive Plan and Future Land Use Map, to maintain adopted LOS standards, and/or meet other public facility needs, including equity objectives, not dictated by LOS standards.

Policy 1.6.1     Establish an annual Capital Improvement Review process, with appropriate citizen participation, to:

(a)        Document recent development activity in Alachua County and municipalities within the County and identify additional capital improvement needs generated by this development activity.

(b)         Evaluate current levels of service for each facility type.

(c)     Adjust population and employment projections to reevaluate locational needs and adjust public facility needs as necessary.

(d)         Recommend major and minor modifications to the Capital Improvement Program list based on the annual review.

Policy 1.6.2     Fund all capital improvements identified in the CIP within the time frames specified.

Policy 1.6.3     Annually adopt a Capital Budget consistent with the Capital Improvements Program.

Policy 1.6.4     Establish appropriate capital project funds to implement the CIP and Capital Budget.  These funds shall be comprised of various funding sources from which appropriate capital funding shall be derived.  Alachua County shall annually review existing funding sources and consider alternative funding sources for the Capital Project Funds.

Policy 1.6.5     Where possible, the County shall use specialized revenue sources corresponding to the type of facility provided (i.e., gas tax for road modifications).

Policy 1.6.6     Utilize ad valorem millage as the revenue of last resort to fund items shown for which insufficient specialized sources of revenue are available. However, ad valorem millage should be adjusted on an annual basis to obtain funding for projects where no other revenues are available to fund those projects.

Policy 1.6.7     Adequately address financing for major public facility needs not related to maintaining an adopted level of service standard, including projects from the adopted Alachua County Local Mitigation Strategy.  Those needs should be addressed annually during the update of the Capital Improvement Program.

Policy 1.6.8     Creative methods for achieving protection of preservation lands shall be used where appropriate. Funding for the Alachua County Forever program shall be as specified in Conservation and Open Space Objective 6.2.

Policy 1.6.9     A land conservation program for the purchase, preservation, and management of natural areas and open space shall be established according to Conservation and Open Space Element Section 6.

Policy 1.6.10  Maximum utilization of user fees, intergovernmental transfers, and other funding sources shall be utilized to limit reliance on local ad valorem revenues for funding capital improvements.

Policy 1.6.11  Ensure public sector's implementation of the Comprehensive Plan by the timely and efficient provision of public facilities.

Policy 1.6.12  Alachua County shall consider a Sustainability Index for use in assessing proposed capital projects.

Policy 1.6.13  Alachua County shall consider life cycle costs in decisions on capital projects.

Policy 1.6.14  Address disparities as identified in “Understanding Racial Inequity In Alachua County” (BEBR, 2018) as a factor in decisions on capital improvement projects.

OBJECTIVE 1.7

Cautious use of long term financing to implement certain major capital projects.

Policy 1.7.1     When the County finances projects through the issuance of bonds, it will pay back the bonds within a period not to exceed the useful life of the project, but in no event to exceed 30 years. The County will issue long-term debt only for the purposes of constructing or acquiring capital improvements or for making major renovations to existing capital facilities.

Policy 1.7.2     All County debt shall be subject to County budget and financial policies including requirements for financing, maturity limitations, general debt limitations, debt issuance restrictions, refunding, disclosure requirements, arbitrage reporting, investment of bond proceeds, and short-term and interim financing.

Policy 1.7.3     The County shall establish a debt management policy.  Decisions on debt issuance shall take into account factors such as:

(a)          Legal constraints on debt capacity and various financing alternatives.

(b)         Constraints contained in currently outstanding debt documents.

(c)          The urgency of the capital requirements to be met and the economic costs of delays.

(d)         Willingness and financial ability of taxpayers to pay for the capital improvements.

(e)          Proper balance between internal and external financing.

(f)          Current interest rates and other market considerations.

(g)          The financial condition of the County.

(h)         The types, availability, and stability of revenues to be pledged for repayment of the debt.

(i)           Type of debt to be issued.

(j)           The nature of the projects to be financed and whether or not the project to be financed is self-supporting.

Policy 1.7.4     The County shall not construct or acquire a public facility using debt financing if it is unable to adequately provide for the identifiable annual operation and maintenance costs of the facility, or the County shall disclose the limitation on the ability to meet such costs.

OBJECTIVE 1.8

Explore the full range of possible revenue sources to address capital improvement needs.

Policy 1.8.1     The County shall investigate potential new funding sources including user fees, impact fees, mobility fees, multi-modal transportation fees, transportation utility fees, gas taxes, storm water utility fees, ad valorem tax revenues, special assessments, Community Development Districts and other sources allowed by law.

Policy 1.8.2     Alachua County may use impact fees, mobility fees, multi-modal transportation fees, transportation utility fees, backlog authorities, dedications, and exactions, among other means consistent with legal standards, to ensure that owners and developers of future development projects will provide or pay for capital improvements, for public facilities, necessary to address the impacts of the development.

Policy 1.8.3     The County shall utilize current funding sources and identify, as part of the Recreation Master Plan, appropriate new funding sources (e.g., utility tax, user fees, benefit districts and special assessments) for the provision of recreation site maintenance and operations.   New funding mechanisms such as user fees at County parks shall be structured so that accessibility to low-income individuals is affirmatively enhanced.

Policy 1.8.4     Alachua County shall expand the availability of recreational opportunities by seeking agreements with recreational facility and program providers to serve multi-jurisdictional areas based on the findings of the Recreation Master Plan. These agreements shall address issues that include provision of operations and maintenance, capital improvements and capital funding liabilities and other appropriate issues. The County shall implement the most efficient and effective use of public funds to provide comprehensive recreation programs and opportunities for the public. The County shall contract with public or private organizations for such services where it has been demonstrated that they provide the most beneficial recreational programs.

OBJECTIVE 1.9

Limit capital improvements that may directly or indirectly, through accompanying development, degrade environmentally sensitive areas or other natural resources important to health, safety, and welfare of the citizens and environment of Alachua County.  These resources are identified in the Conservation and Open Space Element and  include but are not limited to: preservation areas and conservation areas such as  wetlands, surface waters, well field protection areas, listed species habitat, significant geological  features,  strategic ecosystems,  flood plains, areas containing designated specimen and champion trees, County-designated scenic corridors, mineral resources, and aquifer recharge areas.

Policy 1.9.1     The principles and policies of the Conservation and Open Space Element shall be a primary factor in decision-making concerning new or expanded public facilities, as established in Objective 1.2 of the Conservation and Open Space Element.

Policy 1.9.2     An inventory of natural resources and analysis of potential impacts upon those resources shall be required for all projects that are proposed for inclusion in the capital improvements program.  The inventory and analysis shall be conducted according to the procedures as outlined in Policy 3.4.1.of the Conservation and Open Space Element.

Policy 1.9.3     All capital improvement projects shall be located, designed, constructed, and maintained to avoid, minimize, and mitigate adverse impacts to preservation and conservation areas in accordance with Objective 3.6 of the Conservation and Open Space Element.

Policy 1.9.4     Appropriate conservation, arboricultural, and horticultural standards shall be used in the design, construction, and maintenance of capital improvement projects in order to promote energy conservation, enhance habitat connectivity, provide for the safe passage of wildlife, and improve scenic quality, consistent with Objectives 5.3 and 5.4 of the Conservation and Open Space Element.

OBJECTIVE 1.10

To establish the process for creation of a Transportation Improvement District (TID) for Urban  Transportation Mobility Districts, consistent with the County’s home rule authority. Any Transportation Improvement District Plan (TIDP) adopted by the Board of County Commissioners shall be consistent with the Capital Improvements Element. The following policies establish the process for adoption of a Transportation Improvement District Plan (TIDP) within the Urban Transportation Mobility Districts as part of future updates to the Capital Improvements Element.

Policy 1.10.1  A Transportation Improvement District (TID) may be established within any portion of the Urban Transportation Mobility Districts to fund multi-modal transportation.

Policy 1.10.2  A Transportation Improvement District Plan (TIDP) shall be developed for each TID and shall include the following elements:

(a)          Designated Transportation Improvement District (TID)

(b)         Proposed multi-modal transportation projects, including transit service

(c)          Access and Corridor Management modifications

(d)         Local roadway connectivity plan

(e)          Projected development and revenue

(f)          Projected tax and multi-modal transportation fee revenue generated

Policy 1.10.3  A TID proposed for development within a Transportation Concurrency Exception Area shall be required to include in the TIDP mitigation in the form of phased frequent transit service along rapid transit corridors that connects the TID with a centrally located transit hub on the University of Florida campus, the Downtown transit transfer station and the Eastside Activity Center. Phased transit service shall be as follows: 

(a)          Phase 1: AM and PM peak hour headways of 20 minutes for a span of service of 4 hours and off-peak headways of 40 minutes for a span of service of 6 hours.

(b)        Phase 2: AM, afternoon and PM peak hour headways of 15 minutes for a span of service of 6 hours and off-peak headways of 30 minutes for a span of service of 8 hours.

(c)          Phase 3: AM, afternoon and PM peak hour headways of 10 minutes for a span of service of 8 hours, off-peak headways of 20 minutes for a span of service of 6 hours and early morning and late evening off-peak headways of 30 minutes for a span of service of 4 hours.

Policy 1.10.4  The TIDP shall be adopted by reference under this policy and shall include the title and date of the TID. The following are the adopted TID:

(a)          Reserved,

(b)         Reserved,

(c)          Reserved,

(d)         Reserved.

Policy 1.10.5  Any TIDP adopted by the Board of County Commissioners shall be included as part of the annual update of the Capital Improvements Element.

Table 1a. Multi-modal Transportation Capital Improvements for Fiscal Year 2019-2020 to Fiscal Year 2039-2040 – Roadways and Dedicated Transit Lanes 

 

Project Name-Location

Project Description

Project Length

Mobility District

Funding Source

FY 2020-2024

FY 2025-2029

FY 2030-2039

Ft. Clarke Blvd from Newberry Road to NW 23rd Ave

2 Dedicated Transit Lanes

0.5

NW

(2)

$660,940

 

 

NW 23rd Avenue from NW 59th Terrace to NW 83rd

Widen to 3 lane complete street

1.4

NW

(1)

$6,984,641

 

 

NW 23rd Avenue from NW 83rd to Ft. Clarke

Widen to 4 lanes, including bridge over I-75 + Transit Pre-emption Provisions

0.5

NW

(1)

 

$17,000,000

 

NW 23rd Avenue from Ft. Clarke to NW 98th St

Widen to 4 lanes

0.4

NW

(1)

 

$2,260,433

 

NW 23rd Avenue Extension from NW 98th St to NW 122nd St Extension

New Construction, 2 lanes

1.3

NW

(1)

 

 

$3,292,126

NW 23rd Avenue Extension from NW 122nd St to CR 241 (NW 143rd St)

New Construction, 2 lanes

1.5

NW

(1)

 

 

$3,798,607

NW 83rd Street  from NW 39th Ave to NW 23rd St

2 Dedicated Transit Lanes

1

NW

(2)

$2,532,400

 

 

NW 83rd Street from NW 39th Ave to NW 46th Avenue

New roadway + 2 Dedicated Transit Lanes

0.4

NW

(2)

$3,426,330

 

 

NW 83rd Street Ext from Millhopper Road to Santa Fe Northern Boundary

New 2 lane roadway

0.75

NW

(2)

 

$1,899,300

 

NW 46th Avenue from NW 83rd St Ext to NW 91St Ext

New  roadway + 2 Dedicated Transit Lanes

0.4

NW

(2)

 

$3,426,330

 

NW 46th Avenue from NW 91st St Ext to NW 98th St Ext

New 4 lane roadway + 2 Dedicated Transit Lanes & Bridge over I-75

0.9

NW

(2)

 

$15,000,000

 

NW 46th Avenue  from NW 98th Ext to NW 115th Ext

New Construction, 2 lanes + Dedicated Transit Lane

0.6

NW

(1)

 

$3,245,584

 

NW 91st St Extension from Terminus to NW 46th Ext

New Construction, 4 lanes

0.25

NW

(2)

 

$2,141,460

 

NW 98th Street Extension from NW 39th to NW 46th Avenue

New Construction, 4 lanes

0.25

NW

(2)

 

$2,141,460

 

Newberry Road (SR 26) from I-75 to NW 109th Drive

Dedicated Transit Lane in median + signal upgrade

2.4

NW

(1), (3)

 

$5,410,454

 

Newberry Road (SR 26) from NW 109th Drive to CR 241 (NW 143rd)

Dedicated Transit Lane in median + resurface & signal upgrade

1.9

NW

(1), (3)

 

$4,366,610

 

NW 115th St from NW 39th Ave to NW 46th Ave

New Construction, 2 lanes + Dedicated Transit Lane

0.25

NW

(1)

 

$1,500,000

 

NW 122nd St / 115th St  from  Newberry Road to NW 39th Ave

New Construction, 2 lanes + Dedicated Transit Lane

2.3

NW

(1)

 

 

$12,000,000

SW 122nd St from  Newberry Road to SW 8th Ave

Dedicated Transit Lane

1

NW

(1)

 

$2,000,000

 

Total Projected Cost - NW District

 

 

 

 

$9,517,041

$60,391,631

$19,090,733

SW 20th Ave I-75 Bridge from SW 62nd Ave to SW 52nd Ave

 Widen, 4 lanes with bridge over    I-75

0.5

SW

(1), (3)

$14,000,000

 

 

SW 91st Street / SW 73rd Ave Extension from Archer Road to SW 88th St

New Construction, 2 lane road

0.3

SW

(2)

$759,720

 

 

Archer Road from SW 75th St to SW 45th St

Dedicated Transit Lane + signal upgrade

2

 SW

(1), (3)

 

$4,175,380

 

Archer Road from SW 75th Terr to SW 91st St

Widen, 4 lanes + Dedicated Transit Lane

1.25

 SW

(1), (3)

 

$6,723,960

 

New Road South and Parallel to Archer Road SW 63rd to Archer Road

New Construction, 2 lanes

1.5

 SW

(1), (2)

 

$4,611,930

 

SW 57th Road from SW 75th to SW 63rd

New Construction, 2 lanes

1.4

 SW

(1), (2)

 

 

$4,304,470

SW 63rd/ SW 67th Ave from SW 24th Ave to Archer Road

New Construction, 2 lanes

1.9

 SW

(1), (2)

 

 

$10,885,230

SW 91st St from SW 46th to Archer Road

Dedicated Transit Lane

1

 SW

(1)

 

 

$2,087,690

SW 122nd St from SW 8th Ave to SW 37th Ave

Dedicated Transit Lane

1.75

SW

(1)

 

$3,250,000

 

Total Projected Cost - SW District

 

 

 

 

$14,000,000

$18,761,270

$17,277,390

Hawthorne Road from SE 27th to SE 43rd

Dedicated Transit Lanes (Reconfigure existing roadway, add multi-use path)

1.1

 E

(1), (3)

 

$1,454,066

 

Total Projected Cost - E District

 

 

 

 

 

$1,454,066

 

Dollar figures are estimates of project costs. Funding Sources (1) Local Sources (2) Developer Funded (3) Non-local Sources

Table 1b. Multi-modal Transportation Capital Improvements for Fiscal Year 2019-2020 to Fiscal Year 2039-2040 – Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities

Project Name-Location

Project Description

Project Length

Mobility District

Funding Source

FY 2020-2024

FY  2025-2029

FY 2030-2039

W. University Ave from SW 75th St to East Terminus

Sidewalk facility

0.5

NW

(1), (2), (3)

$230,000

 

 

NW 143rd St (CR 241) from Newberry Road to NW 39th Ave

Multiuse off-road facility

1.5

NW

(1), (2), (3)

$600,000

 

 

NW 76th Dr from Tower Road to Tower Road

6 ft. Sidewalk

0.4

NW

(2)

$225,000

 

 

NW 75th Dr from NW 76th Dr to W University Ave

6 ft. Sidewalk

0.2

NW

(2)

$110,000

 

 

NW 76th Blvd from W University Ave to Skate Station

6 ft. Sidewalk

0.3

NW

(2)

$280,000

 

 

Millhopper Greenway from Millhopper Road to NW 39th

Multiuse off-road facility

1.5

NW

(1), (3)

 

$1,125,000

 

CR 235A from end of existing sidewalk to NW 177th Ave

Sidewalk

0.4

NW

(2)

 

$175,000

 

SW 122nd St from Newberry Rd to SW 8th Ave

Multiuse off-road facility

1

NW

(1), (2)

 

$750,000

 

NW 39th Ave from NW 143rd St to I-75

Multiuse off-road facility

3

NW

(1), (2), (3)

 

 

$1,725,000

Total Projected Cost - NW District

 

 

 

 

$1,445,000

$2,050,000

$1,725,000

SW 24th Ave from SW 87th to SW 77th St

Multiuse off-road facility

0.5

SW

(1)

$275,000

 

 

Archer Road from SW 76th Ter to SW 45th St

Multiuse off-road facility

2.25

SW

(3)

$1,700,000

 

 

Archer Braid from Tower Road to Lake Kanapaha

Multiuse off-road facility

1

SW

(1), (2), (3)

$300,000

 

 

SW 122nd St from SW 40th Ave to SW 24th Ave

Multiuse off-road facility

2

SW

(2)

Developer funded

 

 

SW 75th St from SW 73rd Way to 6200 Block of SW Archer Road

Multiuse off-road facility

1.6

SW

(1)

 

$850,000

 

SW 20th/24th Ave from Tower Road to I-75

Multiuse off-road facility

1.5

SW

(1)

 

$180,000

 

SW 122nd St from SW 24th Ave to SW 8th Ave

Multiuse off-road facility

1

SW

(1), (2)

 

$750,000

 

SW 91st St from SW 46th Blvd to SW 8th Ave

Multiuse off-road facility

3

SW

(1)

 

 

$2,250,000

SW 136th St from W Newberry Rd to SW 6th Rd

6 ft. Sidewalk

0.5

SW

(1)

 

 

$220,000

Total Projected Cost - SW District

 

 

 

 

$2,275,000

$1,780,000

$2,470,000

SE 27th St from SE 28th Dr to SE 29th Pl

6 ft. sidewalk

1.2

E

(1)

$540,000

 

 

NE 27th Ave from SR 222 to SR 26

Multiuse off-road facility

2.7

E

(1)

 

$2,025,000

 

Kincaid Loop Connector from SE 15th to Hawthorne Road

Multiuse off-road facility

3.1

E

(1)

 

$2,325,000

 

NE 39th Ave from Airport Entrance to NE 52nd St

6ft. Sidewalk

1

E

(1), (3)

 

 

$450,000

Total Projected Cost - E District

 

 

 

 

$540,000

$4,350,000

$450,000

Dollar figures are estimates of project costs. Funding Sources (1) Local Sources (2) Developer Funded (3) Non-local Sources

Table 1c. Multi-modal Transportation Capital Improvements for Fiscal Year 2019-2020 to Fiscal Year 2039-2040  – Express Transit and Capital

Project Name-Location

Project Description

Mobility District

Funding Source

FY 2020-2024

FY 2025-2029

FY2030-2039

Jonesville Express

Express Transit Service from Jonesville to UF

 

(1), (2), (3)

$762,615

$1,271,025

$2,542,050

Jonesville Activity Center Park & Ride

Park & Ride

NW

(1), (2), (3)

$360,000

 

 

NW 122nd Park & Ride

Park & Ride

NW

(1), (2), (3)

 

$210,000

 

NW 98th Area Park & Ride

Park & Ride

NW

(1), (2), (3)

 

$210,000

 

Ft. Clarke / I-75 Park & Ride

Park & Ride

NW

(1), (2), (3)

$450,000

 

 

Spring Hills Activity Center Park & Ride

Park & Ride

NW

(2)

 

Projected Developer Constructed

 

Santa Fe Park & Ride

Park & Ride

NW

(2)

 

Projected Developer Constructed

 

Santa Fe College Park & Ride

Park & Ride

NW

(2)

 

College Funded

 

Northwest Express Transit Vehicles

Buses

NW

(1), (2), (3)

$2,700,000

$1,400,000

$1,500,000

Total Projected Cost – NW District

 

 

 

$1,572,615

$3,091,025

$2,542,050

Santa Fe / Tower Express

Express Transit Service from Springhills Activity Center to Archer / Tower Activity Center

SW

(1), (2), (3)

$381,308

$635,513

$1,271,025

Haile Plantation Express

Express Transit Service from Haile Plantation to UF

SW

(1), (2), (3)

$762,615

$1,271,025

$2,542,050

Veterans Park, Park & Ride

Park & Ride

SW

(1), (2), (3)

$180,000

 

 

Tower / Archer Activity Center Park & Ride

Park & Ride

SW

(1), (2), (3)

$360,000

 

 

I-75 Park & Ride

Park & Ride

SW

(1), (2), (3)

 

$450,000

 

SW 62nd Area Park & Ride

Park & Ride

SW

(1), (2), (3)

 

$210,000

 

SW 91st Park & Ride

Park & Ride

SW

(1), (2), (3)

 

$450,000

 

Haile Plantation Park & Ride

Park & Ride

SW

(1), (2), (3)

$180,000

 

 

Southwest Express Transit Vehicles

Buses

SW

(1), (2), (3)

$2,700,000

$1,400,000

$1,500,000

Total Projected Cost – SW District

 

 

 

$4,563,923

$4,416,538

$5,313,075

Eastside Express Service

Express Transit Service from Eastside Activity Center to UF

E

(1), (2), (3)

$488,073

$813,455

$1,626,910

Eastside Park Park & Ride

Park & Ride

E

(1), (2), (3)

 

$360,000

 

East Express Transit Vehicles

Buses

E

(1), (2), (3)

$1,200,000

$600,000

$650,000

Total Projected Cost – E District

 

 

 

$1,688,073

$1,773,455

$2,276,910

Dollar figures are estimates of project costs. Funding Sources (1) Local Sources (2) Developer Funded (3) Non-local Sources

Table 1d: Transportation FY 2020-2029 – Newberry Village

Project

FY 2020-2024

FY 2025-2030

FY 2030-2039

Funding Source

Newberry Village TOD Transit Operations*

$600,000

$1,250,000

$2,500,000

Developer/CDD

Newberry Village Dedicated Transit Lanes from NW 23rd Avenue to Newberry Road

$660,940

   

Developer/CDD

Modifications  to I-75 interchange to accommodate Transit

$300,000

   

Developer/CDD

Dollar figures are estimates of project costs.

Table 1e: Transportation FY 2020-2029 – SantaFe Village TOD

Project

FY 2020-2024

FY 2025-2029

FY2030-2039

Funding Source

SantaFe Village TOD Transit Operations

$750,000

$1,750,000

$3,500,000

Developer/CDD

SantaFe Village Transit Lanes from NW 39th Avenue to NW 23rd Avenue

$2,532,500

   

Developer/CDD

SantaFe Village Dedicated Transit Lanes north From NW 39th Avenue through to NW 91st Street

$3,426,330

$3,426,330

 

Developer/CDD

SantaFe Village Greenway to Millhopper Road

 

$1,125,000

 

Developer/CDD

SantaFe Village 83rd Street local road extension

 

$1,899,300

 

Developer/CDD

Dollar figures are estimates of project costs.

Table 1f: Transportation FY 2020-2029 – Springhills TOD

Project

FY 2020-2024

FY 2025-2029

FY2030-2039

Funding Source

Springhills TOD Transit Operations

$1,200,000

$2,250,000

$4,500,000

Developer/CDD

Springhills  Roadway, Trail, and Dedicated Transit Lanes specified in Policy 2.5.1(b)5 of the Future Land Use Element

 

$23,161,600

 

Developer/CDD

Springhills Dedicated Transit Lanes north From NW 91st Street to I-75

$3,000,000

 

 

Developer/CDD

NW 91st Street Intersection and roadway upgrade

$500,000

 

 

Developer/CDD

Dollar figures are estimates of project costs.

 

 

Table 2. Public School Facilities Schedule of Capacity Projects for Fiscal Years 2018-2019 to 2022-2023

 

Project Description

Location

 

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

Total

Funded

New Elementary A

Not specified

Planned Cost:

$0

$0

$22,500,000

$0

$0

$22,500,000

No

 

 

Student Stations:

0

0

773

0

0

773

 

 

 

Total Classrooms:

0

0

41

0

0

41

 

 

 

Gross Sq. Ft:

0

0

114,081

0

0

114,081

 

Dollar figures are estimates of project costs.

 

Source:  Alachua County Public Schools, 5-Year District Work Plan for Fiscal Years 2018-2019 to 2022- 2023, November 2018.

Note:     The new elementary school identified in Table 2 above is identified in the adopted 2018-2019 Five-Year District Work Program as an unfunded project for the 2021-2022 school year.

 

According to the Alachua County Public Schools 2019 Annual Concurrency Report (February 2019), with the passage of the County schools sales tax referendum in 2018, the funding and programming of this new elementary school will be of primary importance in the 2019-20 Five Year District Facilities Work Plan.

 

 

Table 3. Recreation Facilities Schedule of Capital Improvements, for Fiscal Years 2020 to 2024

Activity-Based Recreation

Project Name and Description

FY

19/20

FY

20/21

FY

21/22

FY

22/23

FY

23/24

Total

FY 20-24

Squirrel Ridge Park

Restroom

$194,043

(GF)

       

$194,043

Jonesville Park

Restroom

$197,646

(PIF)

       

$197,646

Veterans Park

Hockey Rink Pavillion

 

 

 

$75,000

(PIF)

$75,000

(PIF)

$150,000

Veterans Park

Splash Pad

$175,000

(PIF)

$75,000

(PIF)

$75,000

(PIF)

   

$325,000

Dollar figures are estimates of project costs.

PIF = Park Impact Fees

GF = General Fund

 

Table 3 (continued). Recreation Facilities Schedule of Capital Improvements, Fiscal Years 2019 to 2023

Resource-Based Recreation

Project Name & Description

FY

18/19

FY

19/20

FY

20/21

FY

21/22

FY

22/23

Total

FY19-23

Mill Creek Preserve

Educational signs

$3000

(GF/ACF/T)

 

 

 

 

$3000

Sweetwater Preserve

Trailhead/parking area & stormwater pond

$129,000

(ACF/GF/G)

 

 

 

 

$129,000

Barr Hammock Preserve

Trails, amenities, landing overlook, interpretive signs, boardwalk over Levy canal, Levy overlook.

 

$20,000

(ACF/GF/G)

 

$70,000 (G/ACF)

$51,000 (G/ACF)

 

 

$141,000

Lake Alto Preserve

Tree Frog Trail boardwalk

 

 

 

 

$40,000 (GF)

$40,000

Phifer Flatwoods Preserve

Turpentine Trail boardwalk, Phifer Additions trailhead

 

$40,000

 (T/G)

 

 

$5200

(T/G/GF)

$45,200

Watermelon Pond

Trail head and viewing areas

$5,000

(ACF/GF)

 

 

 

 

$5000

Turkey Creek Hammock

Develop parking area/trailhead, entrance, marsh overlook, fitness trail, Wildlife observation platform, boardwalk

$110,800  (ACF/GF/T)

$5,000 (ACF/G/T)

 

 

 

$200,000

(ACF/G/DON)

$315,800

Four Creeks

Trailhead, parking, kiosk, signage

$30,000

(WSPP)

 

 

 

 

$30,000

Buck Bay Flatwoods

(Cox & Moore Tract)

 

$13,900

 (T,GF, ACF)

 

 

 

$13,900

Dollar figures are estimates of project costs.

GF = General Fund                             ACF = Alachua County Forever                                               G = Grant          

DON = Private Donation                   WSPP = Wild Spaces Public Places Sales Tax
                                                               T = Timber Revenue

 

In addition to the planned projects listed above, additional recreation projects will be identified and funded out of the Alachua County Wild Spaces Public Places (WSPP) voter-approved sales tax revenues.





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