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Comprehensive Plan
2019-2040




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Future Land Use

GOAL

ENCOURAGE THE ORDERLY, HARMONIOUS, AND JUDICIOUS USE OF LAND, CONSISTENT WITH THE FOLLOWING GUIDING PRINCIPLES.

PRINCIPLE 1

PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE LAND DEVELOPMENT THAT PROVIDES FOR A BALANCE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY, SOCIAL EQUITY INCLUDING ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE, AND PROTECTION OF THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT.

PRINCIPLE 2

BASE NEW DEVELOPMENT UPON THE PROVISION OF NECESSARY SERVICES AND INFRASTRUCTURE. FOCUS URBAN DEVELOPMENT IN A CLEARLY DEFINED AREA AND STRENGTHEN THE SEPARATION OF RURAL AND URBAN USES.

PRINCIPLE 3

RECOGNIZE RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS AS A COLLECTIVE ASSET FOR ALL RESIDENTS OF THE COUNTY.

PRINCIPLE 4

CREATE AND PROMOTE COHESIVE COMMUNITIES THAT PROVIDE FOR A FULL RANGE AND MIX OF LAND USES.

                                                                                             

General Strategies to implement these Principles include:

GENERAL STRATEGY 1

Minimize the conversion of land from rural to urban uses by maximizing the efficient use of available urban infrastructure, while preserving environmentally sensitive areas, according to the following:

· Designate and maintain on the Future Land Use Map an urban cluster that sets a boundary for urban growth.

· Provide incentives for higher average densities for residential development and mixed uses in the urban cluster, including density bonuses and transfer of development rights.

· Provide a range of urban residential densities with the highest densities located in or near urban activity centers, and lower densities located in outlying rural areas or areas of the County which have physical limitations to development.

· Utilize mechanisms such as land acquisition, conservation easements, variable lot sizes, and conservation subdivisions.

· Preserve ecosystems of a given area and incorporate hazard-resilient land planning.

· Time development approval in conjunction with the economic and efficient provision of supporting community facilities, urban services, and infrastructure, such as streets, utilities, police and fire protection service, emergency medical service, mass transit, public schools, recreation and open space, in coordination with policies in the Capital Improvements Element.

GENERAL STRATEGY 2

Promote land development that maximizes the use of public investments in facilities and services, ensures a proper level of public services for all new development, and preserves existing amenities.  Land use decisions shall be made consistent with public facility improvements which shall be provided in accordance with the following priorities:

· in areas where the lack of public facilities threatens the health and safety of the community;

· in urban areas that are lacking adequate public facilities to meet the needs of existing development and to encourage infill development, and mixed-use  redevelopment;

· in new areas which are part of a planned expansion of public services to encourage growth; and

· to extend individual services to meet the demands created by a specific development.

 

GENERAL STRATEGY 3

Promote the spatial organization of neighborhoods, districts, and corridors through urban design codes, incorporating graphics that serve as predictable guides for community development. Implementation shall be through a combination of standard requirements and incentives, creating a planning framework that includes provisions to:

· Create neighborhoods that are compact, connected to adjacent development, have limited mixed uses at centers, and have interconnected, mixed modal streets with pedestrian, bicycle, and transit friendly areas. 

· Integrate civic, institutional, and commercial activity in neighborhoods and districts, not isolated in remote, single-use complexes.

· Avoid large areas of single-use, similar densities, and similar types of units. A diverse mix of land uses, housing types and costs and densities shall be promoted. Identify locations or districts where special or single use activities shall be allowed or restricted (e.g., large scale retail or industrial areas).

· Link corridors that are regional connectors of neighborhoods and districts, ranging from parkways and transit lines to watersheds and greenways.

· Provide for infill where appropriate. 

 

1.0 URBAN RESIDENTIAL POLICIES 

OBJECTIVE 1.1 – GENERAL

Encourage development of residential land in a manner which promotes social and economic diversity, provides for phased and orderly growth consistent with available public facilities, and provides for access to existing or planned public services such as schools, parks, and cultural facilities.

Policy 1.1.1      Adequate locations shall be available in the urban cluster for all types of housing including the placement of manufactured homes, and manufactured home parks and subdivisions.

Policy 1.1.2      Urban Residential development situated adjacent to Interstate 75 shall be adequately buffered to attenuate traffic noise.

Policy 1.1.3      Urban Residential development shall be consistent with the Conservation policies of Alachua County.

Policy 1.1.4      Higher urban densities than designated on the Future Land Use Map may be allowed for housing as established by policies in the Housing Element of the Comprehensive Plan.

Policy 1.1.5      Master planning of all contiguous land under common ownership or control is strongly encouraged.

OBJECTIVE 1.2 -             LOCATION, MIX OF USES, AND IMPLEMENTATION CONSISTENT WITH MARKET DEMAND

Provide for adequate future urban residential development that includes a full range of housing types and densities to serve different segments of the housing market, designed to be integrated and connected with surrounding neighborhoods and the community, with opportunities for recreation and other mixed uses within walking or bicycling distance.

Policy 1.2.1      Residential areas shall allow mixed uses in traditional neighborhood developments free from the influence and encroachment of incompatible land uses, such as heavy industrial, and inappropriately scaled or designed developments, such as large-scale retail. In mixed use traditional neighborhood developments, appropriately scaled and designed non-residential land uses are compatible with single family or multi-family residential development. Mixed use traditional neighborhood developments shall be allowed in residential zoning districts and through the planned development process.

Policy 1.2.1.1  Residential areas shall be designed to provide for an interconnected system of internal circulation, including the provision of streets dedicated to the public connecting the residential area to the major street system.  New development shall not preclude public access to the development.  Residential areas shall also be designed to provide for substantial interconnectivity between adjacent developments and within developments, except where such connectivity is precluded by constraints resulting from physical layout of existing development or environmental features. The land development regulations shall detail the requirements for public access and substantial interconnectivity based on standards such as a connectivity index, maximum separations between connections to adjacent developments, and rules relative to hours, operations, and public safety considerations for any restriction of access through use of gates.

Policy 1.2.1.2  Landscapes, buffers, natural areas or transitional development practices shall be utilized in site planning to lessen impacts and integrate development along the edges of different land use categories, screen undesirable views, preserve tree canopy and vegetation in accordance with the Conservation and Open Space Element, and facilitate the safe movement of traffic and pedestrians in vehicle use areas.  Such practices may take the form of any combination of the followi

       (a)         undisturbed natural areas of non-invasive trees and plants;

(b)         landscaped open spaces with canopy trees and under-story trees and plants;

(c)         physical elements that do not impede the interconnectivity of pedestrian, bicycle, and automobile facilities, such as landscaped screens, walls, or fences; or

(d)         development practices to use massing, scale of structures, design, and transitions of intensity of uses to provide for building types, building sizes, and activities that are similar to or compatible with the character of the surrounding neighborhood and community.

Policy 1.2.2      The Unified Land Development Code shall contain regulations to preclude detrimental airport noise impact on residential areas and to protect the public's investment in the Gainesville Regional Airport.  New residential development should be allowed only under certain conditions within the Noise Contour (DNL) lines as shown on the noise exposure map included in the most current Part 150 Noise Study for Gainesville Regional Airport that has been determined to be compliant by the FAA.

Policy 1.2.3      Residential care facilities shall be allowed in residential areas and shall be designed and located to maintain compatibility with the existing residential character of neighborhoods, and shall be sufficiently dispersed to afford clients the opportunity for community integration and to avoid the concentration of residential care facilities.

Policy 1.2.4      All new residential development in the urban cluster shall:

(a)         be economically and efficiently served by supporting community facilities, and services such as streets, utilities, public educational facilities, and public protection.

(b)         connect to centralized potable water supply and sanitary sewer systems in accordance with Policy 2.1.1 of the Potable Water and Sanitary Sewer Element.

OBJECTIVE 1.3 – DENSITY

Gross residential densities shall be established to serve as a guideline for evaluating development in Alachua County.

Policy 1.3.1      Gross residential densities shall be used for the following reasons:

(a)         In order to plan for public facilities and services such as schools, sewers, fire protection, parks, roads, and storm water management , the total number of persons living in an area must be known; while, the density of specific development sites is less significant.

(b)         For any given area with the same gross residential density, the total number of dwelling units ‑ which relates to population ‑ would remain the same regardless of the type of development or the distribution of land uses in that area.  Thus, gross residential density allows greater flexibility of housing types in each area.

(c)         The concept of gross density encourages developers to allocate land for public facilities, such as schools, fire stations, roads, storm water management and parks, without being penalized for reduction in total dwelling units.

(d)         Gross residential density provides the developer with incentives to reduce overall site and housing costs, as well as to provide for more innovative design than is possible under conventional (net density) development.

(e)         Gross density encourages the protection of undevelopable conservation areas through the transfer of dwelling units on the property.  However, there may be instances where the resulting net density will be inappropriate for a given site.  These proposals shall be reviewed on an individual case basis.

Policy 1.3.2      The following classification of gross residential densities shall serve as a standard for evaluating development in Alachua County, unless specific provisions are otherwise provided in the Plan (DU/Acre = Dwelling Units per Acre), such as for Transit Oriented Developments and Traditional Neighborhood Developments.

Policy 1.3.2.1  Urban Residential Densities ‑ Areas designated on the Future Land Use Map for gross residential densities of one unit per acre or greater shall be considered as urban in character.  There shall be four gross residential density ranges as follows:  

(a)         Low Density:  One to Four dwelling units per acre

(b)         Medium Density: Greater than Four to less than or equal to Eight dwelling units per acre

(c)         Medium‑High Density: Greater than Eight to less than or equal to 14 dwelling units per acre

(d)         High Density: Greater than 14 to less than or equal to 24 dwelling units per acre

 

Policy 1.3.2.2  Estate Residential - The Estate Residential designation, with a maximum density of one dwelling unit per two acres, shall only be located in the urban cluster on properties adjacent or near Preservation areas, as identified on the Future Land Use Map, as a transitional land use to higher intensity or density urban development.

Policy 1.3.3      A range in urban residential densities should be provided with the highest densities located in or near urban activity centers and transit oriented developments, and lower densities located in outlying areas or areas of the County which have physical limitations to development.    

Policy 1.3.4      The gross residential densities of new subdivisions and multi-family developments shall not be less than the urban residential density range for the assigned future land use category except where necessary to protect natural resource conservation areas as identified in Objective 3.1 of the Conservation and Open Space Element.  With regard to land designated Low Density Residential (1-4 DU/acre) on the Future Land Use Map, an exception may be made for subdivisions with gross densities of one dwelling unit per two acres with lots as small as one dwelling unit per acre, if it is determined that severe environmental site constraints, infrastructure constraints, or parcels of limited scale preclude achieving a gross density of one unit per acre.  However, nothing in this policy shall be interpreted to preclude single-family residential construction on one or two new parcels, each not exceeding 5 acres, where such parcels are divided from a parcel of record (as of October 2, 1991) when such division is not subject to subdivision regulations.

Policy 1.3.5      Within areas designated Low Density Residential (1-4 DU/acre) on the Future Land Use Map, the Agriculture zoning district may be maintained pursuant to the following requirements:

(a)         The parcel contains a minimum of 40 acres;

(b)         The property has a bonafide agricultural use which is evidenced by maintenance of an agricultural exemption for ad valorem tax purposes.

(c)         Two new parcels of 5 acres or less may be created from such Agricultural parcels. Any further division shall be subject to rezoning to an Urban Residential zoning classification, compliance with minimum density requirements, and compliance with applicable subdivision regulations.

ACCESSORY DWELLING UNITS

Policy 1.3.6      To provide for a greater range of choices of housing types in single family residential areas, affordable housing, and the promotion of infill to new and existing neighborhoods while maintaining single family character, one accessory dwelling unit shall be allowed on single family residential lots in the Estate, Low, and Medium Density residential areas without being included in gross residential density calculations. Performance criteria shall be detailed in the land development regulations and include elements such as size, site design, landscaping, access, and parking requirements.

Policy 1.3.6.1  Prior to the issuance of a building permit for the construction of an accessory dwelling unit in an existing residential area, the applicant shall provide proof of homestead exemption status establishing ownership and principal residence of the lot. Prior to the issuance of a building permit for the construction of an accessory dwelling unit(s) in a new residential development, the applicant shall provide proof of deed restrictions or covenants requiring that an accessory unit may not be inhabited unless homestead status is maintained on the lot. Permanent occupancy by the owner of either the primary or accessory dwelling unit shall be required for all accessory dwelling units.

Policy 1.3.6.2  All accessory dwelling units shall be required to connect to the municipal potable water and sewer system of the primary residence and shall not have separate services. Where central water and sewer service is not available, the accessory dwelling unit shall be required to connect to the septic system and well of the primary residence in accordance with all applicable requirements of the Florida Department of Health. The septic system shall meet the residential lot requirements for well and septic provided in the land development regulations.

URBAN RESIDENTIAL DENSITIES               

Policy 1.3.7      Low Density Residential land use category shall provide for a gross density of one to four dwelling units per acre   except as provided for in Cottage Neighborhoods, Transit Oriented Development (TOD) and Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND) meeting the requirements of this Element.

Policy 1.3.7.1  Low Density residential land use category shall provide for single residential detached and attached dwellings. In addition, traditional neighborhood developments (TND), transit oriented developments (TOD) and planned developments may include mixed housing types and mixed uses.

Policy 1.3.7.2  The Low Density residential land use category shall provide for various housing types, such as conventional site-built single family homes, accessory living units, attached structures including townhouses, multi-family developments in planned developments, dwellings with zero lot line orientation, factory-built modular units, manufactured homes, or mobile homes. 

Policy 1.3.7.3  The County’s Land Development Regulations shall allow Low or Medium density residential land use to include flexible and mixed minimum lot sizes, relying on design standards and gross density. Such provisions shall address the need for affordable housing, compatibility with transit alternatives, and open space preservation including greenway corridors.

Policy 1.3.8      Medium Density Residential land use category shall provide for a gross density of four to eight dwelling units per acre except as provided for in Cottage Neighborhoods, Transit Oriented Development (TOD) and Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND) meeting the requirements of this Element.

Policy 1.3.8.1  Medium Density residential development shall provide for small lot single family residential detached and attached dwellings, and multi-family residential dwellings. In addition, traditional neighborhood developments (TND), transit oriented developments (TOD) may include mixed housing types and mixed uses.

Policy 1.3.8.2  Multi‑family development outside a TND or TOD in the Medium Density Residential land use category shall: 

(a)         have direct access to an arterial or collector, or alternate access if the access meets the following requirements and is approved by the Board of County Commissioners:

(1)         The character of the primary access street should not be single family residential in nature and use of the street for multi-family development shall not create an adverse impact on surrounding properties. 

(2)         The access street shall generally meet the criteria for an arterial or collector street in an Urban Activity Center including the design elements found in the Alachua County Corridor Design Manual. 

(b)         provide natural and landscaped open spaces, or transitional development and design practices, to adequately integrate the development along the edges of different land use categories.

(c)         provide common open space as part of open space requirements established in the Conservation and Open Space Element.

(d)         provide adequate developed recreation at the scale of the development, according to criteria in the land development regulations.

Policy 1.3.8.3  The Medium Density residential land use category shall provide for various housing types, such as conventional, site-built single family dwellings, accessory living units, attached structures including townhouses, dwellings with zero lot line orientation, factory-built modular units, manufactured homes, mobile homes, or multi-family dwellings.

Policy 1.3.8.4  Medium density residential areas shall be located in the urban cluster.

Policy 1.3.9      Medium High Density Residential land use category shall provide for a gross density of eight to 14 dwelling units per acre, except as provided for in Transit Oriented Development (TOD) and Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND) meeting the requirements of this Element.

Policy 1.3.9.1  The Medium-High Density residential land use category shall provide for small lot single family residential detached and attached dwellings, and multiple family residential dwellings. In addition, traditional neighborhood developments (TND) and transit oriented developments (TOD) may include mixed housing types and mixed uses.

Policy 1.3.9.2  Multi-family development outside a TND or TOD in the Medium-High Density Residential, land use category shall:

(a)         Have direct access to an arterial or collector, or alternate access if the access meets the following requirements and is approved by the Board of County Commissioners:

(1)         The character of the access street should not be single family residential in nature and use of the street for multi-family development shall not create an adverse impact on surrounding properties.

(2)         The access street shall generally meet the criteria for an arterial or collector street in an Urban Activity Center including the design elements found in the Alachua County Corridor Design Manual.

(3)         The land development regulations have been updated with specific criteria to be met for approval of an alternate access road.

(b)         Provide natural and landscaped open spaces, or transitional development and design practices, to adequately integrate the development along the edges of different land use categories.

(c)         Provide common open space as part of open space requirements established in the Conservation and Open Space Element.

(d)         Provide adequate developed recreation at the scale of the development, according to criteria in the land development regulations

Policy 1.3.10    High Density Residential shall provide for a gross density of 14 to 24 dwelling units per acre.

Policy 1.3.10.1       High Density Residential development should occur within transit oriented developments in activity centers and immediately adjacent to Santa Fe Community College to reduce the length and number of automobile trips.   High density residential areas shall be located in the urban cluster.

Policy 1.3.10.2       The High Density Residential land use category shall provide for small lot single family residential detached and attached dwellings, and multiple family residential dwellings. In addition, transit oriented developments (TOD) may include mixed housing types and mixed uses.

Policy 1.3.10.3       High Density Residential outside of a TOD development shall:

(a)         Have access to an arterial or collector.

(b)         Provide natural and landscaped open spaces, or transitional development and design practices, to adequately integrate the development along the edges of different land use categories.

(c)         Provide common open space as part of open space requirements established in the Conservation and Open Space Element.

(d)         Provide adequate developed recreation at the scale of the development, according to criteria in the land development regulations.

(e)         Provide transit facilities, if warranted based on existing or planned transit service determined through consultation with the appropriate transit provider, and connect pedestrian facilities into the nearest pedestrian network and available or planned mass transit facility.

Policy 1.3.10.4       Densities higher than 24.00 DU/Acre may be considered in activity centers and within developments that meet the standards for Transit Oriented Development as provided in Objective 1.7 and subsequent policies. A comprehensive plan amendment will be required to establish additional policies to ensure compatibility with surrounding land uses and identify areas appropriate for these higher densities.

 

OBJECTIVE 1.4 – NEIGHBORHOOD DESIGN AND SITE STANDARDS

Encourage the use of innovative concepts for residential development to allow for appropriate mixes of housing types and mixed-use development within Traditional Neighborhood and Transit Oriented Development, adequately served by necessary supporting facilities, in an efficient, environmentally sensitive, and attractive manner.

Policy 1.4.1      The use of proven, innovative concepts for residential development such as TND and TOD are strongly encouraged.   

Policy 1.4.1.1  Appropriate mixes of housing types shall be allowed where such mixes may be integrated with the character of the surrounding residential area.

Policy 1.4.1.2  Existing or planned supporting facilities and utilities shall be adequate to serve proposed densities.

Policy 1.4.1.3  Planned developments, subdivisions, traditional neighborhood developments and transit oriented developments designed for phasing shall embody proper access, circulation, drainage, open space and utilities for each phase to ensure viability at all stages of development.

Policy 1.4.1.4  Urban development shall incorporate design techniques to promote integration with adjacent neighborhoods and enhance the quality of the living environment. Such design techniques shall include:

(a)         Quality design practices, transitional intensity (types of uses), stepped density, buffering, boundaries, landscaping, and natural open space.

(b)         Open space shall be designed to be accessible as required by  Conservation and Open Space Policy 5.2.3 and Stormwater Management Element Policy 5.1.11.  Open space requirements fulfilled through the use of conservation resource areas per Conservation and Open Space Element Policy 5.2.2 shall incorporate accessible open space, to the extent consistent with the character and protection of the resource.

(c)         Special attention shall be provided to the design of development and neighborhood edges, which shall be designed to be integrated into the surrounding community.

Policy 1.4.2      Residential developments of mixed housing types may be allowed through the development review process provided the development is consistent with Comprehensive Plan policies, Land Development Regulations, and provides:

(a)         A pedestrian and bicycle friendly environment that encourages walking and bicycling as a primary means of mobility within the development,

(b)         A gridded street network that allows for multiple route choices, reduces the distance between uses to encourage walking and biking, accommodates transit service and connects with adjacent developments, 

(c)         On-street parking and screening of off-street surface parking.

OBJECTIVE 1.5 – REQUIRED FACILITIES

All new residential development shall meet the requirements for adequate facilities as established or referenced in this section.

Policy 1.5.1      New residential development shall meet all of the requirements for adequate facilities based on the level of service standards adopted in this Plan for roads, potable water, sanitary sewer, solid waste, stormwater, public schools, recreation and open space facilities, and mass transit and the concurrency provisions of this Plan.    

Policy 1.5.2      In addition to the facilities for which level of service standards are adopted as part of the concurrency management system of this Plan, other facilities that should be adequate to serve new urban residential development include:

(a)         local streets;

(b)         police, fire and emergency medical service protection;

(c)         pedestrian and bicycle network; and

(d)         primary and secondary schools.

Policy 1.5.3      New residential developments shall provide for the provision of high speed internet access as specified in the land development regulations.

OBJECTIVE 1.6 – TRADITIONAL NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENTS

To provide for interconnected, mixed-use development through specific site and design standards that create pedestrian and bicycle friendly communities, reduce per capita greenhouse gas emissions and vehicular trips on external roadways and provide development patterns that are transit supportive.

Policy 1.6.1      Traditional Neighborhood Developments shall be:

(a)         Allowed in areas designated on the Future Land Use map for Urban Residential Densities (Policy 1.3.2.1) and Activity Centers within the Urban Cluster,

(b)         At least 15 acres in size,

(c)         Allowed through the development plan review process consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and Land Development Regulations.

Policy 1.6.2      Public Participation.  A public involvement process shall be used for establishing Traditional Neighborhood Developments. The process shall include a neighborhood workshop or other similar forum to inform surrounding neighborhoods of the scope, scale, and character of services and impacts from the proposed village center, and to inform the developer of neighborhood concerns. The workshop will help to identify common interests as well as concerns and differences.

Policy 1.6.3      Traditional Neighborhood Developments shall provide: 

(a)         A village center, as provided in Policy 1.6.4 and subsequent policies,

(b)         Compact, mixed-use development to allow for the internal capture of pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular trips,

(c)         A pedestrian and bicycle friendly environment that encourages walking and bicycling as a primary means of mobility within the development and between adjacent developments,

(d)         A gridded street networks that emanates from the village center that allows for multiple route choices, reduces the distance between uses to encourage walking and biking, accommodates transit and connects with adjacent developments, 

(e)         On-street parking and screening of off-street surface parking.

Policy 1.6.4      Village Centers.  Traditional Neighborhood Developments shall be required to have compact, definable mixed use, pedestrian and bicycle friendly village centers that offer multiple destinations and reasons for pedestrians and bicyclist to frequent the area.

Policy 1.6.4.1  The village center shall offer a mixture of uses and community gathering spaces to attract pedestrians and bicyclists and serve as the focal point of the development.  The highest density, intensity and mixture of uses shall be located within the village center and emanate from the village center along a gradient suitable to the site and surrounding land uses.

Policy 1.6.4.2  Plazas, squares, and open spaces that function as community gathering places shall be located within the village center and interspersed throughout the development. Plazas, squares and open space within the village center should be appropriately sized to maintain urban character, pedestrian scale, and compatibility with the typical block lengths provided in the village center.      

Policy 1.6.4.3  A central point located in a plaza, square, open space or denoted by an architecturally significant feature, shall be established as part of the development. The central point shall be the location from which policies related to the measurements of village centers and transit supportive areas are derived.

Policy 1.6.4.4  The maximum extent of the village center shall generally be a 1/8 mile radius in size utilizing a block or radial pattern, measured from the central point of the village center. The maximum extent of the transit supportive area, inclusive of the village center, shall generally be a 1/4 mile radius in size utilizing a block or radial pattern measured from the central point of the village center.  The village center and transit supportive area boundaries may be limited in size due to environmental, topographical or physical constraints and shall not extend beyond the developments property boundary. Some flexibility may be provided within the Land Development Regulations (LDRs) for the standards regulated by these designations to allow for irregular shaped parcels, environmental, topographical or physical constraints and appropriate transition zones, provided the result is consistent with the general requirement to provide a walkable and bikeable environment that supports transit. 

Policy 1.6.4.5  The primary orientation for a village center is internal to the development.  Any portion of the village center oriented to major external roadways shall provide for an enhanced pedestrian environment including additional planting area between the village center and external collector and arterial roadway, pedestrian facilities, protection from the elements for pedestrians, on-street parking and vehicular access.

Policy 1.6.4.6  Village centers shall generally be located at least ½ mile from adjacent village centers and activity centers to optimize transit station spacing and reduce the potential for strip non-residential development patterns. Exceptions shall be established in the Land Development Regulations (LDR’s) for projects that can demonstrate through site design layout and building design that spacing less than ½ mile will not result in strip development patterns. 

Policy 1.6.4.7  A transit station shall be provided within the village center for projects contiguous to a Rapid Transit or Express Transit Corridor; projects not located along a Transit Corridor shall provide right-of-way or an easement. The transit station shall be of sufficient size to accommodate the persons expected to live, work and shop within the development. Transit stations and access shall be safe, comfortable and convenient for its intended users.  The transit station shall be integrated into the village center, in close proximity retail uses. Regional Transit System (RTS) shall be a reviewing entity along with the County and FDOT along State Roadways.

Policy 1.6.5      Density & Mixed Uses:  A balanced mixture of uses shall be provided to create vibrant activity throughout the day and allow individuals to live, work and play in the same community without having to rely solely on a motor vehicle for mobility, thereby reducing per capita greenhouse gas emissions.

Policy 1.6.5.1  The density for Traditional Neighborhood Developments shall be as follows:

(a)         Within the transit supportive area, a minimum of four (4) units per acre, or the minimum density of the underlying land use category, whichever is greater,

(b)         The density for areas outside the transit supportive area shall be consistent with the underlying land use category,

(c)         For TNDs that are not contiguous with a planned Rapid Transit or Express Transit Corridor, an additional four (4) units per acre within the transit supportive area are allowed, 

(d)         For TNDs contiguous with a Rapid Transit or Express Transit Corridor, an additional eight (8) units per acre within the village center and six (6) units per acre within the transit supportive area outside of the Village Center are allowed.

Policy 1.6.5.2  To ensure a mixture of uses, the following non-residential (heated and cooled) square footage is required:

(a)         Provide at least 10,000 square feet of non-residential uses, plus

(b)         A minimum of 50 square feet of non-residential uses for every 1 residential unit.

(c)         A maximum of 250 square feet of non-residential uses for every 1 residential unit is allowed.

(d)         For projects that provide 100% of the allowable underlying land use density, an additional 10,000 square feet square feet of non-residential development is allowed with an additional 10,000 square feet of non-residential development  allowed for each one (1) unit per acre above 100% of the underlying land use.

(e)         For projects contiguous with a Rapid Transit or Express Transit Corridor an additional 25,000 square feet of non-residential development is allowed.

(f)          To encourage infill and redevelopment, the square footage of existing non-residential uses may either be utilized to meet the requirements above or be in addition to the above requirements.

Policy 1.6.5.3  To ensure goods and services are provided in a compact area that encourages pedestrian and bicycle mobility, a minimum of fifty (50) percent of non-residential square footage shall be located in the village center. Maximum percentages shall be established in the Land Development Regulations (LDR’s) for the amount of allowable non-residential square footage outside the transit supportive area.

Policy 1.6.5.4  A mixture of residential, commercial, office, financial, institutional, lodging, medical, research and development, clean / green technology, religious and civic uses are allowed throughout the development.

Policy 1.6.5.5  A range of housing options provides opportunities for a variety of residents of various ages and income levels to reside within the same community. Single-family detached, single-family attached, multi-family, assisted and independent living facilities are all allowable residential uses. The number of rooms for student oriented housing and lodging uses may be counted as residential units for the purposes of calculating non-residential square footage allowances.  

Policy 1.6.5.6  Mixed uses, both horizontal and vertical, shall be allowed and are encouraged within all buildings.

Policy 1.6.5.7  The square footage of civic uses such as places of worship, libraries, schools and live-work studios may be excluded from the calculation of the maximum non-residential requirement provided that these uses are functionally integrated into the development, are located within the transit supportive area, and allow for shared parking during hours of non use.   

Policy 1.6.5.8  To provide for the internal capture of trips and a mixture of non-residential uses, thresholds shall be established in the Land Development Regulations (LDR’s) to ensure that a minimum percentage of non-residential uses are required to be commercial and that a minimum percentage of non-residential uses are required to be uses other than commercial. 

Policy 1.6.5.9  Minimum thresholds shall be established in the Land Development Regulations (LDRs) for the percentage of non-residential square footage required to provide a vertical mixture of uses.

Policy 1.6.5.10       To provide for a mixture of non-residential uses at a pedestrian friendly scale, maximum thresholds percentages shall be established in the Land Development Regulations (LDRs) for the square footage of a single non-residential uses in relation to the overall allowable non-residential square footage. 

Policy 1.6.5.11       Single occupant retail uses 50,000 square feet or greater in addition to all policies contained in this Element shall provide:

(a)         Separate liner buildings oriented towards a street on at least three (3) sides of the use with the rear of the building either fronting parking or lined by buildings, or

(b)         Contain a vertical mixture of uses with at least one (1) story above the ground floor, or

(c)         Multiple floors with a maximum of 50,000 square feet per floor, or

(d)         Provide parking on top of the building, or

(e)         Policy 1.6.8(h)  

Policy 1.6.5.12  Non-residential uses shall be phased with the residential component of the development. Thresholds shall be established in the Land Development Regulations (LDRs) to ensure that the difference between non-residential square footage and residential units does not exceed a minimum percentage of the total allowable for each.

Policy 1.6.5.13        A restaurant or dry cleaner with drive-thru lanes shall only be allowed as part of a multi-tenant building. A bank or pharmacy shall be allowed to have drive-thru lanes. Drive-thru lanes and drive aisles shall be located at the rear of buildings and either architecturally integrated with the building or screened from the street. Green building standards to help off-set greenhouse gas emissions shall be established in the Land Development Regulations (LDRs) for uses with drive-thru lanes.

Policy 1.6.5.14         Uses for fueling, quick service or cleaning of motor vehicles that are located within a block fronting an arterial or collector street shall locate stalls, pumps, cleaning and servicing facilities to the rear or side of the building and these shall be architecturally integrated with the building and screened from the street.  Uses for fueling shall be designed to allow for the addition of electric charging station and alternative fuels. Uses for fueling, cleaning and servicing vehicles shall be located within a block with multiple tenants and buildings and located in close proximity to a park and ride facility, if provided within the development. Green building standards to help offset greenhouse gas emissions shall be established in the Land Development Regulations (LDRs) for uses with fueling, quick service or cleaning of motor vehicles.

Policy 1.6.6      Site and Building Design: Site and building design and scale shall be oriented towards creating a pedestrian, bicycle and transit friendly environment. Architectural and site design techniques shall be used to promote walkable and bikeable communities. 

Policy 1.6.6.1  The site layout and orientation of buildings shall create a development that is designed around the pedestrian and bicyclist and creates an environment that promotes walking and bicycling as a primary means of mobility. The following are the primary components of creating a pedestrian and bicycle friendly environment:

(a)         An interconnected network of pedestrian and bicycle facilities,

(b)         Shade and protection from the elements,

(c)         Limited distances between attractors and generators,

(d)         Mixture of uses, and

(e)         Visual interest through site and building design and orientation. 

Policy 1.6.6.2  Building design and placement shall be at a pedestrian scale with primary entrances located at the front of the building oriented towards a public space such as a street, park, plaza or square. Shade shall be provided for pedestrians through means such as covered walkways, terraces, balconies, awnings and street trees. Limited exceptions may be allowed for residential and lodging uses that have a portion of units fronting a parking area located interior to a block.

Policy 1.6.6.3 To enhance the pedestrian environment, buildings shall be oriented to visually define the street edge.  Landscaping and street trees shall be utilized to define the street edge along open spaces.

Policy 1.6.6.4  Non-residential uses shall have minimal setbacks from a street right-of-way, so long as adequate space is provided for pedestrian facilities, amenities and street trees. Setbacks may be wider if a courtyard, plaza, public space or seating is provided between the building and the sidewalk. Outdoor seating is encouraged and allowed for non-residential uses. Setbacks and build-to lines shall be established for residential uses. 

Policy 1.6.6.5  All single-family attached, multi-family and non-residential uses shall require architectural design review established in the Land Development Regulations (LDR’s) including:

(a)         Flexibility in design shall allow for choice and variety in architectural style. Building facades shall provide variation in materials, roof lines, window patterns and reliefs. Objective, measurable criteria including size, scale, proportion, and materials shall be established.

(b)         Large expanses of solid wall fronting a street are prohibited. Minimum percentages of transparent glass on the façade of buildings shall be established.  All buildings shall articulate the line between the ground floor and upper levels.

Policy 1.6.6.6  Stormwater facilities shall be master planned. The location of surface stormwater facilities within the village center is discouraged. Surface stormwater facilities located in the village center should be designed in a park like manner serving as an amenity to the development.  The use of Low Impact Design (LID) techniques is required in the Sensitive Karst Areas and encouraged Countywide.

Policy 1.6.6.7  Open Space provisions shall comply with all applicable Comprehensive Plan policies and land development regulations.

Policy 1.6.6.8  The preferred location of above ground utilities, except for life safety, is to the rear and side of buildings. Above ground utility access, transfer and conveyance points such as panels, boxes, meters, and valves shall be screened from the street and sidewalks through architectural features and/or landscaping. Underground utilities are encouraged to be compressed to minimize ROW width, allow adequate space for street trees and provide for the visual definition of the street.

Policy 1.6.6.9  All recycling and trash collection for non-residential, multi-family and single family attached uses shall be located to the rear of buildings or within parking facilities. Recycling and trash collection facilities shall be screened. 

Policy 1.6.7      Transportation Network: The transportation network shall be designed as a continuous interconnected network of narrow streets, including a pedestrian and bicycle circulation system, designed to calm traffic speeds and encourage walking and bicycling throughout the development, provide connectivity, and functionally and physically integrate the various uses within and beyond the neighborhood to reduce the distances of travel between uses and promote the internal capture of trips, reduce impact on external roadways, and promote transit use.

Policy 1.6.7.1  The interconnected street network design shall be organic, block or radial.

Policy 1.6.7.2  The street network shall be designed to utilize smaller block lengths:

(a)         Perimeter block lengths shall not exceed 1,300 linear feet within the village center, 1,600 linear feet within the transit supportive area outside of the village center, and 2,000 linear feet outside the transit supportive area. 

(b)         Perimeter blocks lengths with parking provided in the interior of the block shall not exceed 2,000 linear feet in the village center, 2,300 linear feet within the transit supportive area outside of the village center, and 2,700 linear feet outside the transit supportive area.

(c)         Perimeter block lengths may be extended an additional 700 linear feet so long as parking is provided interior to the block, and a safe, convenient, landscaped pedestrian and bicycle path consistent with block lengths in (b) above is provided.

(d)         In limited instances, for projects greater than 100 acres, perimeter block lengths may be extended up to 3,000 linear feet where a multi-level parking structure or single occupant retail use greater than 25,000 square feet are located, so long as parking is provided interior to the block, and a safe, convenient, landscaped pedestrian and bicycle path consistent with block lengths in (b) above is provided.

(e)         The length of environmental, physical, topographic and property boundary constraints are allowed to be used to meet perimeter block length requirements.   

Policy 1.6.7.3  Interconnectivity for vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists shall be provided between uses. Access may be limited for independent / assisted living facilities in order to provide for the safety and security of residents.  

Policy 1.6.7.4  Street design standards shall address narrow pavement and right-of-way widths, turning radii, on-street parking, and other design criteria for roads, alleys and lanes. Standards shall promote walking and biking, ensure pedestrian and bicyclists safety, and allow for emergency and transit access. Urban green streets and Low Impact Development (LID) techniques are allowed and encouraged. 

Policy 1.6.7.5  Cross-access for vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists shall be provided to adjacent developed and undeveloped land. Exceptions may be made for environmental, topographical, or physical constraints.

Policy 1.6.7.6  The street network shall include a pedestrian and bicycle circulation system that interconnects all uses, including parks, plaza, squares and open spaces.

Policy 1.6.7.7  The streetscape within village centers shall require street furniture, planters, location maps, signage, trash receptacles and lighting along streets. The streetscape shall be compatible with regards to sidewalk materials, streetlights, cross-walks, signage, benches, and pedestrian amenities.

Policy 1.6.7.8  Pedestrian facilities shall be provided on both sides of all streets within the right-of-way. The width of pedestrian facilities shall increase as densities and intensities increase. The widest pedestrian facilities shall be provided adjacent to non-residential and mixed-use buildings. Streets providing access to single-family detached units shall have the option of providing a multi-use path parallel to the streets in-lieu of sidewalks consistent with provisions in the Transportation Mobility Element.  

Policy 1.6.7.9  One-way streets are allowed throughout the development as a means to reduce crossing distances and conflicts, impervious surfaces, and right-of way widths, thus allowing for further definition of the street edge and a sense of enclosure for pedestrians. 

Policy 1.6.7.10       Street trees with adequate planting areas shall be provided along all streets.

Policy 1.6.7.11       For projects contiguous with a Rapid Transit Corridor, dedicated transit lane(s) for use by transit vehicles or fixed guide-way rail lines for streetcars or light rail shall be provided within or adjacent to the development consistent with the Rapid Transit Corridor Map. Multi-lane roadways in-lieu of dedicated lanes may be provided within the transit supportive area for developments that can demonstrate future transit headways of 10 minutes can be maintained and feature either block lengths that average 300 feet or less or include fixed guide-way rail lines. Regional Transit System (RTS) shall be a reviewing entity along with the County and FDOT along State roadways.

Policy 1.6.7.12       Projects contiguous with the portion of the Express Transit Corridor along Tower Road shall provide either site related turn out facilities (bus bays) or dedicated lane(s). Regional Transit System (RTS) shall be a reviewing entity along with the County and FDOT along State Roadways.

Policy 1.6.7.13       For projects contiguous with a Rapid Transit Corridor, a park and ride facility shall be provided within or adjacent to the development in close proximity to the transit station consistent with the Rapid Transit Corridor Map. Park and ride facilities shall be designed for shared evening and weekend use by the development. Park and rides shall be designed in accordance with block, street tree and pedestrian facility requirements of this Element and are encouraged to be screened by liner buildings. Regional Transit System (RTS) shall be a reviewing entity along with the County and FDOT along State roadways.

Policy 1.6.8      Parking:  To promote a walkable, urban scale environment, off-street parking shall be significantly limited and designed in such a manner as to minimize visibility from the street. Parking areas shall be designed to minimize intrusiveness through the following techniques:

(a)         Innovative solutions to reduce parking requirements, decoupling parking from residential uses, provision of shared parking to serve multiple uses and alternative paving materials are allowed.  Parking maximums and innovative solutions to address parking shall be established in the Land Development Regulations.  Reduced landscaped requirements may be allowed for off-street parking provided interior to blocks.

(b)         On-street parking is allowed throughout the development. On-street parking is required on the majority of streets within the transit supportive area. Angled on-street parking shall be accessed via a drive aisle separated from through traffic by a landscaped median on roadways with a projected AADT greater than 5,000 trips.   

(c)         Off-street parking, except for ingress and egress, shall be located to the rear of buildings and shall be screened from streets and sidewalks, via liner buildings. Densely landscaped, pedestrian friendly squares and plazas may be allowed between liner buildings. A dense landscaped buffer with a multi-use pedestrian and bicycle facility may be utilized along one side of the off-street parking. Off-street parking adjacent to open space or an environmental, topographical, physical or property boundary constraint may be lined by either buildings or a dense landscaped buffer with a multi-use pedestrian and bicycle facility. 

(d)         Off-street parking shall clearly delineate routes for pedestrians and bicycles through parking areas to accommodate safe and convenient pedestrian and bicycle circulation between uses and create a park-once environment.

(e)         Vehicular use areas, other than off-street parking, shall be located along the side and rear of a building. Limited exceptions may be allowed for loading areas within drive aisles provided as part of on-street parking separated from through traffic by a median.  

(f)          Single-family garages shall be located at the rear or side of the building. Exceptions shall be allowed to address environmental, topographical, physical or property boundary constraints. 

(g)         A single transitionary off-street parking area may be allowed. The perimeter block length shall not exceed the perimeter block length requirements in Policy 1.6.7.2. Sidewalks and street trees shall be provided along the entire perimeter block length. Plans shall be submitted demonstrating the liner buildings to be provided at a future date along with justification why the additional parking is needed and why it cannot be provided elsewhere.

(h)         Single occupant retail uses greater than 25,000 square feet per floor may have parking in front of buildings so long as all surface parking and the side and rear of the building are screened from adjacent streets by liner buildings.  The rear of the building for single occupant retail uses between 25,000 and 50,000 square feet per floor may front a street so long as a functional entrance is provided and the architecture of the building provides a pedestrian friendly environment and complies with all design requirements for buildings fronting a street. 

OBJECTIVE 1.7  - TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT

To provide for compact, mixed-use, pedestrian and bicycle friendly communities designed with the densities and intensities needed to support transit service, reduced per capita greenhouse gas emissions

and enable an individual to live, work, play and shop in a community without the need to rely on a motor vehicle for mobility.

Policy 1.7.1      Transit Oriented Developments shall be:

(a)         Allowed in areas designated on the Future Land Use map for Urban Residential Densities (Policy 1.3.2.1) and Activity Centers within the Urban Cluster,

(b)         At least 15 acres in size,

(c)         Served by Express Transit Service and be contiguous to a Rapid Transit or Express Transit Corridor consistent with the Transportation Mobility Element.

(d)         Allowed through Development plan approval consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and Land Development Regulations.

Policy 1.7.2      Public Participation. Public Participation shall be consistent with standards in Policy 1.6.2 .

Policy 1.7.3      Transit Oriented Developments shall provide: 

(a)         A village center with a transit station contiguous with a Rapid Transit or Express Transit corridor,

(b)         The necessary densities to support transit service,

(c)         Compact, mixed-use development to allow for the internal capture of pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular trips,

(d)         A pedestrian and bicycle friendly environment that encourages walking and bicycling as a primary means of mobility within the development,

(e)         A gridded street network that emanates from the village center that allows for multiple route choices, reduces the distance between uses to encourage walking and biking, and connects with adjacent developments, 

(f)          Funding for express transit service consistent with the frequency and span of service specified within the Transportation Mobility Element,  

(g)         On-street parking and screening of off-street surface parking.

Policy 1.7.4      Village Center:  Transit Oriented Developments shall be required to have a compact, definable mixed use, pedestrian and bicycle friendly village center that is served by transit and offers multiple destinations and reasons for pedestrians and bicyclist to frequent the area. The Village Center shall be consistent with the Policies 1.6.4.1 through1.6.4.7 of this element.

Policy 1.7.5      Density & Mixed Uses:  A balanced mixture of uses shall be provided to create activity throughout the day and allow individuals to live, work and play in the same community without having to rely solely on a motor vehicle for mobility, thereby allowing a reduction in per capita greenhouse gas emissions.

Policy 1.7.5.1  To ensure the density needed to support transit service is provided within a walkable distance from transit, the following minimum residential densities shall be provided:

(a)         Ten (10) units per acre within the village center

(b)         Seven (7) units per acre within the transit supportive area outside of the village center

(c)         Three (3) units per acre outside the transit supportive area

(d)         Development less than 20 acres shall provide a minimum of at least 200 units

Policy 1.7.5.2  The maximum allowable density within the transit supportive area is twenty-four (24) units per acre, except as provided for in Policy 1.3.10.4 of this element. The maximum allowable density within the Village Center is forty-eight (48) units per acre. The maximum allowable density outside the transit supportive area is the maximum allowable under the underlying land use.

Policy 1.7.5.3  To ensure a mixture of uses, the following non-residential square footage (heated and cooled) his required:

(a)         Provide at least 10,000 square feet of non-residential uses, plus

(b)         A minimum of 100 square feet of non-residential uses for every 1 residential unit.

(c)         A maximum of 500 square feet of non-residential uses for every 1 residential unit shall be allowed.

(d)         To encourage infill and redevelopment, the square footage of existing non-residential may either be utilized to meet the requirements above or be in addition to the above requirements.

Policy 1.7.5.4  For developments that are at least 100 acres in size, mini storage facilities principally designed to serve the project is allowed so long as specific design criteria are established to mask the facility, integrate the use with the surrounding development and comply with all required Transit Oriented Design criteria. The facility is not allowed within the village center and the square footage of the facility shall be excluded from the non-residential square footage in policy 1.7.5.3.  

Policy 1.7.5.5  Allowable uses, mixed use provisions and percentages and phasing shall be consistent with policies 1.6.5.3 through 1.6.5.14 of this element.

Policy 1.7.6      Site and Building Design: Site and building design and scale shall be oriented towards creating a pedestrian, bicycle and transit friendly environment. Architectural and site design techniques shall be used to promote walkable, vibrant communities. Site and building design shall be consistent with policies 1.6.6 through 1.6.6.9 of this element.

Policy 1.7.7      Transportation Network: The transportation network shall be designed as a continuous interconnected network of narrow streets, including a pedestrian and bicycle circulation system, designed to calm traffic speeds and encourage walking and bicycling throughout the development, provide connectivity, and functionally and physically integrate the various uses within and beyond the neighborhood to reduce the distances of travel between uses and promote the internal capture of trips, reduce impact on external roadways, and promote transit use. Transportation network design shall be consistent with policies 1.6.7 through 1.6.7.13 of this element.

Policy 1.7.8      Parking:  To promote a walkable urban scale environment, off-street parking shall be significantly limited and designed in such a manner as to minimize visibility from the street. Parking design shall be consistent with Policy 1.6.8 of this element and the following:

Policy 1.7.8.1  For projects with more than 2,000 cumulative peak hour trips, 50% of all required parking shall be provided via parking structures and on-street parking.

Policy 1.7.8.2  Non-residential uses shall be provided on the exterior of the 1st floor of any parking structure fronting a street, except for parking structures surrounded by liner buildings. Criteria shall be established for the exterior portions of parking structures not surrounded by liner buildings.

Policy 1.7.9      Express Transit Service shall be provided from the development to the University of Florida consistent with Express Transit Corridors Map. The frequency and span of service required shall be consistent with the requirements of the Transportation Mobility Element. The Express Transit Service shall be funded for a fifteen (15) year period. Standards shall be established in the Land Development Regulations (LDRs) to ensure the level of funding is provided on a proportional basis. The employees, employers and residents of the development that contribute towards the Express Transit Service shall be provided with a mechanism that ensures they ride fare free so long as the development funds transit. The funding mechanism, details, and cost to provide Express Transit Service shall be memorialized in an enforceable developer agreement between the developer and the County in consultation with the Regional Transit System. Annexation into a municipality shall not absolve the developments requirement to fund express transit service.

Policy 1.7.10   Dedicated transit lane(s), transit turnouts (bus bays) and park and ride facilities shall be provided consistent with policies 1.6.7.11 through 1.6.7.13 of this element.

OBJECTIVE 1.8 COTTAGE NEIGHBORHOODS

Cottage Neighborhoods offer opportunities for creative, diverse and high quality infill development within the Urban Cluster and promote a variety of housing types and sizes available within the community to meet the needs of a population diverse in age, income, and household composition. These neighborhoods provide for more efficient use of land through density bonuses consistent with Housing Element Policy 1.2.2, which provides incentives for development of affordable housing. Cottage Neighborhoods encourage the creation of more usable open space for residents of the development and maximize resident and pedestrian oriented outdoor spaces while minimizing the impact of automobile traffic and parking.

Policy 1.8.1      Cottage Neighborhoods are groups of smaller homes built around a common green space.

Policy 1.8.2      Design criteria for Cottage Neighborhoods shall be established in the Unified Land Development Code and shall include, but not be limited to, provisions for clustering, and maximum neighborhood size.

Policy 1.8.3      Cottage Neighborhoods meeting the design requirements for such neighborhoods in the Unified Land Development Code shall be allowed to develop at two times the maximum units per acre of the zoning district designation.

 

OBJECTIVE 1.9 CELEBRATION POINTE TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT

To provide for a compact, mixed-use, interconnected development that creates a pedestrian, bicycle and transit friendly environment through site and building design with the densities and intensities of land uses needed to enable a person to live, work, play and shop within a development that provides mobility and accessibility options and that preserves natural areas adjacent to environmentally sensitive lands.

Policy 1.9.1      The northwest quadrant of 1-75 and Archer Road designated as Mixed-use on the Future Land Use Map shall be known as the Celebration Pointe Transit Oriented Development and shall be developed as Transit Oriented Development consistent with policies under Future Land Use Element Objective 1.7 except as otherwise provided herein under Objective 1.9. Celebration Pointe TOD shall be:

(a)         Allowed 750 square feet of non-residential land uses for every dwelling unit.

(b)         Allowed to incorporate existing non-residential buildings and dwelling units into the development. Existing buildings, dwelling units and parking areas are not required to meet design elements of Objective 1.9 until they are redeveloped or enlarged.

(c)         Allowed to repurpose surface and structured parking areas throughout the development for infill and expansion of existing buildings up to the approved development entitlements.

(d)         Allowed to propose alternative design concepts where the applicant can demonstrate that deviation is necessary and will result in a better development outcome while maintaining consistency with the intent provided in the Comprehensive Plan and subject to ULDC regulations for alternative compliance in TNDs and TODs.

(e)         Allowed to amend the existing approved Preliminary Development Plan to be consistent with Objective 1.9 and be permitted, if desired by the Developer and approved by the County, to establish specific conditions, criteria and standards on a Preliminary Development Plan that are consistent with Objective 1.9.

(f)          Consistent with Unified Land Development Code (ULDC) policies for Transit Oriented Development, expect as otherwise provided for under Objective 1. 9 of the Future Land Use Element or through conditions, criteria and standards on an approved Preliminary Development Plan that are consistent with Objective 1.9.

Policy 1.9.2      Celebration Pointe TOD shall provide:

(a)         A compact and centrally located village center (VC) oriented and designed around a main street and / or pedestrian promenade.

(b)         A transit supportive area (TSA) outside the village center.  The extents of the VC, TSA and areas outside the TSA shall be shown on the Preliminary and Final Development Plan.

(c)         The highest concentration of residential dwelling units (DU) shall be within the VC and TSA. The following are the minimum and maximum DU required and allowed within the VC, TSA and outside the TSA:

(1)         A minimum of 500 DU and a maximum of 1,000 DU in the VC.

(2)         A minimum of 300 DU and a maximum of 600 DU in the TSA.

(3)         A minimum of 200 DU and a maximum of 400 DU outside the TSA.

(d)         The highest concentration of non-residential land uses shall be within the VC. The following are the minimum and maximum percentages of non-residential square footage (NRSF) required and allowed with the VC, TSA and outside the TSA:

(1)         A minimum of 50% NRSF and a maximum of 90% NRSF in the VC.

(2)         A minimum of 10% NRSF and a maximum of 50% NRSF in the TSA.

(3)         A minimum of 0% NRSF and a maximum of 10% NRS outside the TSA.

(e)         A vertical orientation and mixture of uses by requiring that a minimum of 25% of the allowed non-residential square footage shall be within multistory buildings.

(f)          Densities of residential uses and intensity of non-residential uses that encourages walking, bicycling, low speed electric transport such as bikes, vehicles, golf-carts, Segways, trolleys, autonomous transit and short vehicular trips.

(g)         A network of streets that provides interconnectivity, mobility and accessibility achieved through establishment of the following maximum perimeter block lengths:

(1)         A maximum of 2,000 linear feet in the VC.

(2)         A maximum of 2,300 linear feet in the TSA.

(3)         A maximum of 2,700 linear feet outside the TSA.

(4)         The maximum perimeter block length maybe extended an additional 700 linear feet where a multiuse path forms an internal block length consistent with the perimeter block lengths in Policy 1.9.2 (g) 1. 2. 3.

(5)         A maximum of 3,000 linear feet for blocks with a parking garage or single-use retail building 25,000 square feet of greater in size.

(h)         A centrally located multimodal center that allows for bike and car share programs, a park and ride, drop-off and loading areas for ride share programs, transit and autonomous transit, charging stations for electric vehicles, bikes and personal e-transport, and structured parking to promote a park-once environment.

(i)          For the continued maintenance, per the Conservation Management Area Management Plan, of 88.23 acres of environmentally sensitive land protected through a conservation easement approved on May 27th, 2014 and recorded on June 16th, 2014.

Policy 1.9.3      Site, Building, Parking, and Street Design

Site, building, parking and street design shall be oriented towards creating a multimodal supportive development that encourages walking, biking, transit, shared mobility and a park once environment.

(a)         The site, building, parking and street design shall create an environment that promotes walking and bicycling as a primary means of mobility. There shall be limited distances between attractors and generators and a mixture of land uses. Visual interest shall be provided through site and building design and orientation.

(b)         Building design and placement shall be at a pedestrian scale with primary entrances located at the front of the building oriented towards a public space such as a street, park, plaza, woonerf, open space or square. Outdoor seating is encouraged and allowed for all land uses. Shade shall be provided for pedestrians through means such as terraces, balconies, awnings, architectural features, buildings and trees.

(c)         Buffers within the development and along external boundaries are only required when adjacent to external single family detached dwellings on individual lots, or as required for outdoor storage.

(d)         To the extent feasible, utilities, except for life safety, shall be located to the rear and side of buildings. Underground utilities are encouraged.  Above ground utility access, transfer and conveyance points such as panels, boxes, meters, and valves shall be screened from the street and sidewalks through architectural features and/or landscaping.

(e)         Innovative solutions to reduce parking requirements, decoupling parking from residential uses, provision of shared parking to serve multiple uses and alternative paving materials are allowed. No off-street surface parking is required for any use. Off-street parking may be shared and pooled between uses throughout the development.

(f)          Parking structures may be located throughout the development, except immediately adjacent to conservation areas and the village center main street/pedestrian promenade.  Parking structures shall make provisions for liner buildings, bottom floor uses or landscaping when fronting a street.

(g)         Off-street surface parking areas shall be located to the rear of buildings in the VC and TSA. Parking areas along the external property boundaries of the Celebration Pointe TOD are not required to be screened by buildings at the property boundary. Outside the TSA, off-street surface parking areas are permitted around all sides of buildings and are not required to be screened by liner buildings or pocket parks.

(h)         Liner buildings are encouraged but are not required for off-street parking. If liner buildings are not proposed, landscaping shall be provided to screen the parking consistent with ULDC requirements for landscaping off-street parking in TODs.

(i)          Temporary off-street surface parking areas may be permitted throughout the development to allow for construction of parking structures. The time frame for temporary parking areas shall be included on a Preliminary Development Plan.

(j)          Travel lanes may be ten feet in width on public roads within the development that also include on-street bike lanes. Travel lanes on private roads may be as narrow as nine feet in width or fourteen feet in total width for living streets and alleys. Traffic calming, raised intersections, curb extensions, along with other appropriate techniques are permitted along private roads within the development.

(k)         In order to promote walkability and safe multiple modes of travel, speed limits may be posted as low as permissible under state statute, for public roads, or as low as can be demonstrated safe for private roads.

(l)          The use of golf carts and low-speed electric vehicles are permitted on all designated streets within the development. The use of golf carts and low-speed electric vehicles on Celebration Pointe Avenue over Interstate 75 and on SW 45th Street, south of the entrance to the Reserve at Kanapaha shall only be allowed if permitted by the County Engineer. The use of golf carts and low-speed electric vehicles on designated off-street facilities may be allowed subject to approval by the County Engineer.

(m)        A circulator system that provides access to the transit transfer station east of Interstate 75 shall be permitted on all roads within the development and may address the development’s requirements to provide transit service, if included in a developer agreement approved by Alachua County. The circulator may utilize dedicated transit lanes if approved by the County Engineer.

(n)         To provide the highest level of pedestrian and bicycle accommodation, land uses with drive-thru facilities are prohibited in the VC. In recognition of greater levels of vehicular traffic on SW 45th Street and Celebration Pointe Avenue, land uses with drive-thru facilities in the TSA are allowed so long as the drive-thru facilities are located to the rear of the building and screened from adjacent streets. In recognition of existing commercial and tourist entertainment land uses oriented to serve demand from Interstate 75 and Archer Road, drive-thru facilities outside the TSA are permitted and shall be developed consistent with the general standards of the land development regulations applicable to all districts where said use is permitted. Where drive-thru facilities cross a pedestrian facility, appropriate marking and /or materials shall be provided to provide for safe pedestrian crossing.

(o)         To provide the highest level of pedestrian and bicycle accommodation, land uses for the dispensing of fuel, cleaning or servicing of vehicles are prohibited in the VC and TSA. In recognition of existing commercial and tourist entertainment land uses oriented to serve demand from Interstate 75 and Archer Road, land uses for the dispensing of fuel, cleaning or servicing of vehicles are allowed outside the TSA are permitted and shall be developed consistent with the general standards of the land use development regulations applicable to all districts where said use is permitted. 

(p)         Mini-storage land uses are prohibited within the VC. Mini-storage uses are permitted within the TSA and outside the TSA so long as they are located along the periphery.

(q)         Outdoor storage of boats, recreational vehicles, golf carts, jet skis, trailers and all-terrain vehicles may be provided for residents of the development for non-commercial purposes along the periphery of the TSA and outside the TSA. Outdoor storage shall be enclosed by a 10’ tall masonry wall and a medium density landscape buffer.

Policy 1.9.4      Landscaping

A tree mitigation phasing shall be provided, subject to County approval, to phase the planting of trees within blocks and stormwater management areas concurrent with development of adjacent buildings. Trees required for public roads shall be planted prior to acceptance of the roads by the County and warrantied per the same requirements as established for the roads.

 

2.0 URBAN ACTIVITY CENTER POLICIES

OBJECTIVE 2.1 – GENERAL

Promote efficient use of land through designation of Activity Centers within the Urban Cluster which provide for nodes of higher density and intensity mixed uses that are interconnected with other commercial, employment, light industrial, and institutional centers within Alachua County through a system of multimodal corridors and a public transit system.  Urban design standards for Activity Centers will provide for compact, mixed use, and pedestrian-friendly development, which is functionally integrated with surrounding land uses.

Policy 2.1.1      Activity Centers are identified and designated on the Future Land Use Map.

Policy 2.1.2      Activity Centers shall be designated based on two classifications depending on the size, location and function of the Activity Center:

(a)         High intensity activity centers are intended for commercial, employment, institutional, light industrial, and visitor-related uses of a scale and type that typically serve a regional or larger market.  High activity centers shall also contain higher density residential uses which are phased and interconnected with the non-residential uses in the Activity Center.  High intensity activity centers attract commercial customers or employees from within Alachua County and

surrounding cities or counties; are generally greater than 200 total acres in area; are located proximate to major interstate transportation corridors; have access to at least two arterial roadways; and are near existing or planned rapid transit corridors.

(b)         Low intensity activity centers are intended for commercial, employment, institutional, and light industrial uses of a scale and type that typically serve a community or group of neighborhoods.  Low activity centers shall also contain residential uses which are phased and interconnected with the non-residential uses in the Activity Center.  Low intensity activity centers attract commercial customers or employees primarily from within Alachua County; are generally less than 200 total acres in area; have access to at least one arterial and one collector roadway, and are near existing or planned bus, express transit, or rapid transit routes.

(c)         Detailed standards shall be included in the Land Development Code which distinguish between Low intensity and High intensity activity centers in terms of the type and scale of allowable land uses, requirements for mixed uses, and development design requirements.

Policy 2.1.3      New development and redevelopment within Activity Centers shall be consistent with the design standards of Policies 2.1.4 through 2.1.12.

Policy 2.1.4      A  mixture of residential and non-residential land uses shall be provided in Activity Centers to reduce travel distances between different types of land uses and support pedestrian, bicycle and transit opportunities.

(a)         Mixed use development plans, including vertical and horizontal mixed uses, shall be allowable in all areas within Activity Centers.

(b)         In order to increase the variety of housing opportunities within walking distance of existing or future commercial and employment areas, residential uses shall be allowable as part of mixed use development in non-residential Future Land Use designations, in accordance with the following:

(1)         Ratios of residential dwelling units to non-residential floor area shall be specified in the Land Development Code for mixed use development in accordance with this policy. The mixed use ratios will allow for existing commercial, office, or institutional uses within one-quarter mile of proposed residential development to be used in calculating the allowable number of residential units.

(2)         Residential uses in mixed use development in accordance with this policy shall be physically and functionally integrated with existing or proposed non-residential uses.

(c)         Within residential Future Land Use designations in Activity Centers, commercial, office, or institutional uses shall be allowable as part of mixed use developments, Traditional Neighborhood Developments, or Transit Oriented Developments.

(d)         Development projects which exceed minimum size thresholds shall be required to provide a mix of residential and non-residential uses.  Minimum thresholds for acreage and non-residential floor area shall be established in the Land Development Code.

Policy 2.1.5      Development within Activity Centers shall be designed to produce compact, pedestrian-oriented, mixed use development which is integrated within the surrounding community.  Architectural and site design techniques shall be used to define pedestrian and public space and to provide human scale with the Activity Center. At a minimum, Activity Center sites and buildings shall achieve the following:

(a)         Land uses shall be organized around centralized public civic spaces, with pedestrian and bicycle routes connecting civic spaces to development within and surrounding the Activity Center.

(b)         Development shall be organized along a density and intensity gradient that takes into account surrounding land uses and existing and planned multimodal transportation corridors.  The highest density and intensity development shall be located within walking distance of public civic spaces and existing or planned transit facilities.

(c)         Activity Centers shall be organized into an interconnected network of streets and blocks which minimizes walking distance between buildings and land uses.  A range of average block perimeters shall be specified in the Land Development Code which take into account the level of the Activity Center, proposed land uses, and the availability of existing or planned transit service.  Average block perimeters shall generally be smaller in areas located within walking distance of existing or planned transit service.  Larger blocks shall be required to provide mid-block pedestrian connections. 

(d)         Primary public entrances to buildings shall front adjacent public streets with sidewalks or a civic space; primary public entrances to buildings shall also be connected with the surrounding public sidewalk network.

(e)         Buildings shall be oriented to define the street edge in developed areas. Landscaping and street trees shall be used to define the street edge in open space areas.

(f)          Vistas created by street terminations within the Activity Center shall incorporate significant buildings or places to the maximum extent possible.

(g)         Shaded areas and protection from the elements for pedestrians shall be provided as part of the streetscape within developed areas.

(h)         Building facades shall provide variation in materials, roof lines, window patterns and reliefs.  Multiple-story buildings shall articulate the division between the ground floor and upper floors.  Minimum percentages of transparent glass on the facade of buildings shall be established in the Land Development Code.

(i)          A series of smaller, well defined customer entrances shall be used to break up long facades and provide pedestrian scale and variety.  This may be achieved through the use of liner buildings.

(j)          Maximum building setbacks or build-to lines shall be established in the Land Development Code which allow sufficient space for pedestrian facilities and amenities, street trees, and utilities.  Setbacks may be wider where a courtyard, plaza, public space or seating is provided as part of the streetscape in developed areas.

Policy 2.1.6      Activity Centers shall include a multimodal street network which provides interconnectivity of land uses within and surrounding the Activity Center. 

(a)         Activity Centers shall be organized into an interconnected network of streets and blocks in accordance with Policy 2.1.5.c.

(b)         The internal street network shall include a pedestrian and bicycle circulation system that interconnects all land uses, including residential, non-residential, parks, plazas, squares, and open spaces. Primary pedestrian and bicycle paths shall avoid routes through parking, loading, and delivery areas.

(c)         Points of individual driveway ingress to and egress from the Activity Center to the arterial and collector roads system shall be minimized.  Common access driveways and shared use public streets shall be utilized to the greatest extent feasible.

(d)         The street system shall provide multiple automobile, bicycle, and pedestrian linkages from the Activity Center to surrounding development as an alternative to arterial and collector roads system, except where such connections are precluded by the physical layout of existing development or environmental features.

(e)         Automobile-oriented uses shall have a limited number of driveways, and drive-in or drive-up windows shall be located to minimize conflict with pedestrian and bicycle traffic.

(f)          Pedestrian facilities shall be provided on both sides of all streets within the right-of-way.  Streets providing access to single-family detached units may provide a multi-use path parallel to the street as an alternative to sidewalks, consistent with the Transportation Mobility Element.

(g)         Street furniture, planters, trash receptacles and lighting shall be provided as part of the streetscape in non-residential and mixed use areas.

(h)         One-way streets shall be allowable as a means to reduce crossing distances and conflicts, impervious surfaces, and right-of way widths.

(i)          Developments contiguous to an Express Transit Corridor as provided on the Express Transit Corridors Map shall provide either site related turn out facilities (bus bays) consistent with stop spacing standards, or dedicated lane(s) as part of the development plan.  

(j)          Developments contiguous to a Rapid Transit Corridor as provided on the Rapid Transit Corridors Map shall dedicate the necessary right-of-way proportionate to the impacts of the development.  Transit Oriented Developments and Traditional Neighborhood Developments shall provide dedicated facilities consistent with Future Land Use Element Policy1.6.7.11.

(k)         Street design standards shall be provided in the Land Development Code and shall address narrow pavement and right-of-way widths, turning radii, on-street parking, other design criteria for roads, alleys and lanes, and Low Impact Design (LID) techniques for urban green streets. Standards shall promote walking and biking, ensure pedestrian and bicyclist safety, and allow for emergency and transit access.

Policy 2.1.7      Parking areas shall be designed to minimize intrusiveness and impacts on pedestrian circulation and accessibility to development through the following techniques:

(a)         On-street parking shall be included in developments in order to provide traffic calming and produce a comfortable and safe pedestrian environment.

(b)         Structured parking shall be encouraged in all Activity Centers in order to promote the efficient use of land and a compact development pattern.

(c)         Large expanses of contiguous off-street parking areas which discourage pedestrian access to development shall be prohibited.  Where off-street surface parking lots are included in a development, the preferred location shall be interior to blocks or to the rear of buildings, with a limited number of access points from the adjacent street.  Off-street surface parking lots may be located on the interior side of buildings, subject to limitations and design criteria to be specified in the Land Development Code.  Off-street surface parking lots shall generally not be located between buildings and adjacent pedestrian areas such as storefront streets and public squares.

(d)         Off-street surface parking lots shall be screened from streets, sidewalks, and open spaces.

(e)         Parking lots or structures shall be designed with safe and convenient pedestrian connections to business and residential entrances and public space to create a park-once environment.

Policy 2.1.8      Stormwater management facilities shall be sufficient to serve the functional purpose, and shall be designed as a public amenity that provides usable open space or an aesthetic feature that resembles natural areas. The use of shared stormwater facilities shall be evaluated as part of the development plan process, and utilized to the extent feasible.  Low Impact Design (LID) techniques for stormwater management are required in the Sensitive Karst Areas and encouraged Countywide.

Policy 2.1.9      Development plans which are consistent with Comprehensive Plan Objective 2.1 and Policies 2.1.1 through 2.1.8, and are consistent with other provisions of the Comprehensive Plan, and the Land Development Code standards for Activity Centers described in this policy, shall be allowable through the development plan review process, notwithstanding conflicting provisions in the specific activity center plans contained in Policies 2.5.1 through 2.5.9 of this Element.

Policy 2.1.10   The County shall initiate master plans for Activity Centers where necessary to promote redevelopment in accordance with Objective 2.1 and Policies 2.1.1 through 2.1.8.  An Activity Center master plan shall include a generalized site plan for the entire Activity Center with related policies and standards to address allowable land uses, site and building design, transportation circulation and connectivity, parking, natural resource protection, public civic space, stormwater management facilities, and specific redevelopment considerations.  Activity Center master plans shall include a public participation process incorporating neighborhood meetings or charrettes, notice to property owners, and other components. The County shall explore potential opportunities for public/private partnerships in developing Activity Center master plans. 

Master plans for Activity Centers shall include the following components:

(a)         A range of permitted land uses, residential densities, and non-residential intensity standards.

(b)         Dimensional standards for building height, scale, and orientation relative to adjacent streets.

(c)         Parking standards which establish maximum limits on parking for various land uses, and include opportunities for shared parking arrangements where adjacent land uses within a mixed use area have different peak usage hours.

(d)         Identification of conservation areas to be protected in accordance with the Conservation and Open Space Element.

(e)         Identification of the location and function of roads, bicycle routes, pedestrian routes, and transit facilities within the development site, and interconnections of these transportation facilities with the surrounding existing and planned transportation network.

(f)          Provision of a range of housing types and sizes to provide for affordable housing.

Policy 2.1.11   Transit Oriented Developments meeting the requirements of Section 1.7 of the Future Land Use Element and Traditional Neighborhood Developments meeting the requirements of Section 1.6 of the Future Land Use Element are allowed within Activity Centers, notwithstanding any conflicting provisions in Policies 2.1.1 through 2.1.10 of this Element.   Any Transit Oriented Development or Traditional Neighborhood Development shall be consistent with natural resource protection policies adopted as part of specific Activity Center Plans in Section 2.2 of the Future Land Use Element or in other elements of the Comprehensive Plan.

Policy 2.1.12   New activity centers and expansion of the boundaries of existing activity centers shall require a Comprehensive Plan Amendment to establish the Activity Center boundaries and level in the Comprehensive Plan.  Such Comprehensive Plan Amendments shall be considered based on the following:

(a)         Location of new activity centers shall generally be near intersections of multi-modal corridors, and sites shall be adequately sized to allow development of a mix of non-residential and residential land uses, while providing for integration and interconnectivity with existing and future neighborhoods.

(b)         Availability and capacity of urban services and infrastructure including multimodal transportation, recreation, potable water and sanitary sewer, public schools, solid waste disposal, stormwater management, and public safety.

OBJECTIVE 2.2 – ACTIVITY CENTER PLANS

Development occurring within designated Activity Centers shall be consistent with the applicable policies and standards contained in this section and with Policies 2.1.4 - 2.1.12.

Policy 2.2.1      Activity Center Plan – Springhills

(a)                                      Land Use

(1)         Commercial mixed uses should be limited to the areas designated on the Activity Center Plan Map and shopping center should be developed in accordance with the standards of Sections 3.5, 3.6. and 3.7. of the Future Land Use Element. Tourist and entertainment areas shown on the Plan map should be restricted to retail commercial activities associated with a transient clientele. Limited retail and service commercial        uses should be permitted in warehouse and distribution areas and in office areas where such retail uses are clearly accessory to and related to the principal uses or where the retail uses are provided to serve the businesses and employees within the development. Such retail uses shall be located internal to the development with no exposure outside the development being served. Floor area ratios (FAR) for office, warehouse/distribution and commercial uses shall not exceed 1.0 except as otherwise established herein.

a.           The Springhills Activity Center shall be designated a High Activity Center/Retail which shall have commercial activities as its primary use and office, residential, warehouse/distribution and institutional as secondary uses providing they are compatible with primary uses.  The scale of these activities may be at a regional level of 300,000 - 1,000,000 sq. ft. gross leasable area or more.

b.           No regional mall shopping center, defined as a regional center with 300,000 - 1,000,000 square feet or more of retail usually enclosed (but not always) with an inward orientation of the stores connected by a common walkway with parking surrounding the outside perimeters,  shall be permitted within this Activity Center.  Rather, equivalent concentrations of a mix of commercial, office, residential, warehouse/distribution, and institutional activities shall be permitted.  Source: International Council of Shopping Centers.

(2)         Parcel number 06041-003-000 shall permit a medical campus including  “HM” type uses.  Development within the area (SantaFe Village) designated ‘Mixed Use’ in the northeast quadrant of the Activity Center (Tax Parcel Numbers 06041-002-002, 06041-002-003, 06041-002-005) shall be a Transit Oriented Development providing a compact, mixed-use (both horizontally and vertically), pedestrian and bicycle friendly community designed with the densities and intensities needed to support transit service, reduce per capita greenhouse gas emissions enabling individuals to live, work, play and shop without the need to rely on a motor vehicle as the only means of mobility.  Development shall be allowed through Development Plan approval. Development Plan approval shall adhere to the following standards:

a.           General Requirements: The SantaFe Village Transit Oriented Development shall include:

1.           A village center and transit supportive area with the necessary densities to support transit services; and

2.           Compact, horizontal and vertical mixed-use development to allow for the internal capture of pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular trips; and

3.           A pedestrian and bicycle friendly environment that encourages walking and bicycling as a primary means of mobility within the development,

4.           A gridded street network that emanates from the village center that allows for multiple route choices, reduces the distance between uses to encourage walking and biking, and connects with adjacent developments,

5.           Funding for express transit service as provided in the Capital Improvements Element,  

6.           On-street parking and screening of off-street surface parking.

b.           Village Center and Transit Supportive Area: The SantaFe Village Transit Oriented Development shall include:

1.           One or more village centers with:

i.            a transit station(s) that is safe, comfortable and convenient for its intended users, in close proximity to retail uses and of sufficient size to accommodate persons expected to live, work and shop within the development; and

ii.           a compact, definable vertical and horizontal mixed use, pedestrian and bicycle friendly area served by transit; and

iii.          multiple destinations and reasons for pedestrians and bicyclist to frequent the area; and

iv.          community gathering spaces, such as plazas, squares and open spaces designed to attract pedestrians and bicyclists and serve as the focal point of the development, appropriately sized to maintain urban character, pedestrian scale and proportional with the typical block length within the village center; and

v.           one or more central point(s) located in a plaza, square, open space or denoted by an architecturally significant feature from which policies related to the measurements of  the village center(s) and the transit supportive area(s) are derived; and

vi.          an area or areas generally limited to 1/8 mile radius in size utilizing a block or radial pattern, measured from the central point; and

vii.         a primary orientation that is internal to the development; and

viii.        a minimum residential density of (10) units per acres; and

ix.          a maximum density of (24) units per acres; and

x.           a minimum of fifty (50) percent of the non-residential uses authorized for the entire Santa Fe Village Transit Oriented Development.

2.           A transit supportive area, located outside the village center or village centers and within ¼ mile of the central point from which policies related to the measurements of village centers and transit supportive areas are derived, that:

i.            has a minimum of seven (7) units per acres; and

ii.           has a maximum density of (24) units per acres; and

3.           A minimum of 10,000 square feet of non-residential use, plus a minimum of 100 square feet and maximum of 400 square feet of non-residential uses for each residential unit within the combined areas of the village center(s) and transit supportive area(s).  To encourage infill and redevelopment, the square footage of existing non-residential within the site may either be utilized to meet the minimum non-residential requirement or added to the maximum allowed non-residential square footage.

4.           A minimum of 20% of the non-residential use within the combined areas of the village center(s) and transit supportive area(s) shall be commercial retail.

5.           A minimum of 20% of the non-residential use within the combined areas of the village center(s) and transit supportive area(s) shall be within vertically mixed structures.

6.           To provide for a mixture of non-residential uses at a pedestrian friendly scale, no more than 70% of any block frontage shall be occupied by a single non-residential occupancy.

7.           Non-residential uses shall be phased with the residential component of the development during the Development Plan review process requiring that not less than 50% of each such allowed uses, excluding civic uses, are constructed within each phase before subsequent phases may be approved.

8.           Single occupant retail uses 50,000 square feet or greater shall provide:                           

i.            Separate liner buildings oriented towards a street on at least three (3) sides of the use with the rear of the building either fronting parking or lined by buildings, or

ii.           Contain a vertical mixture of uses with at least one (1) story above the ground floor, or

iii.          Multiple floors with a maximum of 50,000 square feet per floor, or

iv.          Provide parking on top of the building.

c.                  The Santa Fe Village Transit Oriented Development may include:

1.                  A mixture of residential, commercial retail, office, financial, institutional, lodging, medical, research and development, clean/green technology, religious and civic uses anywhere within the site.

2.           A range of housing options to provide opportunities for a variety of residents of various ages and income levels to reside within the same community. Single-family detached, single-family attached, multi-family, assisted and independent living facilities are all allowable residential uses. The number of rooms for lodging or hotel uses may be counted as residential units for the purposes of calculating non-residential square footage allowances.  Assisted and independent living facilities may be counted either toward residential or non-residential square footage allowances.

3.           Mixed uses, both horizontal and vertical, shall be allowed and are encouraged within all buildings at any location within the site.

4.           The square footage of civic uses such as places of worship, libraries, schools and live-work studios may be excluded from the calculation of the maximum non-residential requirement provided that these uses are functionally integrated into the development, are located within the transit supportive area, and allow for shared parking during hours of non use.

d.           The SantaFe Village Transit Oriented Development shall adhere to the following site design requirements:

1.           Site and building design and scale shall be oriented towards creating a pedestrian, bicycle and transit friendly environment. Architectural and site design techniques shall be used to promote walkable and bikeable communities.

2.           The site layout and orientation of buildings shall create a development that is designed around the pedestrian and bicyclist and creates an environment that promotes walking and bicycling as a primary means of mobility. The following are the primary components of creating a pedestrian and bicycle friendly environment:

i.            An interconnected network of pedestrian and bicycle facilities,

ii.           Shade and protection from the elements,

iii.          Limited distances between attractors and generators,

iv.          Vertical and horizontal mixture of uses, and

v.           Visual interest through site and building design and orientation.

3.           Building design and placement shall be at a pedestrian scale with primary entrances located at the front of the building oriented towards a public space such as a street, park, plaza or square. Shade shall be provided for pedestrians through means such as covered walkways, terraces, balconies, awnings and street trees. Limited exceptions may be allowed for residential and lodging uses that have a portion of units fronting a parking area located interior to a block.

4.           Buildings shall be oriented to visually define the street edge.  Landscaping and street trees shall be utilized to define the street edge along open spaces.

5.           Non-residential uses shall have minimal setbacks from a street right-of-way, so long as adequate space is provided for pedestrian facilities, amenities and street trees. Setbacks may be wider if a courtyard, plaza, public space or seating is provided between the building and the sidewalk. Outdoor seating is encouraged and allowed for non-residential uses.

6.           All residential and non-residential uses shall require architectural design review once standards and procedures for such review are established in the Land Development Regulations (LDR’s) providing for:

i.            Flexibility in design, allowing for choice and variety in architectural style, building facades with variation in materials, roof lines, window patterns and reliefs.

ii.           Objective, measurable criteria including size, scale, proportion, and materials.

iii.          A prohibition of large expanses of solid wall fronting a street.

iv.          Minimum percentages of transparent glass on the façade of buildings.

v.           The preferred location of above ground utilities, except for life safety, to the rear and side of buildings with above ground utility access, transfer and conveyance points such as panels, boxes, meters, and valves screened from the street and sidewalks through architectural features and/or landscaping.

vi.          Placement of all recycling and trash collection for non-residential, multi-family and single family attached uses, screened and placed at the rear of buildings or within parking facilities.

7.           Underground utilities are encouraged to be compressed to minimize ROW width, allow adequate space for street trees and provide for the visual definition of the street.

e.           Transportation:  The SantaFe Village Transit Oriented Development shall adhere to the following transportation design requirements:             

1.           The transportation network shall be designed as a continuous interconnected network of narrow streets, including a pedestrian and bicycle circulation system, designed to calm traffic speeds and encourage walking and bicycling throughout the development, provide connectivity, and functionally and physically integrate the various uses within and beyond the neighborhood to reduce the distances of travel between uses and promote the internal capture of trips, reduce impact on external roadways, and promote transit use.

2.           The street network shall be designed to create smaller block lengths.

3.           Perimeter block lengths shall not exceed 1,300 linear feet within the village center, 1,600 linear feet within the transit supportive area outside of the village center, and 2,000 linear feet outside the transit supportive area.

4.           Perimeter blocks lengths with parking provided in the interior of the block shall not exceed 2,000 linear feet in the village center, 2,300 linear feet within the transit supportive area outside of the village center, and 2,700 linear feet outside the transit supportive area.

5.           Perimeter block lengths may be extended an additional 700 linear feet so long as parking is provided interior to the block, and a safe, convenient, landscaped, mid-block pedestrian and bicycle path consistent with block lengths in subparagraph d. above is provided.

6.           Perimeter block lengths may be extended up to 3,000 linear feet where a multi-level parking structure or single occupant retail use greater than 25,000 square feet are located, so long as parking is provided interior to the block, and a safe, convenient, landscaped pedestrian and bicycle path consistent with block lengths in subparagraph d. above is provided.

7.           The length of environmental, physical, topographic and property boundary constraints are allowed to be used to meet perimeter block length requirements.   

8.                                 Interconnectivity for vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists shall be provided between uses. Access may be limited for independent / assisted living facilities in order to provide for the safety and security of residents. 

9.           Street design standards shall address narrow pavement and right-of-way widths, turning radii, on-street parking, and other design criteria for roads, alleys and lanes. Standards shall promote walking and biking, ensure pedestrian and bicyclists safety, and allow for emergency and transit access. Urban green streets and Low Impact Development (LID) techniques are allowed and encouraged. 

10.         Cross-access for vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists shall be provided to adjacent developed and undeveloped land. Exceptions may be made for environmental, topographical, or physical constraints.

11.         The street network shall include a pedestrian and bicycle circulation system that interconnects all uses, including parks, plaza, squares and open spaces.

12.         The streetscape within the village center shall where appropriate, require street furniture, planters, location maps, signage, trash receptacles and pedestrian level lighting along streets. The streetscape shall be compatible with regards to sidewalk materials, streetlights, cross-walks, signage, benches, and pedestrian amenities.

13.         Pedestrian facilities shall be provided on both sides of all streets within the right-of-way. The width of pedestrian facilities shall increase as densities and intensities increase. The widest pedestrian facilities shall be provided adjacent to non-residential and mixed-use buildings. Streets providing access to single-family detached units shall have the option of providing a multi-use path parallel to the streets in-lieu of sidewalks consistent with provisions in the Transportation Mobility Element.  

14.         One-way streets are allowed with reduced right-of-way widths.

15.         Street trees shall be provided along all streets.

16.         The Applicant shall be responsible for the dedication of right-of-way and the design, engineering and construction of a roadway corridor and a multi-use bicycle and pedestrian path that connects the existing county right-of-way on the eastern property boundary to the western property boundary in an alignment to be determined during the Development Plan review process.

17.         The Applicant shall be responsible for the dedication of right-of-way and the design, engineering and construction of dedicated transit lanes that connects the existing county right-of-way on the eastern property boundary to the western property boundary in an alignment to be determined during the Development Plan review process.  The dedicated transit lanes shall be within or contiguous to the village center(s). A multi-lane roadway in-lieu of dedicated transit lanes may be provided within the transit supportive and village center area if required by the Board of County Commissioners or the developer can demonstrate that future transit headways of 10 minutes can be maintained and feature either block lengths that average 300 feet or less or include fixed guide-way rail lines. Regional Transit System (RTS) shall be a reviewing entity along with the County and FDOT along State roadways.

18.         The Applicant shall provide a park and ride facility within close proximity to, or adjacent to, the transit station. Park and ride facilities shall be designed for shared evening and weekend use by the development. Park and rides shall be designed in accordance with block, street tree and pedestrian facility requirements of this Element and are encouraged to be screened by liner buildings. Regional Transit System (RTS) shall be a reviewing entity along with the County and FDOT along State roadways.

19.         The following off-site transportation improvements and services are required:

i.                          The applicant shall be responsible for the design and construction of a roadway and dedicated transit lanes that connect the existing northern terminus of NW 83rd Street at NW 39th Avenue to an appropriate connection point on the eastern property boundary of the SantaFe Village site. The applicant shall also be responsible for off-site intersection turn lanes at NW 83rd Street and NW 39th Avenue if determined during the Development Plan review process to be warranted for operational and safety reasons. This requirement shall not be interpreted to require improvements needed to maintain the applicable adopted roadway level of service standard.   

ii.           The applicant shall also be responsible for off-site intersection turn lanes at NW 91st Street and NW 39th Avenue if determined during the Development Plan review process to be warranted for operational and safety reasons. This requirement shall not be interpreted to require improvements needed to maintain the applicable adopted roadway level of service standard.

iii.          The applicant, as required by Alachua County, shall design, engineer and construct a local two (2) lane roadway with bike lanes and a multi-use path within County owned right-of-way that connects Millhopper Road with an internal roadway(s) along the northern portion of the SantaFe Village site. The roadway shall be designed in an environmentally friendly manner with and traffic calming and low impact development features.  A round-a-bout or turn lanes and signalization shall be provided at the intersection with Millhopper Road provided the applicable warrants or justification can be met. The Applicant shall demonstrate via the internal street network that the roadway will provide for connectivity and not through vehicular movements.

iv.          The applicant shall design, engineer and construct a multi-use path along the eastern property boundary within or adjacent to county-owned right-of-way from NW 39th Avenue to Millhopper Road. The multi-use path shall connect to the existing multi-use path on NW 83rd Street south of NW 39th Avenue.   

v.           The applicant must comply with the requirements for Projects that Promote Public Transportation contained in Transportation Mobility Element Policies 1.2.10 – 1.2.13. In furtherance of this requirement the site must be served with public transit with 15-minute peak hour headways and 25-minute headways or frequencies during the non-peak hours with said service connecting from SantaFe Village, through Santa Fe College and the Oaks Mall. The transit service with the headways identified above shall extend to the University of Florida as contributions from other developments, Santa Fe College and additional funding sources become available.

vi.          Dedicated transit lanes connecting NW 39th Avenue to NW 23rd Avenue shall be constructed by the developer of SantaFe Village, using existing county owned right-of-way, or areas within the Santa Fe College campus if allowed by the College and acceptable to the County, and said dedicated transit lanes shall connect with dedicated or shared transit lanes that are required to be constructed within Santa Fe Village.

vii.         Funding for capital and operating costs for the required transit route shall be assured, in part, through establishment of a Community Development District (CDD) or other appropriate funding mechanism on the parcels covered by this Policy. The CDD, or other appropriate funding mechanism, shall be established in conjunction with approval of the first Development Plan. A developer’s agreement shall be entered between the County and developer of the site prior to approval of a Development Plan, addressing details of the development phasing schedule and the level of the funding commitments of the CDD, or other appropriate funding mechanism, to the required transit. The funding for transit operations shall be assured for fifteen years. The annual contribution shall be indexed for inflation.

f.            Stormwater Management: The SantaFe Village Transit Oriented Development shall adhere to the following transportation design requirements:

Surface stormwater management facilities shall be designed to provide physical and visual amenity value to the Activity Center. Such facilities should be designed, where practicable and appropriate to the urban context, to provide useable open space designed to resemble natural areas. Low impact development methods shall be used where feasible and appropriate recognizing that not all LID techniques are appropriate for highly urbanized areas. The Applicant shall demonstrate at Development Plan review that a responsible entity (e.g., community development district, developer and/or owner’s association) will permanently provide for proper maintenance of the LID functional landscape. Hydrologic functions of storage, infiltration, and ground water recharge, plus discharge volume and frequency shall be maintained by integrated and distributed micro-scale stormwater retention and detention areas, by the reduction of impervious surfaces, and by the lengthening of flow paths and runoff time.  LID strategies include, but are not limited to, the preservation/protection of environmentally sensitive site features such as uplands, wetlands, wetland buffers and flood plains. Such practices may include, but are not limited to:

1.           Development that adheres to the principles of “New Urbanism” or “Traditional Neighborhood Development”.

2.           Clustering of development.

3.           Bioretention areas or ‘rain gardens.’

4.           Vegetated swales

5.           Permeable pavements

6.           Redirecting rooftop runoff to functional landscape areas, rain barrels, cisterns, vaults and treatment train facilities.

7.           Narrowing street widths to the minimum width required to support traffic, on-street parking where appropriate, and emergency vehicle access.

8.           Elimination of curb and gutter where appropriate.

9.           Minimization of impervious surfaces through use of shared driveways and parking lots, or consolidation of parking in multi-level structures.

10.         Reduction in impervious driveways through reduced building setbacks.

11.         Reduction in street paving by providing reduced street frontages for lots.

12.         Permanent educational programs to ensure that future owners and residents of the site have an opportunity to fully understand the purpose, function, and maintenance of each LID component.

13.         Limitations on the amount of turf allowed within the site and standards for implementation of best management practices for such turf, including minimum fertilizer applications.

14.         Reuse of stormwater.

15.         Use of “Florida Friendly” plant species and preferably native species for landscaping.

16.         Use of low-volume irrigation technologies and soil moisture sensors if potable water supply is used for irrigation.

g.           Parking:  The SantaFe Village Transit Oriented Development shall adhere to the following parking design requirements:

1.           To promote a walkable, urban scale environment, off-street parking shall be significantly limited and designed in such a manner as to not be visible from the street. Parking areas shall be designed to minimize intrusiveness through the following techniques:

i.            Innovative solutions to reduce parking requirements, decoupling parking from residential uses, provision of shared parking to serve multiple uses and alternative paving materials are allowed. Reduced landscaped requirements may be allowed for off-street parking provided interior to blocks.

ii.           On-street parking is allowed throughout the development. On-street parking is required on the majority of streets within the transit supportive area. Angled on-street parking shall be accessed via a drive aisle separated from through traffic by a landscaped median on roadways with a projected AADT greater than 5,000 trips.   

iii.          Off-street parking, except for ingress and egress, shall be located to the rear of buildings and shall be screened from streets and sidewalks, via liner buildings. Densely landscaped, pedestrian friendly squares and plazas may be allowed between liner buildings. A dense landscaped buffer with a multi-use pedestrian and bicycle facility may be utilized along one side of the off-street parking. Off-street parking adjacent to open space or an environmental, topographical, physical or property boundary constraint may be lined by either buildings or a dense landscaped buffer with a multi-use pedestrian and bicycle facility. 

iv.          Off-street parking shall clearly delineate routes for pedestrians and bicycles through parking areas to accommodate safe and convenient pedestrian and bicycle circulation between uses and create a park-once environment.

v.           Vehicular use areas, other than off-street parking, shall be located along the side and rear of a building. Limited exceptions may be allowed for loading areas within drive aisles provided as part of on-street parking separated from through traffic by a median.  

vi.          Single-family and townhome garages shall be located at the rear or side of the building. Exceptions shall be allowed to address environmental, topographical, physical or property boundary constraints. 

vii.         A single transitionary off-street parking area may be allowed. The perimeter block length shall not exceed the perimeter block length requirements of subparagraphs 5.d through f. above. Sidewalks and street trees shall be provided along the entire perimeter block length. Plans shall be submitted demonstrating the liner buildings to be provided at a future date along with justification why the additional parking is needed and why it cannot be provided elsewhere.

viii.        Single occupant retail uses along NW 39th Avenue that are greater than 25,000 square feet per floor may have parking in front of buildings so long as all surface parking and the side and rear of the building are screened from adjacent streets by liner buildings.  The rear of the building for single occupant retail uses between 25,000 and 50,000 square feet per floor may front a street so long as a functional entrance is provided and the architecture of the building provides a pedestrian friendly environment and complies with all design requirements for buildings fronting a street. 

2.           If at Development Plan review the entire SantaFe Village Transit Oriented Development is projected to produce more than 2,000 cumulative peak hour trips, 50% of all required parking within the Village Center(s) shall be provided via parking structures and on-street parking.

3.           Non-residential uses shall be provided on the exterior of the 1st floor of any parking structure fronting a street, except for parking structures surrounded by liner buildings.

(3)         Areas designated as warehouse/distribution shall be used for office, warehousing, distribution, and light assembly activities. No outside storage shall be permitted except in fully enclosed areas, including areas which are fenced and screened with appropriate landscaping.  Warehouse and distribution uses include activities such as wholesaling, storage, distribution establishments (includes heavy usage of single unit trucks for distribution), light manufacturing, processing, food processing (not a slaughter house), packaging, fabricating, printing, lithographing, publishing, research laboratories, and experimental laboratories.

(4)         Buffering of land use activities shall be consistent with the activity center map and with zoning regulations. Additional buffering may be required to separate or screen different uses, or to protect areas needed for future right-of-way needed for potential transportation improvements as determined by the DRC on a site‑by‑site basis.

(5)         That area lying on the south side of N.W. 39th Avenue, between N.W. 98th Street and N.W. 97th Court and within 350' to 500' of 39th Avenue shall be designated for Tourist/Entertainment uses as described in Section 3.10.  It is the intent of this policy that businesses oriented to highway travelers, including automobile-oriented uses and gasoline stations, be concentrated in this area to benefit from the exposure to 39th Avenue. The following standards shall govern development within this area:

a.           Setbacks of twenty‑five (25) feet shall be maintained along N.W. 39th Avenue and along N.W. 98th Street. It is the intent that these setbacks be landscaped and that parking areas not be permitted to intrude into setback areas.

b.           All uses developed in this area shall have a maximum Floor Area Ratio (FAR) of 1.

c.           Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 2.6.1.2., a single entrance may be permitted along 39th Avenue to serve this area. Such entrance may be located no closer to either 97th Court or 98th Street than 330 feet, and shall be subject to review by the DRC. In reviewing any proposed entrance along 39th Avenue, the DRC shall find that the entrance, when reviewed according to good principles of traffic engineering and when considered in light of grades and traffic needs along 39th Avenue, shall not pose a problem for traffic circulation along 39th Avenue.  All measurements concerning the spacing between intersections and/or entrances shall refer to the spacing between centerlines.

d.           In addition to any consideration of an entrance to 39th Avenue between 98th Street and 97th Court, consideration may be given to permitting a corresponding cut in any future median along 39th Avenue.  Prior to making any determination of the appropriateness of allowing a median cut, a functional plan shall be prepared for 39th Avenue from 83rd Street to 1/4 mile west of 98th Street and shall be reviewed by the Board of County Commissioners.  Consideration shall be given to expected traffic volumes and turning movements along 39th Avenue, and to the projected level of development expected within the Activity Center.

(6)         That area lying between N.W. 98th Street and N.W. 97th Court, and between 350' to 500' and 1000' south of N.W. 39th Avenue shall be designated for Neighborhood Convenience Commercial uses as described in Section 3.8, or Office uses as described in Section 3.9. It is the intent of this policy that those businesses which are oriented to the resident population be located away from 39th Avenue.  Tourist/Entertainment uses, including restaurants and automobile-oriented uses such as gasoline stations and convenience stores selling gasoline, are specifically not permitted within the neighborhood convenience area.  The following standards shall govern development within this area:

a.           Setbacks of twenty‑five (25) feet shall be maintained along N.W. 98th Street. It is the intent that these setbacks be landscaped and that parking areas not be permitted to intrude into setback areas.

b.           All uses developed in this area shall have a maximum Floor Area Ratio (FAR) of .25 to 1.

c.           Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 2.2.1.2., not more than three entrances may be located along the east side of 98th Street with the centerline of the most northerly entrance not closer than 330 feet from the centerline of 39th Avenue.  Where possible, shared entrances between individual parcels shall be encouraged.

(7)         The area identified as institutional in the southwest quadrant shall permit institutional or residential land uses according to the policies and standards contained in the Plan.

(8)         The development standards for the Warehouse/Distribution area in the southwest quadrant shall be as follows:

a.           Lots fronting on N.W. 97th Boulevard or NW 97th Court extension shall have a front setback of 25 feet.

b.           All uses developed in this area shall have a maximum Floor Area Ratio of .35 to 1.

(9)         The following buffers shall be required:

a.           A buffer shall be maintained along the I-75 right-of-way, at depths to be determined on a site-by-site basis by the Board of County Commissioners and shall provide visual and acoustical separation.

b.           All the non-residential land lying within the Activity Center abutting residential land lying outside the Activity Center shall maintain a buffer of at least 50 feet.   As it pertains to the southern 50-foot buffer of the Southwest Quadrant, between the Warehouse and Institutional land uses within the Activity Center and the residential area located outside the Activity Center, the DRC shall evaluate the need for a larger buffer between these areas at such time as the property within the Activity Center is presented for site plan review.

c.           The Institutional area and the Office area along Northwest 98th Street in the southwest quadrant shall have a buffer of at least 25 feet, except for ingress/egress points.

(10)      No parking, storage, trash receptacles, or mechanical or utility equipment may be located between any building and I-75, unless approved with appropriate screening on a site-by-site basis during development review.  Only one sign identifying the property in question may be located between any building and I-75, or may be attached to any building facing I-75.  More than one sign may be attached to a shopping center facing I-75 if approved on a site-by-site basis during development review.  In administering these buffer standards or requiring additional buffering, the Development Review Committee and the Board of County Commissioners shall consider the need for visual and acoustical separation for residential use and noise attenuation and shall consider the effectiveness of existing vegetation.

(11)      Conservation areas shown on the Activity Center Land Use Plan are not to scale.  These areas shall be field-located at the time of development review.

(12)      The conservation area separating single-family residential land use from Warehouse/Distribution uses in the northeast quadrant shall be treated as an overlay district.  This property may contain environmentally sensitive areas.  During site plan review, the applicant shall be required to submit plans, soil borings, and other necessary information to determine if there are any environmentally sensitive areas.  If so found, these areas shall remain designated Conservation.  If not, development may occur utilizing the normal buffer requirements.

(13)      Development of Regional Impact (DRI) approved after the effective date of Ordinance 90-3 shall be consistent with the adopted Alachua County Comprehensive Plan.

(14)      The Activity Center concept is intended to incorporate a broad mixture of uses under specific design standards approved by the Board of County Commissioners.

(15)      The land area at the intersection of Northwest 39th Avenue and Northwest 91st Street shown as office shall be developed under the following standards:

a.           Setbacks

1.           25 feet from Northwest 39th Avenue

2.           50 feet from the east property line

b.           Maximum Floor Area Ratio of .50.

c.           Landscaping shall occur along all parcel road frontage.  A 25' wide medium density buffer of canopy and understory trees shall be required within the 50' wide setback along the eastern property line.  Additional buffering may be required to screen non-residential uses from residential uses.

d.           Access to this parcel shall be limited to a single entrance on either  Northwest 39th Avenue or Northwest 91st Street.  The DRC shall review the location of the proposed access point with respect to adopted access criteria and make recommendations at the time of site plan approval.

(16)      The land area located in the northwest quadrant of the project, north of   NW 39th Avenue and west of NW 98th Street extension shown as office shall be developed under the following standards:                         

a.           Setback

1.           50 feet from the conservation area to the east

2.           25 feet from Northwest 39th Avenue

3.           50 feet from the west property line

b.           Maximum Floor Area Ratio of .35, with a maximum building height of two stories.

c.           Landscaping shall occur along the parcel road frontage.  Every effort shall be made to incorporate the mature vegetation, where possible into the overall design.  A 25' wide low density buffer of canopy and understory trees shall be required within the 50' wide setback along the western property line.

d.           Access to this parcel shall occur primarily from inside the project via an extension of Northwest 98th Street.  In addition, the parcel shall be permitted a right turn access along the Northwest 39th Avenue frontage.  The DRC shall review the location of this proposal access point with respect to adopted access criteria and make recommendations at the time of site plan approval.

(b)         Transportation

(1)         The developer of any area within the Activity Center shall be responsible for the construction of the internal streets and transportation system at the time of the development of the contiguous land areas. Where improvements provide access to adjoining parcels of land not under the same ownership, the owners and/or developers of the land shall be cooperatively responsible for internal street and transportation system improvements. The County may consider the establishment of special assessment districts where necessary in order to provide for internal streets/transportation system serving more than one property owner.

(2)         Access to 39th Avenue, 98th Street, and 91st Street shall be limited to the points indicated on the Activity Center Plan map.  Additional driveway access may be considered by the County as part of a properly designed block meeting applicable TND/TOD design criteria.  Existing development (i.e. entrances approved as of December 1, 1984), may continue to have other access to these roads, but shall provide for alternate access in the event the property is redeveloped or the use of the property is expanded beyond that which existed on December 1, 1984. Alternative access shall include access through the internal street system or using frontage roads or service drives or other appropriate internal access. Any new development or redevelopment of parcels currently having direct access shall include provision of service drives.  Any development of parcels lying between such parcels and ultimate access points shall provide for service drives or other alternative access. It is the intent of this Activity Center Plan that medians be constructed along 39th Avenue at least between 98th Street and 83rd Street and that the number of points at which median cuts are permitted be strictly limited, with consideration of projected traffic volumes and land uses within the Activity Center.

(3)         Direct access may be permitted to 98th Street, but shall be limited to one access point every 400 feet. Where necessary, individual parcels shall share access with adjoining parcels.

(4)         The frontage road located in the northeast quadrant should be closed and relocated using an internal road. As an alternative, this frontage road might be extended as a service drive with no access to N.W. 39th Avenue west of the north‑south road on the east side of the Huntley Jiffy store.  Existing residences and business in the northeast quadrant shall be allowed to utilize this frontage road until other road access is provided by federal and/or  state or private development interest road improvements.  The east/west roadway running between the frontage road and Northwest 91st Street and the north/south roadway running between Northwest 92nd Court and this east/west roadway are subject to relocation based upon field survey and development approval.

(5)         The state and County shall carefully monitor traffic levels as development occurs. In cases where new development may create safety or capacity problems, additional development shall be prohibited until improvements are made to mitigate the impacts. 

(6)         Access points to the two shopping centers and the medical center shall be designed to accommodate bus movements. The design of these facilities shall include accommodations for bus loading/ unloading.

(7)         New construction on collectors or arterials shall include appropriate facilities for pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

(8)         The alignment of the NW 97th Court extension  and the access roads to the Institutional area in the southwest quadrant shown on the Activity Center Plan Map are tentative only; actual alignments shall be determined by the Development Review Committee and redrawn on the Activity Center Map.

(9)         The transportation system within the site shall be developed in an interconnected manner to the maximum extent feasible.  The internal transportation system shall be stubbed out to allow access and interconnections with adjacent properties both within and outside the DRI boundary.  The transportation system shall be designed so that multiple roads, bike-paths and sidewalks can continue into any adjacent development in an effort to integrate adjacent properties and limit the impacts to the arterial roadway system.  The exact number and location of streets, paths and sidewalks to be stubbed out will be determined during the site plan approval process.

(c)         Community Facilities

(1)         All development shall utilize public water and sewer.

(2)         Consideration should be given to this area as a possible location for the development of a County satellite service facility as the location of branch offices for the delivery of County services.

(3)         The County shall consider acquiring the conservation area in the northwest quadrant for a park or open space in accordance with the Recreation Element.

(d)         Implementation

(1)         Use of the PD zoning category for each quadrant with an overall conceptual zoning master plan shall be required for the entire Springhills Development of Regional Impact (DRI) area in order to provide adequate buffer areas, sign and landscaping controls, and to ensure consistency with the intent of the Activity Center Plan.  The Master Plan shall address the overall traffic circulation system, pedestrian and bicycle paths and circulation, mass transit accommodations, stormwater management, open space/recreation areas, conservation areas, and utility provisions, in a manner consistent with the Alachua County Board of County Commissioners adopted Design Standards for the DRI.

(e)         The requirements of this paragraph supersede paragraphs (a) through (d) above  for development within the area designated “Mixed Use” in the northeast, northwest and southeast quadrants of the Activity Center consisting of tax parcels 06038-004-000, 06038-000-000, 06038-003-000, 06038-003-001, 06038-002-000, 06038-001-000, 06038-023-000, 06038-022-000, 06038-022-003, 06233-010-011, 06233-001-000, 06233-001-001, 06233-010-004, 06233-010-010.  These parcels shall be developed as Transit Oriented Developments and, where appropriate, Traditional Neighborhood Developments.  Development shall be allowed through Development Plan approval. Development of the site shall adhere to the following standards:

(1)         General Requirements: Traditional Neighborhood Developments shall adhere to Future Land Use Objective 1.6 and its subsequent policies.  Transit Oriented Developments shall adhere to Future Land Use Objective 1.7 and its subsequent policies.  For the purposes of meeting thresholds set out in the TND and TOD requirements, development of the parcels shall be considered as one “development” with separate phases within each quadrant.  There may be more than one Village Center and Transit Supportive Area within the Northeast quadrant.

(2)         Transportation:

a.           All land uses authorized when combined may not exceed an amount determined to generate 5,800 gross pm peak hour trips based on the Institute of Traffic Engineer’s Trip Generation Manual in effect at the time of Preliminary Development Plan approval. 

b.           Park and ride facilities within the northeast and northwest quadrants adjacent to or in close proximity to transit stations. Park and ride facilities shall be designed for shared evening and weekend use by the development. Park and rides shall be designed in accordance with block, street tree and pedestrian facility requirements of Objectives 1.6 and 1.7 and the subsequent policies of this Element and are encouraged to be screened by liner buildings. The Regional Transit System (RTS) shall be a reviewing entity along with the County and FDOT along State roadways.

c.           Prior to approval of any final development plan, the developer shall enter into an agreement with the County assuring:

1.           The developer’s  responsibility for the design and construction of a roadway with dedicated transit lanes connecting NW 83rd Street at the eastern property boundary of the northeast quadrant (tax parcels 06038-000-000 and 06038-023-000) to an appropriate connection point on the western boundary of the same property; and

2.           The developer shall be responsible for providing dedicated transit lanes with bicycle and pedestrian facilities connecting and continuing from the southern end of NW 83rd Street and NW 23rd Avenue to the northern extent of tax parcel  06315-001-000 by way of an overpass across I-75. In the event that the developer is unable to secure authorization from state and federal permitting authorities for said overpass, or rights to use of tax parcels 06315-001-000 and 06318-000-000 for said dedicated lanes, the developer shall be required instead to provide a roadway, dedicated transit lanes with bicycle and pedestrian facilities connecting and continuing from the western end of NW 83rd Street by way of an overpass  across I-75 to parcel 06038-022-003.

3.           The developer’s responsibility for upgrading the intersection at NW 91st St and 39th Avenue and upgrading NW 91st St from NW 39th Ave to the Santa Fe College Campus.

4.           The developer’s responsibility for partial funding of the capital and operating costs for its share of a Bus Rapid Transit route from the parcels covered by this paragraph 5 to the University of Florida shall be assured, in part through establishment of a Community Development District (CDD) or other appropriate funding mechanism. The CDD, or other appropriate funding mechanism, shall be established in conjunction with approval of the first implementing Planned Development if required, or approval of the first Development Plan. A developer’s agreement shall be entered between the County and developer and shall address details of the development phasing schedule and the level of the funding commitments of the CDD, or other appropriate funding mechanism, to the provision of Bus Rapid Transit service from the parcels to the University of Florida. The funding for transit operations shall be assured for fifteen years. The annual contribution shall be indexed for inflation.

5.           The developer’s responsibility for operational and safety improvements to significantly impacted intersections.  These improvements shall include the construction of necessary improvements including turn lanes, turn lane storage, installation or removal of traffic control devices, infrastructure for the coordination of traffic control devices and transit, bicycle and pedestrian facilities.

d.           NW 95th Blvd, the frontage road located in the northeast quadrant of I-75 and NW 39th Avenue, must be provided with access to the internal roadway system in the northeastern quadrant of the development.

(3)         Conservation Land Use: The area designated Conservation Land Use at the north end of tax parcel 06038-023-000 shall be governed by the conservation land use policies of this comprehensive plan.  The area designated Conservation Land Use is significant plant and wildlife habitat, but may not include all significant plant and wildlife habitat on this parcel.  All regulated natural resources, within the properties governed by these policies, whether or not depicted on the Future Land Use Map, shall be subject to the relevant goals, objectives and policies of the Conservation and Open Space Element and implementing land development regulations in Chapter 406 of the Unified Land Development Code.

 

Policy 2.2.2         Millhopper Activity Center

(a)         Land Use Policies

(1)         Areas with commercial zoning should be developed for office and service uses, including type "a" restaurants, but not type "b" restaurants. Higher density residential development is also encouraged within the Activity Center on land which is currently zoned to a commercial category.

(2)         Where property within the Activity Center abuts property outside the Activity Center, special consideration should be given to the design of the development to ensure that it is in harmony with the residential development which would occur on the outside. In addition to buffers, consideration

should be given to building facades, landscaping, and the prohibition of parking areas, building mechanical equipment, storage areas, and dumpsters from areas close to the periphery of the Activity Center.

Policy 2.2.3      Activity Center Plan ‑ Oaks Mall Activity Center

(a)         General

(1)         It is the intent of this Activity Center Plan to promote the area surrounding the interchange of Interstate 75 and State Road 26 as a high‑intensity regional focal point. In so doing, it should be developed as a mixed use center, allowing for the general land use classifications identified on the Future Land Use map. Individual quadrants of the center should include a mix of complementary uses, including retail, employment, services, and, where possible, residential uses so as to reduce overall traffic impact and promote pedestrian activity.

(b)         Land Use

(1)         Future land uses shall be governed by the land use classifications on the Future Land Use Map. Higher density residential uses are encouraged within the Activity Center on land designated for commercial use.

(2)         Development within the 87.15 acres located on the north side of Newberry Rd. just west of and adjacent to Newberry Crossing and east of Fort Clark Blvd. and incorporating parcels 06331-000-000, 06329-000-000 and 06326-001-002 shall be in accordance with Future Land Use Element Section 1.7 (Transit Oriented Development) and all subsequent Transit Oriented Development policies and the following guidelines:

a.           The maximum allowable land uses on the property shall not exceed that which would produce cumulative motor vehicle traffic impacts of 13,700 gross average annual daily trips, or 9,600 net daily motor vehicle trips based on the Institute of Traffic Engineer’s Trip Generation Manual in effect at the time of development plan approval. The mix of uses allowed shall conform to Future Land Use Policy 1.7.5-1.7.5.5.

b.           Building setbacks that may be established in the Unified Land Development Code and otherwise made applicable to this Transit Oriented Development shall not be applicable to encroachments of porches, bay windows, stoops, and balconies with such setbacks.

c.           On-street parking is encouraged throughout the development.  On-street spaces may each be counted against required parking as long as the space is within 300 feet of the supported use.

d.           Surface stormwater management facilities shall be designed to provide physical and visual amenity value to the Activity Center. Such facilities should be designed, where practicable and appropriate to the urban context, to provide useable open space designed to resemble natural areas. Low impact development methods shall be used where feasible and stormwater management facilities should be interspersed throughout the site to minimize the impacts to the flood prone areas located within the limits of the site. The applicant and County shall determine the feasibility and advisability of working with FDOT to incorporate the existing FDOT stormwater pond at the corner of Newberry Road and Ft. Clarke Boulevard into a common stormwater master plan.

e.           The applicant shall be responsible for the design and construction of a roadway network that connects the existing terminus of NW 76th Blvd. to NW 15th Place. The alignment and design characteristics of the elements of this roadway network shall be determined during the development plan review process and are subject to the approval of Alachua County. The applicant shall also be responsible for intersection turn lanes and a traffic signal at Ft. Clark Blvd and NW 15th if determined during the development plan review process to be warranted for operational and safety reasons. This requirement shall not be interpreted to require improvements needed to maintain the applicable adopted roadway level of service standard.   The location and configuration of the connection to Newberry Road shall be subject to the approval of Alachua County and the Florida Department of Transportation. Access connections to Newberry Road shall not align with existing access connections on the south side of Newberry Road, except for access points that restrict left turn movements into and out of the development.

f.            Parks, squares or plazas shall be provided and shown on the Development Plan and such areas may be considered for inclusion in the calculation for determining compliance with the 20% open space requirement of this Comprehensive Plan.

g.           Development of these parcels shall provide:

1.           Public transit with 15-minute peak hour frequencies and 25-minute frequencies during the non-peak hours; and

2.           Public transit connecting Santa Fe Community College and the Oaks Mall (required transit route); and

3.           Public transit that is coordinated with the Gainesville Regional Transit System (RTS) transit hub maintained at the Oaks Mall.

4.           Transit provided in sections a-c above shall be for a period of 15 years.

h.           Funding shall be assured, in part, through establishment of a Community Development District (CDD) or other appropriate funding mechanism on the parcels covered by this Policy.  The CDD, or other appropriate funding mechanism, shall be established in conjunction with the approval of the Development Plan.  

i.            Funding for the phased implementation of the required transit route shall be identified in the Capital Improvements Element of this Comprehensive Plan. A developer’s agreement shall be entered between the County and developer of the site prior to approval of the final Development Plan addressing details of the development phasing schedule and the level of the funding commitments of the CDD, or other appropriate funding mechanism, for the required transit. It is anticipated that the route from Santa Fe Community College and Oaks Mall will be funded from multiple sources and establishment of the required transit route may occur in increments. An initial phase of the required transit route from the parcels covered by this Policy to the Oaks Mall may serve as an interim step toward completion and full funding for the required transit route from Santa Fe Community College to the Oaks Mall. The timing, source and level of funding for each increment of the route shall be established prior to approval of the final Development Plan, developer’s agreement, and revised Capital Improvements Element. The annual contribution shall be indexed for inflation. Approval of the first phase of development shall require provision of the dedicated transit lanes required by paragraph 10 below and transit service between the site and Oaks Mall.

j.            The Developer shall be responsible to ensure that dedicated transit lanes are constructed that connect to the planned transit corridor between Santa Fe College and the Oaks Mall.  The dedicated lanes shall be constructed between Newberry Road and NW 23rd Avenue.  The design and construction of dedicated transit lanes shall be accordance with RTS and County standards.

k.           The applicant shall coordinate with the County and with the Florida Department of Transportation on the construction of intersection turn lanes and traffic signal modifications at the intersections of Newberry Road (SR 26) and Ft. Clark Blvd and Newberry Road (SR 26) and 76th Blvd needed to ensure operational efficiency and safety. A monetary contribution, not to exceed $300,000, shall also be made towards the I-75 Interchange at Newberry Road (SR   26) to construct facilities to accommodate a dedicated transit lane.

(c)         Transportation and Traffic Circulation

(1)         No new entrances shall be permitted on Newberry Road (State Road 26), except as may be required to provide access to a parcel which has no other practical means of access. All development on a given parcel of land which requires access to Newberry Road should be served by a single entrance; no individual business should be served by a separate entrance if a common entrance or an entrance off a side street is available or can be provided.  New access points to Newberry Road may be permitted only when a documented traffic circulations problem can be mitigated or eliminated through relocation of ingress and egress points or enhancements to traffic signalization.

(2)         Entrances should be located in such a manner as to line up with existing intersections, to the maximum extent feasible.

(3)         The improvement of Newberry Road from Tower Road (Southwest 75th Street) to N.W. 60th Street by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) is encouraged, including the proper timing of traffic signals to maximize the capacity of the road to accommodate through traffic, and including intersection improvements at Tower Road, Northwest 62nd Boulevard, and Northwest 69th Terrace.

(4)         Newberry Road should be widened by FDOT to six (6) lanes within the boundaries of the Activity Center. Improvements to this road should include physical medians to limit left turns to controlled locations. Future redevelopment of parcels fronting on Newberry Road shall provide for service drives and/or internal circulation which controls ingress and egress.

(5)         All necessary transportation improvements, including but not limited to, right‑of‑way acquisition, roadway widening, traffic signalization, intersection improvements, and mass transit facilities that accrue due to the impact of a development shall be provided by the developer and in place prior to the issuance of the certificates of occupancy. This policy may be satisfied by contractual arrangements that establish the timing of improvements and the relative financial responsibilities of all parties. This policy may also be satisfied by an adopted impact fee system affecting, at a minimum, roadway facilities in this area.   

(6)         Tower Road shall be improved between and including the intersection with Newberry Road and Southwest 8th Avenue. These improvements should include additional through‑traffic lanes, left‑turn storage lanes, intersection improvements, bus pull‑outs, bicycle lanes, and traffic signalization.

(7)         Access points to Tower Road shall be permitted only at locations that maximize site distances and promote safe and orderly traffic flow.

Policy 2.2.4      Tower Road/24th Avenue Low Activity Center

(a)         This Activity Center Plan designates the southwest, southeast and northeast corner of the intersection of Tower Road and SW 24th Avenue as a Low Activity Center/Employment.  The Activity Center is specified for a mix of institutional, office, commercial, and residential land uses.  For the protection of the Activity Center as a Low Activity Center / Employment, gross commercial square footage shall not exceed that of office/institutional uses.  

(1)         Institutional uses may include only public and private educational facilities (compulsory), day care and nursery schools; cultural facilities such as libraries, museums, performing arts theaters; health care facilities (hospitals, specialized medical centers, clinics, nursing homes, retirement centers); public utilities and other infrastructure facilities; places of worship, cemeteries; community service organizations and membership lodges; government buildings and public facilities (fire protection, law enforcement, administrative offices, postal service).

(2)         Office uses may include only administrative and professional activities in the fields of health care, law, engineering, architecture, accounting, real estate, and other business and professional services as defined by Alachua County Zoning Regulations.

(3)         Residential land uses shall be utilized as transitional uses from institutional and office uses within the activity center to existing residential land uses within the Activity Center or existing or proposed residential land uses adjacent to the Activity Center. 

(4)         Commercial uses shall be allowed on the 4.4-acre parcel located in the northeast quadrant of the SW 75th Street and SW 24th Avenue intersection.  The parcel shall be limited to a maximum 15,000 ft2 stand-alone retail drug store with prescription-only, drive-through window.  The Planned Development zoning district shall be required to ensure that the remaining undeveloped portion of the site will be maintained as open space and that buffering will be maximized to ensure compatibility with surrounding uses.

Policy 2.2.5      Archer Road/Tower Road Activity Center Plan

(a)         General

(1)         It is the intent of this Activity Center Plan to promote the area around the intersection of Archer Road (State Road 24) and Tower Road (SW 75th Street) as a Low-Medium Activity Center/Retail intensity focal point.  In so doing, it should be developed as a mixed-use center, allowing the general land use classifications identified on the Activity Center Plan map.

(2)         As a Low/Medium Activity Center, development orders should be issued consistent with the policies and standards of this Low-Medium Activity Center/Retail plan.

(3)         The boundary lines for the four quadrants shall be determined by the intersection of Archer Road and the "New" Tower Road alignment.  Land use boundaries are conceptual in nature and may be adjusted as necessary during the development plan review process; however, the relative acreage shall remain the same.

Policy 2.2.6      North Main Street/53rd Avenue Low-Industrial Activity Center

(a)         General

(1)         The Activity Center provides for principal land use of industrial with possible secondary supporting uses of commercial, office or institutional.

(2)         The internal boundaries shown for different land uses on the Future Land Use Map are intended to be conceptual in nature and final boundaries shall be determined at site plan approval.  No land use shall be developed within the rights-of-way of the North Main Street extension.

(b)         Land Use

(1)         Industrial land uses may include all uses permitted in Alachua County industrial zoning categories appropriate with the environmental limitations of the area, such as warehousing, transportation and distribution, manufacturing and fabrication.

(2)         Conservation areas shall be set aside of the approximate size, shape and location shown on the Future Land Use Map to protect selected cypress wetlands.  The actual boundaries of the conservation areas shall be determined by field survey with the Alachua County Department of Environmental Protection at site plan approval.

(c)         Environment

(1)         All facilities within the Activity Center shall comply with hazardous materials management and Murphree Well Field Management Ordinances in effect at the time of site plan approval.  As such, below-ground storage of hazardous materials shall be prohibited (except for storage of automobile fuels).  Above-ground storage of hazardous materials shall be permitted only in those instances where secondary containment and hazardous materials management plans are provided.

(2)         Establishment of base flood elevations in conformance with the Federal Emergency Management (FEMA) standards shall be required.  In addition, the criteria of the County's Flood Prone Area Ordinance shall be met where applicable.

Policy 2.2.7      Jonesville Low Activity Center/Employment

(a)         General

(1)         It is the intent of this Activity Center plan to promote the area around the intersection of Newberry Road (State Road 26) and State Road 241 as a low intensity employment oriented focal point.  In so doing, it should be developed as a mixed use center (i.e., commercial, open space, office/business park, institutional, and residential), allowing for the general land use classifications identified on the Future Land Use Map.

(2)         Land use boundaries are conceptual in nature and may be adjusted as necessary during the zoning and site plan review process; however, relative acreages shall remain the same.

(b)         Land Use

(1)         Commercial activities shall be permitted, including a shopping center where commercial land use is designated on the Activity Center map, subject to Section 2.2.9.2.d.  and phasing requirements.

(2)         All proposed development is required to be served by central water and sewer.

(3)         The office/business park designation may include such uses as administrative and professional offices (including medical clinics but excluding hospitals); corporate headquarters, including related supporting services and storage; sales and marketing offices; sales and service offices related to electronic equipment, computers and similar office equipment, including repair incidental to sales and service; data and communication centers including information processing facilities; research and development facilities; hotels and meeting facilities; government and community administrative facilities; light assembly of products from previously manufactured materials (for example jewelry, fabricated metal products, furniture, plastic and wood); industrial engineering and analysis facilities; business services such as office supplies, copy/print centers, medical supplies, pharmacies and travel agencies; lending institutions; day care centers; technical colleges, business schools and job training centers; free-standing sit down restaurants, without drive through and having seating capacity greater than 150 seats; health clubs/recreation facilities; and their customary accessory uses.  These uses shall be consistent with the policies set forth in this Activity Center, as well as any County land development regulations.

a.           Uses within an office/business park shall not generate noise, lighting, or any other effect that would be a nuisance to surrounding residential development.

(4)         The following minimum external buffers shall be required, as defined by the Buffer Matrix of the Future Land Use Element:

a.           All commercial development within the Activity Center abutting office, office/business park, or institutional shall establish and maintain a low-density buffer of at least 30 feet of width.

b.           All office/business park development abutting office development shall establish and maintain a low density buffer of at least 25 feet in width.

c.           All office/business park, office, or institutional designations abutting residential development shall establish and maintain a medium density buffer of at least 50 feet in width unless otherwise specified in a Planned Development.

d.           All residential uses of 4-8 dwelling units per acre abutting residential development of 1-4 dwelling units per acre shall establish and maintain a low density buffer of at least 30 feet in width.

Policy 2.2.8      Eastside Activity Center Master Plan

(a)         General

The area north of SR 20 (Hawthorne Road) generally located at the intersection of SE 43rd Street and SR 20 and extending to the north approximately ½ mile, east ½ mile, and west ¼ mile is the, Eastside Activity Center.  The Eastside Activity Center Master Plan provides for a mix of residential, office, neighborhood-oriented retail, support service commercial, institutional, and public civic uses.  The Eastside Activity Center Master Plan shall guide the design of development plans within the Activity Center.

(b)         Definitions

(1)         “Business Incubator” is a facility that assists in the development of new business by providing support services such as commercial space, financial assistance, management training, and shared services.  Incubators may house multiple tenants.

(2)                “Gross Floor Area” is the sum of the gross horizontal areas of several floors of a building measured from the exterior faces of the exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating two buildings.

(3)                “Micro Enterprise” is a small business requiring fewer than five full time employees

(4)         “Mixed Use Building” means a building with one floor containing allowed non-residential uses and at least one floor containing allowed residential uses.

(c)         Land Use Categories

The following Future Land Use categories shall apply within the Eastside Activity Center, as shown on the Future Land Use Map.

(1)         Mixed Use

The intent of the Mixed Use category is that these areas develop with a mix of residential and non-residential uses.  The Mixed Use category supports mixed-use development with active ground-floor uses and available access to public transit, providing a compatible mix of shopping, housing, employment, and community civic uses which will serve as a focal point for the Eastside Activity Center.

a.           Allowable Uses

1.           The Mixed Use area is intended to contain a balanced mixture of compatible retail, office, residential, institutional, and professional services.

2.           Retail uses may include those uses typically found within a Neighborhood Commercial Center as provided in the Commercial policies of the Future Land Use Element.

3.           Office uses may include general business and professional offices, business and professional services, and offices for technology-based firms.

4.           Residential uses may include a mixture of housing types and lots sizes including:  standard or small lot single-family attached or detached dwellings, and multiple-family dwellings.

5.           Institutional uses may include public and private educational facilities; business incubators; job training centers; cultural facilities such as museums or performing arts centers; public civic uses (as provided in Policy 2.2.10(g); libraries; and health care facilities such as hospitals, medical centers, clinics, nursing homes, and retirement centers.

b.           Residential Density

1.           Residential density shall be within the range of 4 to 14 units per acre.

2.           Residential uses may be permitted in addition to non-residential development.

c.           Development Standards

1.           Individual development plan applications within the Mixed Use category may contain both residential and non-residential uses.  Mixed-use development may occur in a vertical form, (e.g. housing above nonresidential), or in a horizontal form (e.g. housing adjacent to nonresidential). Horizontal mixed use development plans shall provide for functional integration of the residential and nonresidential components of the development through street and parking design, building orientation, and pedestrian and bicycle connections.

2.           Transitional design elements must be utilized to provide a step-down in density, intensity, and building height and bulk in areas abutting existing residential uses.  Required open space should be located to provide a transition between new development and existing residential uses.

3.           Retail uses shall be concentrated near Hawthorne Road.

4.           Enhanced buffering may be required between Mixed Use areas and  existing residential uses at the development plan review stage.

(2)         Mixed Use Residential

Mixed Use Residential includes three sub-categories based on allowable densities, as identified on the Future Land Use Map: 4 to 14 units per acre, 4 to 8 units per acre, and 1 to 4 units per acre.  The Mixed Use Residential categories are intended for residential uses of all types, with an optional mix of retail, professional and personal services, and office uses within mixed use buildings.

a.           Allowable Uses

1.           Residential uses, including standard or small lot single-family attached or detached dwellings and multiple-family dwellings.

2.           Office uses, designed at a scale to be compatible with and serve the immediate neighborhood, are permitted on the ground floor within mixed use buildings in all Mixed Use Residential categories.

3.           Retail uses and professional and personal services are permitted on the ground floor within mixed use buildings in the Mixed Use Residential (4 to 14 units per acre) category.

4.           Public Civic Uses (as provided in Policy 2.2.10(g)) shall be allowable in all Mixed Use Residential categories.

b.           Residential Density

The following residential densities shall apply within the Mixed Use Residential designations, as shown on the Future Land Use Map:

1.           4 to 14 units per acre

2.           4 to 8 units per acre

3.           1 to 4 units per acre

c.           Non-Residential Development Intensity

1.           Non-residential uses, including office, retail, and professional or personal services are allowable only within mixed use buildings.  Stand-alone non-residential uses are not permitted in the Mixed Use Residential categories.

2.           Non residential uses within mixed use buildings are limited to a maximum of 50 percent of the usable floor area of the building.

d.           Development Standards

1.           Transitional design elements must be utilized to provide a step-down in density, intensity, and building height and bulk in areas abutting existing residential uses.

2.           Transitions between new development and existing residential uses should include provision of open space.

(3)         Mixed Use – Neighborhood Convenience Center

The Mixed Use - Neighborhood Convenience Center area is intended for small-scale retail, office, and professional or personal services.  Such uses may include small-scale shopping, dining, office and services oriented toward the immediate neighborhood.

a.           Allowable Uses

Allowable uses include restaurants/cafes, coffee shops, book stores, dry cleaning, personal care, specialty retail shops, art galleries, professional and business offices, professional services, day care centers, public civic uses (as provided in Policy 2.2.10(g)), and limited residential uses.  Drive-thru facilities are not permitted in this area.

b.           Development Standards

1.           The Mixed Use-Neighborhood Convenience Center area shall be        designed to accommodate pedestrian and bicycle connectivity        from all surrounding residential areas and from Eastside High            School.

(4)         Mixed Use Employment

The Mixed Use Employment areas are intended to accommodate non-retail, employment-generating land uses, with an option for retail, professional services, or residential uses which are accessory to and serve the immediate employment areas.

a.           Allowable Uses

Allowable uses include professional offices; business and professional services; offices for technology-based firms and micro enterprises; research and development activities; catering operations; public and private educational facilities; business incubators; job training centers; public civic uses including libraries or recreational facilities; health care facilities including medical centers, clinics, nursing homes, and assisted living facilities; residential uses within mixed use buildings; and retail uses designed to serve the businesses, employees, and residents of the immediate area.

b.           Residential Density

1.           Residential dwellings are allowable at a maximum density of 2 dwelling units per acre in conjunction with non-residential uses

c.           Development Standards

1.           Transitional design elements, such as step-down in density, intensity, building height and bulk, and other protection measures in accordance with the Conservation and Open Space Element, will be utilized to protect Conservation areas and significant habitat within or adjacent to the Activity Center.

2.           Required open space should be located within development to serve as a buffer to adjacent wetlands, high quality uplands and Strategic Ecosystem areas within or adjacent to the Activity Center.

(5)         Institutional

a.           The areas designated Institutional recognize existing institutional uses within the Eastside Activity Center, including Eastside High School and the Alachua County Fire Station.  This designation may also be applied to future Institutional uses within the Activity Center.

b.           Pursuant to Sections 1013.33(15), Florida Statutes, Eastside High School is consistent with the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan.

c.                         Expansion of the existing Eastside High School site shall be coordinated with Alachua County pursuant to Section 1013.33(15) to ensure that the expansion occurs in a manner that is integrated with the overall Activity Center Master Plan and is adequate with respect to environmental concerns, health, safety and welfare, and effects on adjacent property as provided in Section 1013.33(13), Florida Statutes.

(d)         Transportation and Traffic Circulation

(1)         The Master Plan Community Facilities Map identifies generalized future transportation corridors within the Eastside Activity Center.  These corridors are identified as general locations for the internal traffic circulation system to serve development within the Activity Center.  The corridor and multimodal facility locations shown on the map are generalized only, with the specific locations of future roadway alignments and multimodal facilities to be determined at the development plan review stage, taking into account land use and environmental conditions.  New roads that are needed as part of the internal circulation system to serve development in the Activity Center shall be the responsibility of the developers of property within the Activity Center. 

a.           Transportation corridors identified on the Community Facilities Map shall contain design elements including, on-street parking, sidewalks, bicycle lanes, pedestrian-scale lighting, bulb-outs with landscaping, gutters, shade trees, and shelters at bus stops.

(2)         Arrangements for all necessary transportation improvements (including, but not limited to, roadway construction, right‑of‑way acquisition, roadway widening, traffic signalization, intersection improvements, pedestrian and bicycle facilities, and mass transit facilities) shall be made as conditions of development plan approval.

(3)         Ingress/egress to property within the Activity Center shall be provided via SE 43rd Street or other local roads that may be constructed to provide access to the activity center to the maximum extent possible. Primary access via SR 20 (Hawthorne Road) shall be minimized in order to maintain and preserve traffic mobility on the roadway, which is part of the Florida Intrastate Highway System and Strategic Intermodal System.

(4)         All transportation improvements in the Activity Center shall be evaluated to ensure that safe transportation of children to the public schools is accomplished.

(5)         New roadway facilities within the Activity Center shall be designed to connect to existing roads and rights-of-way in the surrounding area to the greatest extent possible, except where such connectivity is precluded by constraints resulting from the location of existing development or environmental features. 

(6)         Development plan applications must include an assessment of the need for transportation improvements to SE 43rd Street resulting from the proposed development.  These improvements may include, but are not limited to: intersection improvements to SE 43rd Street at Hawthorne Road and East University Avenue; turn lanes and bicycle and pedestrian facility improvements on SE 43rd Street; and pedestrian safety improvements, including traffic calming measures on SE 43rd Street at its intersection with Hawthorne Road and in the area of Eastside High School.  Conditions may be included on development plans to address necessary improvements to level of service and operational or safety conditions.

(7)         Development plan applications on properties within the Eastside Activity Center shall be coordinated with Gainesville Regional Transit System (RTS) to evaluate the potential need for intermodal transit facilities associated with the City’s Bus Rapid Transit Study.  If, at the time of development, the Bus Rapid Transit Study or other documentation from RTS indicates that there are needs for intermodal transit facilities in the Activity Center as part of an overall Bus Rapid Transit System, then development plans shall incorporate areas for such facilities, which shall be accessible by pedestrians from all areas of the development.  Any land areas acquired, or otherwise transferred, for transit facilities may be included in the acreage used for determining allowable gross residential density or non-residential floor area within a development.

(e)         Natural Resource Protection

(1)         The use of special materials and/or engineering design techniques to reduce the volume and improve the treatment of storm water runoff are encouraged, including the use of Low Impact Design techniques.  These techniques include, but are not limited to the following:

a.           Clustering of development on non-environmentally-sensitive portions of a development parcel;

b.           Use of bioretention areas or ‘rain gardens’;

c.           Use of permeable pavements;

d.           Redirecting rooftop runoff to functional landscape areas, rain barrels or cisterns;

e.           Minimization of impervious surfaces through use of shared driveways and parking lots;

f.            Minimization of rooftop area by building vertically instead of horizontally, in order to reduce the total footprint area of buildings;

g.           Reduction in impervious driveways through minimized building setbacks;

h.           Use of “Florida Friendly” plant species and preferably native species for landscaping; and

i.            Enhanced stormwater treatment areas, similar to the requirements as provided in Chapter 407.56 ULDC.

(2)         Undeveloped areas within individual developments that are set aside for the protection of the Eastside Greenway Strategic Ecosystem, in accordance with Policy 4.10.5 of the Conservation and Open Space Element, shall be geographically and functionally connected to form a continuous corridor through the Eastside Activity Center.  The primary function of the corridor shall be to preserve the ecological integrity of the Eastside Greenway Strategic Ecosystem, including providing a wildlife corridor.  The corridor may also serve as a location for recreational trails.

a.           The corridor width and location shown on the Community Facilities Map is generalized.  The actual width and location may vary depending on the location and quality of the natural resources on a particular property, as determined through ground-truthing.

b.           The preferred width of the corridor shall be an average of 300 feet.  It may be less than 300 feet in some areas, provided that the ecological integrity of the Eastside Greenway Strategic Ecosystem is protected.

c.           Land areas set aside for the corridor may be included in the acreage used for determining allowable gross residential density or non-residential floor area within a development.  The allowable density or non-residential floor area may be clustered in non-conservation portions of the development.

(f)          Urban Design

(1)         Site and building design shall be consistent with the general standards for Urban Activity Centers provided in Policies 2.1.4 through 2.1.12 of the Future Land Use Element.

(2)         Both vertical and horizontal mixing of uses is encouraged.            

(3)         Development in the Activity Center shall be in the form of streets and blocks.

(4)         Provision shall be made for public use areas, streets, and squares that are safe, comfortable, and attractive for the pedestrian, with adjoining buildings open to the street, and with parking not interfering with pedestrian, transit, automobile and truck travel modes.

(5)         The Activity Center shall contain a continuous interconnected network of narrow streets, including a pedestrian and bicycle circulation system which is designed to calm automobile traffic speeds, provide a variety of itineraries, encourage walking and bicycling throughout the activity center, provide connectivity, and functionally and physically integrate the various uses within and surrounding the Activity Center.

(6)         Where appropriate, development or redevelopment shall be accessible to and accommodate public transit routes that serve the Eastside Activity Center, and shall provide comfortable, multi-functional space for transit riders waiting for buses, including covered transit stops or bus shelters, which are appropriately scaled in size and number to the proposed development.  Bicycle storage shall be required with particular emphasis on the need for park and ride bicycle storage for transit riders.

(7)         Parking and loading functions shall be located and designed to respect, and reinforce, the pedestrian orientation of the Activity Center through the provision of on-street parking on narrow streets and placement of parking and loading areas behind or on the side of buildings.  Building frontages should spatially delineate public streets and mask the majority of the parking.

(8)         Reduction of required off-street parking areas shall be considered in order to enhance the pedestrian character of the Activity Center.  Large expanses of off-street parking fronting SE 43rd Street are discouraged.  Parking structures are permitted within all development. 

(9)         On-street parking is encouraged throughout the Activity Center. 

(10)      Primary entrances to buildings shall open to the street.  A series of smaller, well defined customer entrances shall be used to break up long building facades.

(11)      Sidewalks, signage, street trees, landscaping, street furniture, entryway features, and lighting shall enhance the pedestrian character of the Activity Center.

(12)      Special consideration should be given during development review to reducing lighting glare from the Activity Center to adjacent designated residential and natural areas.  In addition, development review should give consideration to noise and visual impacts of air conditioning units, dumpsters, and truck loading areas, and should require that location of these facilities minimize impact on existing and future residential areas.

(g)         Public Civic Uses

(1)         Public Civic Uses, as used in this Activity Center Plan, shall include community-oriented functions including educational, cultural, social, active recreation, community centers, and libraries.  Public Civic Uses shall be allowable in all Future Land Use categories within the Eastside Activity Center, provided that the public civic uses are open to the general public.

(2)         As an incentive to include public civic uses into the Eastside Activity Center, developments which provide public civic uses shall be allowed a total of 1 additional dwelling unit per 500 square feet of indoor public civic use provided in a development plan.  In order to be eligible for this dwelling unit bonus, the public civic uses must be open to the general public.

(3)         For outdoor public civic uses, 1 additional dwelling unit shall be allowed per 5,000 square feet of outdoor public civic use provided in a development plan.  In order to be eligible for this dwelling unit bonus, the public civic uses must be open to the general public.

(h)         Intergovernmental and Community Partnerships

(1)         Development of the Activity Center shall employ mechanisms and resources to unite County and City agencies and local residents to promote economic development in and around the Activity Center and to ensure development occurs in a manner harmonious with institutional, office, residential and commercial uses, Lake Forrest Elementary and Eastside High School.

(2)         Public investments in the form of capital improvements to infrastructure and the location of governmental administration, public safety and various public and non-profit community support activities, should be considered for inclusion in the Capital Improvements Elements of the relevant entities.  Proposed capital improvements shall be coordinated with the School Board of Alachua County to ensure infrastructure improvements in the Activity Center are accomplished while maintaining the safety of children attending public schools in the vicinity.

a.           Road enhancements and extensions of roads in and around the Activity Center should be considered for inclusion in the Capital Improvements Program.

b.           The location of community support services and job related activities such as recreation, social service, and vocational training centers, etc., in this activity center should be pursued through various means including identification of appropriate funding for inclusion in the Capital Improvements Program, and coordination with other relevant public and nonprofit entities such as Santa Fe Community College and the University of Florida to encourage investments by those organizations in  this Center.

c.           The County shall coordinate with Gainesville Regional Utilities concerning extensions and enhancements to existing potable water and sanitary sewer facilities near and within the Activity Center in order to serve development which is consistent with the Eastside Activity Center Master Plan.  Such coordination may include identification of potential funding sources for utility extensions, and programming of funds in Gainesville Regional Utilities’ and/or the County's Capital Improvements Programs.

(3)         Focus activities to strengthen private investment in the Activity Center, including:

a.           Encourage the linkage of job training to job creation within the Activity Center.

b.           Encourage the creation of a business incubator within the Activity Center.

c.           Encourage the coordination of community policing and neighborhood servicing efforts.

3.0 COMMERCIAL POLICIES

OBJECTIVE 3.1 - GENERAL

A variety of commercial land use categories shall be established to allow for a range of commercial activities within designated areas, distributed to make efficient use of infrastructure and land, and to meet market demand.  Commercial development shall include such uses as retail sales, professional services, business services, and personal services and storage (mini-warehouses).

Policy 3.1.1      In order to provide sufficient flexibility to meet the needs of different types of commercial activities, a range of land areas and locations shall be provided for commercial development.

Policy 3.1.2      New commercial facilities shall be encouraged to locate within designated activity centers, Transit Oriented Developments or Traditional Neighborhood Developments in order to discourage strip commercial development and the premature establishment of new activity centers.

(a)      All neighborhood level commercial shall locate within high or low activity centers, or within Transit Oriented Developments or Traditional Neighborhood Developments, consistent with the standards of this Element.

(b)      All community level commercial shall locate within high activity centers, or within Transit Oriented Developments or Traditional Neighborhood Developments, consistent with the standards of this Element.

(c)         All regional level commercial shall locate within high activity centers, or within Transit Oriented Developments consistent with the standards of this Element.

Policy 3.1.3      The size, location, and function of commercial uses shall be related and central to the population and market area they serve.

Policy 3.1.4      In conformance with the Economic Element, the land development regulations shall provide for home-based businesses. Home-based businesses are defined as a business or commercial activity conducted on a residential property which is accessory to the residential use of that property. Home-based businesses shall not adversely impact adjacent residential uses, subject to performance criteria to be adopted in the land development regulations.

Policy 3.1.5      The sale of agricultural products produced on site shall be permissible on that site.

Policy 3.1.6      Commercial uses shall be allowed as part of a mixed use Transit Oriented Development or Traditional Neighborhood Development, subject to location, site, and design standards in the Urban Residential policies of this Element.

Policy 3.1.7      Commercial locations and proposed uses shall be consistent with the Conservation and Open Space Element Policies and Standards.

 

OBJECTIVE 3.2 - LOCATION AND COMPATIBILITY

Commercial development shall be located and designed to maintain compatibility with neighboring residential uses and support pedestrian activity, taking into account scale and intensity, through implementation of the following policies.

Policy 3.2.1      Commercial development shall be designed to eliminate or minimize the negative impacts on surrounding residential uses.

Policy 3.2.2      Commercial development shall provide adequate buffering or transitional development and design practices, to adequately integrate the development along the edges of different land uses.

Policy 3.2.3      Commercial landscaping and signage shall comply with standards for commercial development in the land development regulations. 

Policy 3.2.4      All Neighborhood, Community, and Regional commercial centers shall include pedestrian access, bicycle parking areas, and bus bays and bus shelters in order to encourage alternative transportation modes.

OBJECTIVE 3.3 - REQUIRED FACILITIES AND SERVICES

New commercial development or redevelopment shall have adequate public facilities and services at the time development occurs.

OBJECTIVE 3.3

Policy 3.3.1      New commercial development shall meet all of the requirements for adequate facilities based on the level of service standards adopted in this plan for roads, potable water and sanitary sewer, solid waste, and stormwater facilities and the concurrency provisions of this Plan.

Policy 3.3.2      In addition to the facilities for which level of service standards are adopted as part of the concurrency management system of this plan, other facilities that shall be adequate to serve new commercial development include:

(a)         fire, police, and emergency medical protection;

(b)         local streets;

(c)         pedestrian facilities and bikeways.

OBJECTIVE 3.4 - ROADWAY COMMERCIAL POLICIES AND STANDARDS

Roadway commercial areas are located where existing commercial developments are found, and provide for limited in-fill between such uses.  Roadway commercial or "strip commercial" developments are generally undesirable because of increased traffic problems and decreased visual.

Policy 3.4.1      New development in existing Roadway Commercial areas shall be subject to the following location and compatibility standards: 

(a)         New Roadway Commercial developments shall only be permitted as infill of existing "strips" rather than extending or opening up new "strips".

(b)         Roadway commercial uses shall meet the criteria in Policy 3.4.4(b) concerning access management.

(c)         Roadway commercial uses are appropriate only within the designated urban clusters.

(d)         Office uses may be permitted to infill existing strip commercial areas when appropriate office standards are met (see 3.9.1.).

Policy 3.4.2      Roadway Commercial uses shall be implemented with development regulations which address the unique needs of this land use classification.  In the interim, until land development regulations consistent with these policies are adopted, the standards and criteria governing Roadway Commercial development shall be implemented through Planned Development zoning.

Policy 3.4.3      New roadway commercial areas shall be prohibited.

Policy 3.4.4      Commercial Enclaves are designated within the Urban Cluster on the Future Land Use Map.  These sites shall be subject to the following standards:

(a)         Development of Commercial Enclaves shall be required to meet all concurrency requirements.

(b)         Development shall be required to minimize access from arterials and collectors.  Whenever possible, driveways shall use common access points to reduce potential turn movements.

(c)         A maximum of 20,000 square feet of gross leasable area shall be permitted within each enclave.

(d)         Uses may include neighborhood convenience centers consistent with Objective 3.8., offices consistent with Policy 3.9.1., and sit down restaurants.

(e)         The land development regulations for this land use category shall specify performance standards required to mitigate any adverse impact of such development on adjacent land uses and affected public facilities.  Such performance standards shall include buffering and landscaping provisions, site design measures to locate such uses away from less intensive adjacent land uses, signage and parking restrictions, and intensity provisions (e.g. height and bulk restrictions).  In the interim, until land development regulations consistent with these policies are adopted, the standards and criteria governing Commercial Enclaves shall be implemented through the County's Development Review Committee process.

(f)          New Commercial Enclaves shall be prohibited.

OBJECTIVE 3.5 - REGIONAL COMMERCIAL CENTER POLICIES AND STANDARDS

Regional Commercial Centers are described by the following standards and general characteristics:

 

Usual Minimum Site Area

 

30‑50 acres or more

 

Gross Leasable Area (GLA)

 

300,000‑1,000,000 sq. ft. or more

 

Minimum Support Required

 

150,000 or more people

 

Market Area Radius

 

10‑15 miles or more

 

Number of Stores

 

40 or more

 

Leading Tenant

 

1 or more full‑line department stores of at least 100,000 sq. ft. GLA

 

Other Tenants

 

Stores providing such items as: General merchandise, furniture, and home furnishings.

 

Policy 3.5.1      Regional Commercial Centers shall only be located in areas designated for commercial development in High Activity Centers consistent with the following policies, or within Transit Oriented Developments.

(a)         Regional Commercial Centers shall be located at the:

(1)         intersection of arterials, or

(2)         interchanges of arterials and interstate highways.

(b)     Regional Commercial Centers and any planned expansion shall be developed with an overall plan to address access management issues.

(c)         Regional Commercial Centers shall be served by mass transportation routes and shall be designed to accommodate mass transit, bicycles, and pedestrians.

(d)    Regional Commercial Centers shall only locate where automobile, bicycle, and pedestrian access is adequate to accommodate safe and convenient access to the shopping center.

 

OBJECTIVE 3.6 - COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL CENTER POLICIES AND STANDARDS

Community Commercial Centers are described by the following standards and characteristics:

 

Usual Minimum Site Area

 

10 acres

 

Gross Leasable Area (GLA)

 

100,000 to 300,000 sq. ft.

 

Minimum Support Required

 

20,000 to 60,000 people

 

Market Area Radius

 

2 miles or more

 

Number of Stores

 

15 to 40

 

Leading Tenant

 

Variety, discount, or junior department store

 

Other Tenants

 

A supermarket and drugstore

Policy 3.6.1      Community Commercial Centers shall be only located in areas designated for commercial development in High Activity Centers, or within Transit Oriented Developments at the:

(a)         intersection of arterials, or

(b)         intersection of collectors and arterials.

(c)         Community Commercial Centers shall only locate where automobile, bicycle, and pedestrian access is adequate to accommodate safe and convenient access to the shopping center.

OBJECTIVE 3.7 - NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL CENTER POLICIES AND STANDARDS

Neighborhood Commercial centers are described by the following standards and general characteristics:

Usual Minimum Site Area

4 acres

Gross Leasable Area (GLA)

30,000 to 100,000 sq. feet

Minimum Support Required

5,000 to 10,000 people

Radius of Market Area

1‑1/4 miles or more

Number of Stores

5 to 20

Leading Tenant

Supermarket

Other Tenants

Stores providing convenience goods and personal services for the day‑to‑day needs of the immediate neighborhoods.

Policy 3.7.1      Neighborhood Shopping Centers shall only locate in areas designated for commercial development in Low or High Activity Centers, or within Transit Oriented Developments, where:

(a)       automobile, bicycle, and pedestrian access is adequate to accommodate safe and convenient access to the shopping center

(b)         local neighborhood streets do not provide  principal automobile traffic access.

OBJECTIVE 3.8 - NEIGHBORHOOD CONVENIENCE COMMERCIAL POLICIES AND STANDARDS

Neighborhood Convenience Centers are represented by the following standards and characteristics: 

 

Usual Maximum Site Area

 

4 Acres

 

Gross Leasable Area (GLA)

 

3,000 to 30,000 square feet

 

Spacing

At least 1 mile travelling distance on public roads from the property boundary of facilities supplying the same needs or another Neighborhood Convenience Center.

 

Leading Tenant

 

convenience store, drug store, grocery store

 

Other Tenants

 

laundry, dry cleaning, eating places, day care center.

 

Transitional Land Uses (at the edge of the Neighborhood Convenience center, to be included in the four acre site

 

civic, open space, office, residential, business, industrial.

Policy 3.8.1      Neighborhood Convenience Centers shall only be located in areas designated and mapped for commercial development, Low or High, Activity Centers, rural employment centers, or rural clusters, consistent with the following policies:

(a)         on major collector or arterial streets, with preference given to locations at the intersections of such streets.

(b)       New Convenience Centers shall not be located internally within existing single family neighborhoods unless integrated with the surrounding neighborhood through a neighborhood planning process and approved through a comprehensive plan amendment.

(c)         The County shall promote the development of commercial uses in planned commercial centers and discourage scattered, incremental and strip commercial development.

(d)        Neighborhood Convenience land uses are allowable within Transit Oriented Developments and Traditional Neighborhood Developments consistent with the policies under Objectives 1.6 and 1.7 of this Element.

OBJECTIVE 3.9 - OFFICE POLICIES AND STANDARDS

An Office land use category shall be established for individual offices or office parks to provide for professional and business services, business incubators, research and development activities and uses similar to those allowed in Policy 4.3.1.  Office uses are suited to mixed use developments because of the need to have accessibility to both residential and other commercial uses. Their special trade area characteristics require office uses to have additional policies and standards.

Policy 3.9.1      Office uses shall only be located in areas designated for commercial development, Activity Centers, Traditional Neighborhood Developments, Transit Oriented Developments, rural employment centers, or rural clusters.

(a)         Office uses shall be grouped within compact areas, including vertically mixed uses, to discourage disruption to residential areas.

(1)         Office uses should not be located between properties designated for development at low or medium density on the Future Land Use Map, except when designed as part of a Transit Oriented Development or Traditional Neighborhood Development.

(2)         The land development regulations shall specify appropriate buffers or transitional development and design practices, when office uses are permitted adjacent to residential development or other uses.

(b)         Office uses are appropriate in areas planned for high density residential use along major arterials served by public mass transportation, including Activity Centers, Traditional Neighborhood Developments and Transit Oriented Developments.

OBJECTIVE 3.10 - TOURIST/ENTERTAINMENT COMMERCIAL POLICIES AND STANDARDS

Tourist/entertainment commercial uses are oriented primarily toward providing services for the short term visitor to Alachua County.  These commonly include gasoline stations, restaurants, lodging, bed and breakfast, and special entertainment facilities.

Policy 3.10.1   Tourist/entertainment uses shall be located consistent with the following policies:

(a)         These uses are most appropriate, but are not limited to, highway interchanges with Interstate 75.

(b)      Tourist/entertainment uses should have direct access from arterials with preference given to intersections. In specific instances it may be appropriate for certain uses to locate away from arterials due to the desire to locate that individual use adjacent to the natural environment or a cultural resource.  (e.g., near lakes, marine business uses and campgrounds might be appropriate, or in a rural cluster, where a bed and breakfast establishment might be appropriate.) 

Policy 3.10.2   Development regulations to implement the Tourist/Entertainment commercial uses shall be adopted.  These shall include specific standards to govern the design and intensity of the tourist/entertainment uses that may be located adjacent to the natural or cultural resources consistent with the protection of those resources and the Conservation and Open Space Element of this plan.

OBJECTIVE 3.11  - RURAL COMMERCIAL USES

Policy 3.11.1   Rural Commercial-Agriculture uses are shown on the Future Land Use map.  The standards for Rural Commercial-Agriculture uses outside of rural clusters are as follows:

(a)         Development of Rural Commercial-Agriculture uses shall be required to meet all concurrency requirements.

(b)         Development shall be required to minimize access from arterials and collectors.  Whenever possible, driveways shall use common access points to reduce potential turn movements.

(c)         Unless otherwise permitted as a Special Exception by the Board of County Commissioners, a maximum of 10,000 square feet of gross leasable area shall be permitted on each Rural Commercial-Agriculture parcel.

(d)         Uses may include neighborhood convenience centers consistent with Objective 3.8., offices consistent with Policy 3.9.1., sit down restaurants, and agricultural services to serve the rural area.

(e)        The land development regulations for this land use category shall specify performance standards required to mitigate any adverse impact of such development on adjacent land uses and affected public facilities.  Such performance standards shall include buffering and landscaping provisions, site design measures to locate such uses away from less intensive adjacent land uses, signage and parking restrictions, and intensity provisions (e.g. height and bulk restrictions).  In the interim, until land development regulations consistent with these policies are adopted, the standards and criteria governing Rural Commercial-Agriculture development shall be implemented by the County's Development Review Committee process.

(f)          As part of an area-based Community and Neighborhood Planning program to be implemented as a follow up to the Comprehensive Plan update, the Future Land Use Map shall be reevaluated to consider reclassification of areas designated for Rural Commercial-Agriculture uses as Agriculture. (These parcels are undeveloped rural sites with commercial zoning classifications established prior to October 2, 1991.)

 

4.0 INDUSTRIAL POLICIES

OBJECTIVE 4.1 - GENERAL

Industrial land use categories shall be established to allow for a range of light and heavy industrial activities, subject to the policies and standards contained in this Chapter.  Industrial developments are characterized by the fabrication, manufacturing, transporting, warehousing or distribution of goods as well as facilities for research, development, or experimental laboratories.  In addition a fairground shall be authorized on that portion of Tax Parcels 07872-003-002 and 07872-003-008 described in the Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions recorded in Book 3598, Page 1133 of the Official Records of Alachua County; fairground uses include agricultural, community-based or government-oriented activities, and to the extent any of these activities are commercial in nature, said activities shall not exceed a period greater than six (6) consecutive months.

Policy 4.1.1      Industrial development shall be located in the urban cluster, with the following limited exceptions:

(a)         Material-oriented industrial development that is  1) dependent on natural resources found in the rural area, or 2) based on raw agricultural products, materials, or activities at or proximate to the site, may be located only as follows:

(1)         The Board of County Commissioners must first make a determination that the proximity of the particular industrial use to natural resources or raw materials is so significant a factor for that industrial use that:

a.           its location outside of the urban cluster at or near the site of those resources or materials is appropriate, and

b.           its location within the urban cluster is inappropriate.

(2)         The determination shall be based in part on an economic analysis of the particular industrial activity.  The economic analysis shall evaluate, without regard to land cost, economies associated with performing the industrial activity at or near the site of the resources or materials, compared to performing the industrial activity in an industrial area.  The Board of County Commissioners shall also consider the following factors:

a.           the impact on public health and the environment,

b.           compatibility with surrounding land uses,

c.           cost in the provision of public services and infrastructure to the particular material-oriented industrial activity,

d.           effect on the economy of the area, and

e.           consistency with other policies in the Comprehensive Plan.

(3)         If consideration of all the factors in paragraph 2 leads to the conclusion that the industrial activity should be located at a particular site outside the urban cluster , then the site shall be designated on the Future Land Use Map as Industrial/Resource-based or Industrial/Agriculturally-dependent.  The Industrial/Resource-based or Industrial/Agriculturally-dependent land use classification shall be applied as an overlay district, providing for the underlying land use classification to remain in effect as well.

(4)         Any designation of sites with such a rural industrial overlay district shall be accompanied by policies addressing standards for the specific type of industrial use, its scale and intensity, and other conditions related to matters such as environmental issues, compatibility with surrounding uses, infrastructure, and the specific form of subsequent development orders that will be required to proceed with development of the site.  These policies may include requirements for any necessary additional special studies to be carried out by or for the County at the expense of the applicant. 

(5)         The land development regulations shall establish or identify appropriate zoning classifications and other site-specific approval processes for these types of industrial uses.

(b)         Industrial uses, other than those limited uses provided for in Policy 4.1.1(a), located outside of the urban cluster shall locate in existing rural employment centers, and shall be designated on the Future Land Use Map with the appropriate land use classification. Standards for rural employment centers are contained in Section 6.0.

Policy 4.1.2      A range of choice in land areas and locations for the different types of industry shall be provided to meet the anticipated expansion of industry in the County and to meet the objectives of the Economic Element of this Plan.  Sufficient area for industrial land use shall be identified in appropriate locations on the Future Land Use Map in an effort to create a supply of land which has the proper zoning already in place, which is therefore immediately available for such uses.  The County has identified a number of potential locations with suitable infrastructure, including parcels with rail access, interstate access, or proximity to cargo terminals, and suitable environmental characteristics for such uses.

Policy 4.1.3      Industrial locations and proposed uses shall be consistent with the Conservation and Open Space Policies of Alachua County.

Policy 4.1.4      Industrial operations shall meet the performance standards established in the Unified Land Development Code in order to eliminate or, where possible, minimize impacts on public health and the environment.

OBJECTIVE 4.2 -   LOCATION AND COMPATIBILITY

Policy 4.2.1      Industrial uses shall not be located adjacent to residential or agricultural areas without adequate buffering or integrating design and business practices to eliminate or minimize adverse impacts. Land use decisions concerning location of industrial uses shall take into consideration environmental justice.

Policy 4.2.2      Prime industrial locations, pursuant to Policy 4.1.2 above, shall be kept free from encroachment of incompatible land uses.

Policy 4.2.3      Commercial uses within an area designated for industrial land use shall be limited to neighborhood convenience, except as provided in Objective 4.1 for that portion of Tax Parcels 07872-003-002 and 07872-003-008 described in the Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions recorded in Book 3598, Page 1133 of the Official Records of Alachua County.  

OBJECTIVE 4.3 -   LIGHT INDUSTRIAL 

The Light Industrial future land use classification is established to accommodate certain office and light industrial uses, such as research and development and experimental laboratories and similar uses or the manufacturing or fabrication of products that have minimal off-site impacts.  Certain warehousing, transportation and distribution uses may be appropriate if all performance standards can be achieved.

Policy 4.3.1      Certain office and light industrial uses, such as research, development, advanced and computer assisted manufacturing, and experimental laboratories  and similar uses, or the manufacturing or fabrication of products that have minimal off-site impacts and that do not require specialized sites may also be appropriate within Office land uses Transit Oriented Developments (TODs) or Activity Centers.  Performance standards shall be incorporated into the land development regulations to provide buffering, signage, landscaping, and architectural standards, and other methods to limit any adverse impacts and ensure compatibility with adjacent areas.

OBJECTIVE 4.4 -  HEAVY INDUSTRIAL

The Heavy Industrial Future Land Use is established to accommodate traditional industrial uses that are dependent on transportation and large volumes of raw materials. Heavy Industrial uses have unique potential impacts on surrounding lands including noise, odor, smoke, vibration and other hazards. Heavy Industrial uses shall be located to provide the most efficient provision of services while minimizing potential impacts to adjacent development and environmental features.

Policy 4.4.1      Heavy Industrial uses shall not be located adjacent to residential or agricultural areas without adequate buffering or integrating design and business practices to eliminate or minimize adverse impacts. Land use decisions concerning location of industrial uses shall take into consideration environmental justice.

Policy 4.4.2      Prime heavy industrial locations, pursuant to Policy 4.1.2 above, shall be kept free from encroachment of incompatible land uses.

Policy 4.4.3      The use of tires, plastics or plastic derived materials as a fuel source or as feedstock for waste to energy facility is prohibited. Exceptions to this policy may be allowed for research and development activities by special exception when approved by the Board of County Commissioners. Additional standards including limitations on scale and environmental and safety standards shall be included in the Unified Land Development Code for such research and development activities.

OBJECTIVE 4.5 -   DESIGN AND SITE STANDARDS

Policy 4.5.1      Industrial facilities in the urban cluster shall group together in planned industrial districts on sites capable of being expanded and developed in stages. Criteria for permitting industrial development shall include but are not limited to:

(a)         topography and soils‑land having stable, well‑drained soils, free from flooding;

(b)         climate‑‑prevailing wind direction that does not impact adjacent residential areas;

(c)         accessibility‑‑access to arterials and highways and, where possible, rail facilities;

(d)         utilities‑‑availability of water, sewer, electricity or natural gas in adequate quantities;

(e)         size‑‑large enough for proper site design.  

Policy 4.5.2                    Industrial sites shall be designed to provide for:

(a)         adequate off‑street parking to meet the needs of the operation;

(b)         adequate buffering along roadways and adjacent uses to minimize the effects of lighting, noise and signing.

Policy 4.5.3      When development is located along a railway facility or a railroad‑highway intersection, conflicts between the development and the adjacent highway network should be avoided.

OBJECTIVE 4.6  -  REQUIRED FACILITIES AND SERVICES 

Policy 4.6.1      Industrial development shall be located only in areas where adequate facilities and services exist or will be provided prior to occupancy. These facilities include, but are not limited to:

(a)         roadways.

(b)         fire service.

(c)         water supply.

(d)         street lighting.

(e)         solid waste collection and disposal.

(f)          sewage collection and disposal.

(g)         storm water drainage and disposal.

(h)         emergency medical service.

Policy 4.6.2      New industrial development shall meet all of the requirements for adequate facilities based on the level of service standards for those facilities and concurrency provisions of the Plan. 

5.0 INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES

OBJECTIVE 5.1 – GENERAL

An institutional land use category shall be established to provide for a range of activities related to human development and community services, subject to the policies and standards contained in this Section.

Policy 5.1.1      Potential locations for major future institutional uses are identified on the Future Land Use Map.  Institutional uses may be allowed in other land use categories designated on the Future Land Use Map, and implemented in accordance with the guidance and policies within this Section 5.0., and within the Comprehensive Plan as a whole.

Policy 5.1.2      The following uses are considered institutional and governmental uses in Alachua County:

(a)         Public and Private Educational Facilities (meeting State of Florida compulsory education requirements), Day Care Centers, and Nursery Schools. 

(b)         Community Services (e.g. civic and government facilities, fire and emergency services, law enforcement, health facilities, community service organizations, correctional facilities). 

(c)         Public Utility, Communications or Infrastructure Services (e.g. utility transmission and distribution facilities, landfills). 

(d)         Religious Facilities; and 

(e)         Cemeteries.

OBJECTIVE 5.2  - LOCATION AND COMPATIBILITY

Policy 5.2.1      The following criteria shall determine the appropriateness of potential institutional locations and uses requiring special use permits shall be demonstrated prior to establishing the institutional use: 

(a)         Optimum service area. 

(b)         Optimum operating size.

(c)         Access to clientele.

(d)         Compatibility of the scale and intensity of the use in relationship to surrounding uses, taking into account impacts such as, noise, lighting, visual effect, traffic generation, odors.

(e)         Nature of service provision.

(f)          Needs of the clientele.

(g)         Availability and adequacy of public infrastructure to serve the particular use.

(h)         Preservation and strengthening of community and neighborhood character through design.

(i)          Consistency with the goals, objectives, and policies of the Conservation and Open Space Element.

Policy 5.2.2                    Institutional facilities shall be designed and located for integration into the surrounding community.  Land use decisions concerning location of institutional uses shall take into consideration environmental justice.

OBJECTIVE 5.3  -    EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES

Policy 5.3.1      The following areas shall be avoided when locating future educational facilities in Alachua County: 

(a)         Noise Attenuation Area or Noise Sensitive District, and other airport impact areas as prohibited by Chapter 333, Florida Statutes. 

(b)         Environmentally sensitive areas as determined in accordance with the conservation policies of Alachua County (see the Conservation and Open Space Element.)

(c)         Areas designated for Rural/Agriculture land use. 

(d)         Existing or designated industrial districts (except for vocational schools).

(e)         Any area where the nature of existing or proposed adjacent land uses would endanger the safety of students or decrease the effective provision of education.

Policy 5.3.2      Elementary and middle schools are encouraged to locate:

(a)         within existing or proposed residential areas or village centers, and 

(b)         near existing or designated public facilities such as parks, recreational areas, libraries, and community centers to facilitate the joint use of these areas.

Policy 5.3.3      To ensure the safety of children, elementary schools shall be located on paved roads. Direct access should be available from local or collector streets, or from arterials with an interior road to the school.

Policy 5.3.4      To ensure accessibility, middle and senior high schools shall be located near arterial streets.

Policy 5.3.5      To ensure safety and accessibility, all schools shall be linked with surrounding residential areas by bikeways and sidewalks.

Policy 5.3.6      Alachua County shall collocate public facilities such as parks, recreational areas, libraries, and community centers with schools to the extent possible.

Policy 5.3.7     

(a)         Public educational facilities shall be allowable uses in the following land use categories designated on the Future Land Use Map:

(1)         Urban Residential: Low density, Medium density, Medium-high density, and High density ranges.

(2)         Institutional, within the urban cluster.

(b)         Public educational facilities may also be allowed as conditional uses in activity centers, institutional areas designated outside of the urban cluster, and other land use categories.

(c)         Land proposed for donation for school sites shall comply with Future Land Use Element Policy 7.1.10.

(d)         Private educational facilities shall be allowable uses in Medium Density, Medium-High Density, and High Density Residential, Institutional, Office, Commercial, Light Industrial, and Industrial, within specific zoning districts subject to performance criteria in the land development regulations directed toward the specific characteristics of private schools.

(e)         Private educational facilities may be allowed through the special use permit process in other land use categories.

(f)          Land development regulations for public and private educational facilities shall include reasonable development standards and conditions, and shall provide for consideration of the site plan’s adequacy as it relates to environmental concerns, health, safety, and general welfare, promotion of safe pedestrian and bicycle access with interconnections to related uses, and effects on adjacent property.

Policy 5.3.8      Existing schools shall be considered consistent with the Comprehensive Plan. If the School Board of Alachua County submits an application to expand an existing school site, the County may impose reasonable development standards and conditions on the expansion only, and in a manner consistent with Florida Statutes.  Standards and conditions may not be imposed which conflict with those established in the Florida Statutes or the State Uniform Building Code, unless mutually agreed.  In accordance with Florida Statutes, site plan review or approval shall not be required for:

(a)         The placement of temporary or portable classroom facilities; or

(b)         Proposed renovation or construction on existing school sites, with the exception of construction that changes the primary use of a facility, includes stadiums, or results in a greater than 5 percent increase in student capacity, or as mutually agreed.

Policy 5.3.9      Day care centers shall be allowable uses in Medium Density, Medium-High Density, and High Density Residential, Institutional, Office, Commercial, Light Industrial, and Industrial, within specific zoning districts subject to performance criteria in the land development regulations.  Day care centers may be allowed through the development review process in other land use categories as specified in the land development regulations.

Policy 5.3.10   University of Florida properties which are designated in the Campus Master Plan shall be identified on the Alachua County Future Land Use Map.  Development of these properties shall be in accordance with the Campus Master Plan and Campus Development Agreement as provided in Policy 1.1.7 of the Intergovernmental Coordination Element.

OBJECTIVE 5.4 -  COMMUNITY SERVICES

Policy 5.4.1      CIVIC AND GOVERNMENT FACILITIES:  Civic and government facilities, including future branch libraries, should be located on transit routes, in activity centers, village centers, or near other community services to ensure accessibility.

Policy 5.4.1.1  Libraries shall not be located in the Noise Sensitive District or Noise Attenuation Area.

Policy 5.4.1.2  Civic and government facilities may be permitted in all land use categories designated on the Future Land Use Map through the special use permit process, subject to performance criteria regarding  site size, scale, and dimensions, building coverage, parking, buffering, access, and other impacts.

Policy 5.4.2      FIRE PROTECTION:      Fire stations shall be located so as to provide the most cost effective, efficient protection of life and property.

Policy 5.4.2.1  Fire stations may be permitted in all land use categories designated on the Future Land Use Map through the special use permit process, subject to performance criteria regarding site size, scale, and dimensions, building coverage, parking, buffering, access, and other impacts.

Policy 5.4.3      LAW ENFORCEMENT: Law enforcement facilities should be located near the center of the area to be serviced with access to major streets.

Policy 5.4.3.1  Law enforcement facilities may be permitted in all land use categories designated on the Future Land Use Map through the special use permit process, subject to performance criteria regarding site size, scale, and dimensions, building coverage, parking, buffering, access, and other impacts.

Policy 5.4.4      EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE:          Emergency Medical Service (EMS) facilities shall be located near the center of the area to be serviced with access to major streets.

Policy 5.4.4.1  Emergency Medical Service facilities may be permitted in all land use categories designated on the Future Land Use Map  through the special use permit process, subject to performance criteria regarding site size, scale, and dimensions, building coverage, parking, buffering, access, and other impacts.

Policy 5.4.5      HEALTH FACILITIES:                  Major health facilities should be accessible by mass transit.

Policy 5.4.5.1  Medical support facilities and services shall locate in close proximity to hospitals.

Policy 5.4.5.2  New major health facilities, e.g., hospitals and medical complexes, shall be located in areas designated for Institutional/Medical land uses on the Future Land Use Map. This land use category shall also provide for related facilities such as pharmacies, medical suppliers, lodging, restaurants, and accessory facilities, subject to performance standards in the land development regulations.

Policy 5.4.5.3 Other health facilities such as outpatient medical clinics, including emergency facilities, may be allowed in the urban cluster in areas designated on the Future Land Use Map for Institutional, Institutional/Medical, Commercial, Medium-High Density Residential, and High Density Residential, as well as within Transit-Oriented Developments and Traditional Neighborhood Developments. Performance criteria

which address site size, scale, intensity, parking, buffering, access, and other impacts associated with such uses shall be provided in the land development regulations.

(a)         Nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and continuing care communities that provide some combination of housing, housekeeping services, personal care services, and medical care services are allowable in areas designated on the Future Land Use Map for Medium Density Residential in addition to the areas listed in Policy 5.4.5.3 above.  The land development regulations shall provide for zoning and development standards which address site size, scale, intensity, parking, buffering, access, and other impacts associated with such uses.

Policy 5.4.5.4  Outpatient clinics, including emergency facilities, may be allowed in areas designated for Rural/Agricultural uses and Rural Clusters on the Future Land Use Map subject to performance criteria regarding site size, scale, and dimensions, building coverage, parking, buffering, access, and other impacts.

Policy 5.4.6      COMMUNITY SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS:  Community Service Organizations, such as voluntary organizations and clubs engaged in civic, charitable, and related activities, shall be considered as institutional uses.  Special provisions shall be made in the land development regulations to address the unique needs of those uses, including criteria regarding site size, scale, and dimensions, building coverage, parking, buffering, access, clientele, and other impacts. Some activities not typical for residential areas such as the provision of temporary residences, homeless shelters, and community residential homes not otherwise exempted by Florida Statutes may be allowed in the urban cluster through the special use permit process. New homeless shelters shall be subject to performance criteria regarding site, size, scale, and dimensions, building coverage, parking, buffering, access, and other impacts.

Policy 5.4.7      CORRECTIONS FACILITIES: New corrections facilities shall be located away from residential neighborhoods in areas designated for Institutional/Corrections land uses on the Future Land Use Map. Potential locations shall be based on factors such as adequate infrastructure, environmental concerns, and access issues.

OBJECTIVE 5.5 -  PUBLIC UTILITY, COMMUNICATION, OR INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES

Infrastructure and utility structures, such as communication towers, personal wireless service facilities, radio and television antennas, water and sewer, and energy generation and distribution facilities shall be designed and located to eliminate or minimize adverse visual impacts on the landscape.

Policy 5.5.1      Public utilities distribution facilities (electrical, gas, telephone, and cable) shall be located in common corridors where practical from an engineering and economic standpoint to reduce land costs and to minimize the impacts of exposing new land to such uses.  The land development regulations shall specify the factors that would be applicable to the location of such utilities distribution facilities in common corridors to the extent such locational decisions are within the County’s legal authority. Factors that shall be addressed in determining practicality include things such as compliance with federal, state and local codes, safety and maintenance requirements relating to horizontal and vertical separation of facilities, soil and subsurface conditions and structures, efficiency and sustainable delivery to the end user, and ability of different utility providers to secure necessary coordination with other providers in a timely manner.

(a)         Public utilities shall be permitted in all land use categories subject to appropriate locational criteria in the land development regulations.

(b)         New public utilities distribution lines within new developments shall be located underground. New public utilities distribution lines within rights-of-way shall be located underground to the maximum extent possible. The financial responsibility for the additional cost of underground facilities shall be borne directly by the developer and/or owners of the properties to be served by the underground facilities, or by the entity requiring those facilities to placed underground.  The County shall coordinate with local municipalities and public utilities to implement this policy in accordance with Florida Public Service Commission statutes, rules and regulations or other processes authorized by law.

(c)         The County shall coordinate with public utilities to provide for use of utility corridors as part of open space systems, including public walking trails or linkages to greenways.

Policy 5.5.2      Sanitary landfills, solid waste transfer stations, and regional sewage treatment plants shall be adequately buffered from residential neighborhoods.

Policy 5.5.3      A future Institutional/County solid waste management facility, known as Balu Forest, is designated on the Future Land Use Map to be held in reserve as a future solid waste management facility site.  Should the need arise and should  there be no other environmentally safe or economic option available Balu Forest should be considered for a solid waste management facility site. Development of the solid waste management facility shall be subject to the issuance of a site-specific special use permit by the Board of County Commissioners.  Any special use permit issued shall include the provision that no construction shall begin until necessary federal, state, regional and local permits and approvals have been obtained. The County shall initiate a comprehensive plan amendment to consider the redesignation of the alternate site, known as Site Delta.

Policy 5.5.4      Landfills and transfer systems shall be designed to have a minimal impact on the environment.  The use of tires, plastics or plastic derived materials as a fuel source or as feedstock for a waste to energy facility is prohibited. Exceptions to this policy may be allowed for research and development activities by special exception when approved by the Board of County Commissioners. Additional standards including limitations on scale and environmental and safety standards shall be included in the Unified Land Development Code for such research and development activities.

OBJECTIVE 5.6  -  RELIGIOUS FACILITIES

Policy 5.6.1      Houses of worship, churches, or places of religious assembly shall be considered to be institutional uses. Religious facilities may be permitted in all land use categories designated on the Future Land Use Map subject to performance criteria regarding minimum site size, scale, and dimensions, building coverage, parking, buffering, access, and other impacts.

OBJECTIVE 5.7  -   CEMETERIES

Policy 5.7.1      Cemeteries may be permitted in all land use categories designated on the Future Land Use Map through the special use permit process, subject to performance criteria regarding minimum site size, scale, and dimensions, building coverage, parking, buffering, access, and other impacts.

OBJECTIVE 5.8  -   PERSONAL WIRELESS SERVICE FACILITIES

Policy 5.8.1      The County shall facilitate the deployment of personal wireless services and facilities (PWSFs) in a manner that balances needs for economic development, environmental protection, and minimization of adverse visual impacts in Alachua County.  PWSFs should:                         

(a)         use existing structures not originally built as antenna mounts, including, but not limited to rooftops, utility poles, and church steeples.

(b)         use the least obtrusive mount for deploying service, including minimizing the height and silhouette to have the minimum visual impact possible;

(c)         be located, sited, and designed in a way that minimizes the adverse visual impact on the community.

(d)         be located in such a way as to avoid impacting view corridors, vistas, and viewsheds.

(e)         if ground-mounted, not be located in environmentally sensitive areas or passive recreation areas within Alachua County parks.

(f)          not be placed or constructed on a historic structure, landmark or site that is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places or is deemed of historic value by the State of Florida or Alachua County.

(g)         not be located in conservation areas.

(h)         not be located where the potential for bird kills is shown to exist.

6.0 RURAL AND AGRICULTURAL POLICIES

OBJECTIVE 6.1 - GENERAL

Rural and agricultural areas shall be protected in a manner consistent with the retention of agriculture, open space, and rural character, and the preservation of environmentally sensitive areas, and efficient use of public services and facilities.

Policy 6.1.1      The County shall encourage the continuation of productive agricultural uses through an integrated program of strategies, including innovative land use regulations in conjunction with transfer of development rights and support for use of local, State, and Federal incentives including pursuit of funds from state and federal programs for purchase of agricultural conservation easements and purchase of development rights. The County shall initiate a stewardship program utilizing strategies from but not limited to the Rural and Family Lands Protection Act, Section 163.3177 (11) (d) F.S. and Section 570.70, F.S., as appropriate to Alachua County. 

Policy 6.1.2      Protection of important agricultural areas, based on factors such as the existing agricultural uses, soils, land use patterns, and economics of the county’s agricultural community, shall be encouraged.

Policy 6.1.3      The most recent, applicable best management practices for agriculture and silviculture shall be required consistent with Section 5.5, Agricultural and Silvicultural Practices, of the Conservation and Open Space Element. The County shall encourage sustainable and conservation-oriented agricultural practices for agriculture and silviculture, and shall work with landowners to facilitate participation in the County’s Transfer of Development Rights program, voluntary certification programs whose standards meet or exceed best management practices, agricultural and conservation easements, and federal and state cost-share programs. The land development regulations shall be reviewed for the inclusion of incentives to encourage voluntary participation in certification programs.

Policy 6.1.4      The County shall support the development of markets and programs that promote the sale of locally produced agricultural goods, including but not limited to farmers markets, community gardens, farm to institution programs, and agritourism opportunities. The County shall partner with local community groups and organizations and other local governments to pursue funding sources for the development of a sustainable local food system.

Policy 6.1.5      Agricultural pursuits shall be allowed in all land use classifications, provided that the health, safety and welfare of the general public and the protection of the natural environment are assured.  The land development regulations shall include standards for agricultural pursuits and related uses in the Urban Cluster, including but not limited to farmers markets, community gardens, laying hens, and other small scale agricultural uses as allowable uses in appropriate areas.

Policy 6.1.5.1  In order to provide access to fresh, nutritious local foods in the Urban Cluster, farmers markets shall be allowed in the Cluster within mixed-use and non-residential areas as permitted uses subject to the standards provided in the land development regulations and site plan approval by the Development Review Committee.

Policy 6.1.5.2  Community gardens shall be allowed in the Urban Cluster in areas with an urban residential land use designation, mixed-use areas or in Activity Centers as permitted uses subject to the standards provided in the land development regulations and administrative approval by the Growth Management Department.

Policy 6.1.5.3  The land development regulations shall include standards for the allowance of laying hens in residential areas within the Urban Cluster, such as standards for coops/runs, setbacks, and number of hens permitted per lot.

Policy 6.1.5.4  The land development regulations shall include standards for the allowance of other small scale agricultural uses in residential areas within the Urban Cluster, such as aquaculture, apiculture, poultry and rabbit raising.

Policy 6.1.6      The land development regulations shall specify performance criteria and standards for intensive agricultural operations such as concentrated animal feeding operations and dairies to ensure protection of water quality and natural systems.

Policy 6.1.7      Clean debris and construction and demolition debris landfills may be permitted through the special use permit process in areas identified as Rural/Agriculture, subject to performance criteria in the land development regulations, including the protection of groundwater quality.

Policy 6.1.8      The land development regulations shall include thresholds that address the size, intensity and impacts of off-site agricultural product packaging and processing facilities and wood product processing and wood manufacturing facilities, below which such uses may be appropriately located in areas identified as Rural/Agriculture. Uses exceeding the established thresholds shall either be allowed in areas identified as Industrial on the Future Land Use Map or processed as a materials oriented industrial use in the Rural/Agriculture area subject to a Comprehensive Plan Amendment in accordance with Policy 4.1.1, Section 4.0, Industrial, of the Future Land Use Element.  The land development regulations shall provide standards for wood product processing and wood manufacturing facilities that may be allowed in Rural/Agriculture areas subject to Board of County Commissioners approval in order to ensure compatibility with surrounding uses and minimize or eliminate impacts to natural resources. Standards shall address at a minimum hours of operation, buffering and screening, hazardous materials and wood waste management, setbacks, ingress and egress, parking, sales, product storage and display, and shall require the use of best management practices to minimize or eliminate impacts to natural resources and surrounding properties such as use of reclaimed wood products, reuse of scrap materials and recycling of wood product on-site and noise, odor and air pollution controls.

OBJECTIVE 6.2 - RURAL/AGRICULTURE

Areas identified for Rural/Agriculture on the Future Land Use Map are for agricultural activities including forestry and other agricultural uses, such as cattle grazing, cultivation of field crops, vegetable crops, dairies and those commercial or other uses on a limited scale serving or ancillary to agricultural activities, such as farm equipment and supplies, sales or service, farmers’ markets, agritourism activities, composting, limited agricultural processing and wood product processing and wood manufacturing as provided in Policy 6.1.8 above, and agricultural products distribution. Rural residential uses, home-based businesses, rural event centers, heritage tourism and ecotourism activities, resource-based recreation and outdoor activity-based recreation are also allowed. Other uses involving animals not normally associated with agricultural activities, which would be suitable in the Rural/Agricultural areas, such as animal sanctuaries, kennels, and commercial animal raising, may be approved by the County Commission. New residential uses at a maximum density of one dwelling unit per five acres shall be permitted subject to the restrictions in Policy 6.2.7, except that the total allowable dwelling units may be increased pursuant to the Planned Development-Transfer of Development Rights program in accordance with 6.2.5.1 or the incentive bonuses for clustering of rural residential subdivisions in accordance with Policies 6.2.9 - 6.2.14.

Policy 6.2.1      Road construction to support new development in the Rural/Agricultural area shall be the responsibility of the private land developer. Public funds may be allocated to roads designated as part of the State primary and County road system or those roads determined to be needed for the benefit of the general public and designated for construction by the State or Board of County Commissioners. The County shall only assume operation and maintenance responsibilities for a road that is dedicated to the County and that meets the standards of the Subdivision Regulations and the Transportation Mobility Element.

Policy 6.2.1.1  Safety improvements shall be appropriate in any area of the County.

Policy 6.2.2      Central water and sanitary sewer lines shall not be extended into the Rural/Agricultural area, unless these services are needed to correct a public or environmental health threat, or as necessary for the efficient delivery of services to the Urban Cluster,  as provided in the adopted Potable Water and Sanitary Sewer element.

Policy 6.2.3      Stormwater facilities consistent with the level of service standards for drainage shall be required as a condition of new development.

Policy 6.2.4      The land development regulations shall insure adequate internal traffic circulation on dedicated local roads and shall minimize driveway access to rural collector and arterial roads. 

Policy 6.2.5      Parcels containing natural resource areas as identified in the Conservation and Open Space Element shall be conserved in accordance with those policies, such that the natural functions of the resource area are not significantly altered.  This shall be accomplished either through clustering of new developments in accordance with Policy 6.2.9 through 6.2.14 below, or  for developments of less than 25 lots that might not be clustered in accordance with these policies, through a development plan that assures the  permanent protection of natural resources consistent with the requirements of the Conservation and Open Space Element; the land development regulations shall detail the requirements for management and permanent  protection of the ecological value of natural resources in those developments that are not clustered through  legally enforceable mechanisms that provide protection of those resources equivalent to the protection under Policies 6.2.12(c) through 6.2.12(e).

Policy 6.2.5.1  In order to implement COSE Policy 4.10.6, Planned Developments with Transfers of Development (PD-TDR) may be proposed for two or more separate parcels under the same ownership to facilitate transfers of development rights from regulated conservation areas, as defined in Conservation and Open Space Element Policy 3.1.1, to less sensitive areas designated as Rural/Agriculture on the Future Land Use Map.  The PD-TDR will allow units of density to be transferred from one or more contiguous parcels (sending parcels) to one or more geographically separate parcels (receiving parcels).  All parcels involved shall be rezoned as PD-TDR-S or PD-TDR-R.  As a result of the transfer, receiving parcels may be developed at a gross density that exceeds that provided on the receiving parcel by the Rural/Agriculture land use category.  The process and standards for PD/TDR developments shall be consistent with rural clustering policies with the following additional requirements:

(a)         The parcel (s) from which density will be transferred shall be designated PD-TDR-S on the zoning map.   The parcel receiving the density shall be designated PD-TDR-R.  The sending parcel shall be so designated in perpetuity unless both the sending and receiving parcels are considered for rezoning simultaneously and the overall density in the rural area is not increased.

(b)         The maximum number of units that can be transferred shall be the lesser of:

(1)         The number of units that could be developed on the sending parcel(s) under the Rural/Agriculture maximum gross density of 1 units per 5 acres, plus bonus units consistent with Policy 6.2.10(d); or

(2)         The number of upland acres, excluding wetlands and wetland buffers, on the sending parcel(s).

(c)         The sending parcel(s) must be at least 50% field-verified conservation areas, as defined in Conservation and Open Space Element Policy 3.1.1.  The sending parcels shall include all individual parcels that have been created after the adoption of this amendment to the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan or from a date 5 years prior to the application for a PD-TDR, whichever is later.

(d)         Units not transferred to an initial receiving parcel(s) as part of the original PD-TDR approval shall remain with the sending parcel(s).  At a subsequent time, the remaining units may only be directed to additional receiving parcels by way of a major amendment to the approved PD-TDR Master Plan.  All sending and receiving parcels shall be identified on the PD-TDR Master Plan.

(e)         Sending parcels shall be designated as conservation management areas on the PDTDR Master Plan. Residential densities of one dwelling unit per 40 acres to one dwelling unit per 200 acres may be retained on the sending areas where consistent with a Conservation Management Plan. Retained density must be clustered on the least sensitive portion of the property. The amount of density to be retained shall be based on what is necessary to protect the integrity of the ecological system and conservation resources.

(f)          Development of receiving parcels shall be consistent with COSE policies 3.1.1 - 3.1.3 and the objectives and policies in COSE 3.6.

(g)         An area equal to at least 50% of the combined acreage of the sending and receiving areas for a PD-TDR shall be permanently set aside as open space on the sending parcel(s).  Additionally, a minimum of 20% of the receiving parcel(s) shall be designated as open space consistent with COSE Policy 5.2.2.

(h)         The maximum density allowed on the receiving parcel will be the number of units based on the Rural/Agriculture land use designation for the receiving area, plus the additional units transferred from the sending area, subject to the minimum lot size requirements for developed areas of rural clustered subdivisions specified in Policy 6.2.13. Allowance of this maximum density shall be subject to an evaluation of factors, including: proximity to developed areas; availability and capacity of public infrastructure and services; environmental suitability; and compatibility with surrounding land uses.  A finding shall be made whether or not the receiving parcel location and proposed density are appropriate based on these factors.

(i)          The land development regulations shall include provisions to assure implementation of the planned development as a unified development plan.

RURAL RESIDENTIAL SUBDIVISIONS

Policy 6.2.6      No subdivision may be created without paved public road access and all subdivisions created must have internal paved roads that meet county standards, except as provided under Policy 6.2.6.1 below. Residential subdivisions of more than six lots in the Rural/Agricultural area shall be designed to provide:

(a)         Paved, interconnected, internal, and local roads that are dedicated to a responsible maintenance entity.

(b)         Limited driveways, including the use of common access driveways, on rural collector and arterial roads.

(c)         Paved public road access.

Policy 6.2.6.1  Subdivisions of no more than six lots may be created from any parent parcel existing as of October 2, 1991, with access to a private easement road internal to the subdivision if such internal subdivision road provides a direct connection to a public road with sufficient right of way to meet county standards.  Such internal subdivision roads must meet county standards for minimum width, stabilization requirements, and maintenance.  A parent parcel, existing as of October 2, 1991, shall not be divided into more than six lots without having paved roads throughout the subdivision.

Policy 6.2.7      The Development Review Committee shall not authorize more than 150 lots smaller than eight acres in the Rural/Agricultural area in any calendar year except for lots that are clustered according to the provisions of 6.2.9 – 6.2.14.

Policy 6.2.8      New rural residential subdivisions of parcels legally created prior to October 2, 1991, which contain more than 100 lots, including cumulative phases or continued subdivision of land in common ownership or partnership as of October 2, 1991, shall be allowed only after adoption of a comprehensive plan amendment based on a completed special area study. This study, developed through the Community Planning Program, shall address factors such as transportation impacts, community services, fire protection, impacts on surrounding land uses, and environmental issues. This requirement for a comprehensive plan amendment is not applicable to a rural residential subdivision that exceeds 100 lots as a result of incentive density bonuses for clustering.

Policy 6.2.9      Clustering

The preferred design for new rural residential subdivisions is that they be clustered in order to protect the characteristics and features of rural areas through the following goals:         

(a)         Protect natural and historic resources.

(b)         Support continued agricultural activities by preserving viable soils and effective land masses.

(c)         Minimize land use conflicts.

(d)         Provide recreational and habitat corridors through linked open space networks.

(e)         Achieve flexibility, efficiency, and cost reduction in the provision of services and infrastructure.

(f)          Reduce natural hazard risks to life and property.

Policy 6.2.10   Density and Intensity

The overall development density shall not exceed the maximum gross density of one dwelling unit per five acres for the Rural/Agriculture land use category, except as a result of the provisions for accessory dwelling units found in Policy 6.2.10.1, family homestead exceptions found in Policy 6.2.14(c), temporary permits issued by the Growth Management Department or as a result of incentive bonuses for clustering as provided under subsection (d) below, subject to the resource protection standards in the Conservation and Open Space Element.  These standards include the following requirements:

(a)         Impacts to wetlands and surface waters shall be avoided, minimized, and mitigated in accordance with Conservation and Open Space Element Policies 4.7.4. and 4.6.6.

(b)         Density and open space requirements for new rural residential subdivisions shall be consistent with requirements for adequate protection of conservation areas in Conservation and Open Space Element Objective 3.6.

(c)         Development of property that is determined to be a strategic ecosystem shall require a special area plan pursuant to Conservation and Open Space Element Objective 4.10 unless it is determined that sufficient protection can be achieved through clustering.

(d)         As an incentive to cluster new residential subdivisions, if a new residential subdivision in the Rural/Agriculture area is clustered with a minimum of 50% of the development in open space, a total of 2 units in addition to the number units based on the gross density of 1 unit per 5 acres are allowed, plus 1 additional unit per every 10 acres of conservation area set aside as open space; plus 1 additional unit per every 20 acres non-conservation area set aside as open space.

Policy 6.2.10.1         To provide for a greater range of choices of housing types, affordable housing, and the promotion of infill into existing neighborhoods while maintaining rural character, one accessory dwelling unit shall be allowed on residential lots in the Rural/Agriculture area without being included in gross residential density calculations as follows.

(a)         Performance criteria shall be detailed in the land development regulations and include elements such as size, site design, access, and parking requirements. In no instance shall an accessory dwelling unit be permitted on a lot with less than one acre of buildable area outside the boundaries of any conservation areas.

(b)         Prior to the issuance of a building permit for the construction of an accessory dwelling unit in an existing residential area, the applicant shall provide proof of homestead exemption status establishing ownership and principal residence of the lot.

(c)         Permanent occupancy by the owner of either the primary or accessory dwelling unit shall be required for all accessory dwelling units.

(d)         The accessory dwelling unit shall meet all applicable requirements of the Florida Department of Health for the well and septic system.

Policy 6.2.11   Design Sequence

The design of rural residential clustered subdivisions shall be sequenced according to the following four-step process:

(a)         Identify open space area, including natural resources consistent with Conservation and Open Space Element Section 3, agricultural areas, and potential open space network connections consistent with Conservation and Open Space Element Section 6.3.

(b)         Identify developed area and locate home sites.

(c)         Align streets and trails.

(d)         Delineate lot lines.

Policy 6.2.12   Open Space Area in Clustered Subdivisions

A portion of a clustered rural residential subdivision shall be designated and maintained as undeveloped open space area.

(a)         Percentage of site.  Clustered Rural residential subdivisions shall designate a minimum of 50% of the site as open space area.

(b)         Design Principles.  Open space shall be selected and designed according to the following principles, consistent with Conservation and Open Space Element policies for the identification and protection of natural resources:

(1)         Protect natural, historic, and paleontological resources and agricultural areas of the site identified through a site specific inventory.

a.           Conservation areas shall receive top priority for inclusion as part of the designated open space area, and may only be impacted in accordance with Conservation and Open Space Element policies specific to the resource.

b.           Agricultural areas with viable soils and effective land masses shall be included as part of the designated open space area after resource protection criteria are met. Agricultural uses are encouraged to be included as part of the designated open space area.

c.           Historic and paleontological resources shall be included as part of the designated open space area when appropriate in accordance with the Historic Preservation Element.

(2)         Design the open space area as a single contiguous area with logical, straightforward boundaries to eliminate or minimize fragmentation.

(3)         Form linked open space networks with existing or potential open space areas on adjacent properties, other developments, or greenways, consistent with Conservation and Open Space Element Section 6.3.

(c)         Permitted uses.

(1)         Permitted uses in the open space area are natural resource conservation areas, non-intensive agriculture including community gardens, silviculture, and common open space, resource-based recreation uses which maintain the undeveloped area in a natural state, permeable stormwater facilities consistent with Stormwater Element Policy 5.1.9, community energy systems, and common water supply systems and common septic system drainfields. A residential unit used as a homestead just prior to the creation of the clustered subdivision can continue to be used as a homestead within the open space area and not counted toward the total number of units allowed in the rural clustered subdivision.

(2)         More intensive agriculture uses such as concentrated animal density generally associated with milking barns, feed lots, chicken houses, or holding pens shall not be allowed in any clustered rural residential subdivision.

(d)         Permanent protection.  All future development in designated open space areas is prohibited.

(1)         All open space shall be maintained and remain undeveloped in perpetuity using a legal instrument that runs with the land to set forth conditions and restrictions on use.

(2)         All open space area and lots shall be restricted from further subdivision through an instrument in a form acceptable to the county and duly recorded in the public record which assures the preservation and continued maintenance of the open space.

(3)         The boundaries of designated open space areas shall be clearly delineated on plans, including record plats, and marked in the field to distinguish these areas from developed areas.

(e)         Ownership, maintenance, and management plan.

(1)         Ownership methods.  Ownership and maintenance of open space shall be by one or a combination of the following:

a.           Original landowner

b.           Homeowners association

c.           Established land trust

d.           Non-profit conservation organization

e.           Alachua County, with county approval

f.            Other public agency (e.g. Water Management District)

(2)         Maintenance.  Unless otherwise agreed by the County, the cost and responsibility of maintaining common facilities, including but not limited to open space, private roads, shared water systems, and stormwater systems, shall be borne by the owner(s) of the open space.  If the open space is not properly maintained, the County may assume responsibility of maintenance and charge the property owner or homeowners association a fee which covers maintenance and administrative costs.

(3)         Management plan.  An open space management plan shall be required to accompany the development plan, subject to county review and approval.  The management plan shall establish management objectives, outline procedures, and define the roles and responsibilities for managing the open space.  Management shall include wildfire mitigation.

Policy 6.2.13   Developed Area

The developed area of the clustered rural residential subdivision shall be located outside the open space area. The land development regulations shall prescribe in detail design standards for the configuration of lots and homes, the provision of water and wastewater, roads, stormwater, and buildings and structures.  At a minimum, all developed areas must be designed to comply with the following principles, to the extent feasible considering the location and protection of natural resources:

(a)         Flexible home siting and lot sizes.  Diversity and originality in home siting, lot size and design are encouraged to achieve the best possible relationship between the development and the features on the land through the following strategies:

(1)         Ownership lines should follow existing features, such as tree lines or contours.

(2)         Lots smaller than one acre may be allowed provided that well and septic System configuration, location, and operation and maintenance comply with public health and environmental quality standards, subject to the following:

a.           The number of lots less than one acre shall be determined and located consistent with Conservation and Open Space Element Policies 3.6.11 and 4.5.5(f).

b.           Common septic systems may be utilized to serve lots less than one acre, consistent with Conservation and Open Space Element Policy 4.5.5(f), subject to performance criteria in the land development regulations specifying criteria such as system configuration, location, and management.

(b)         Development impacts within developed area. Development impacts and disturbance caused by buildings or construction to topography and existing site features within the developed area shall be minimized through the following strategies:

(1)         Locating residences and structures adjacent to tree lines and wooded field edges and avoiding placement in open fields, consistent with Firewise principles.

(2)         Preserving the maximum amount of natural vegetation by careful siting of development.

(3)         Limiting the size of building envelopes and locating them in areas most suitable for development.

(4)         Locating roads to minimize cut and fill (follow existing features, e.g. tree lines, access roads, contours).

(5)         Providing buffers and setbacks from wetlands and surface waters.

(6)         Use of common driveways.

(7)         Encouraging community wells and septic systems within the most suitable soils.

(8)         Designing stormwater to maximize overland flow through natural drainage systems and grassed overland (roadside and lot line) swales. The use of plants and natural land forms shall be required to slow, hold, and treat runoff from development.

(c)         Development impacts to open space and adjacent offsite areas. The total amount of impacts and disturbance to the site, including the open space area, and to adjacent areas offsite shall be minimized through strategies such as:

(1)         Providing buffers and setbacks to protect resources and natural vegetation from development impacts consistent with Conservation and Open Space Element Section 3.6.

(2)         Providing buffers and setbacks to protect the ability to engage in agricultural activities in neighboring areas. The width and type of buffer shall be based on the scale of the agricultural activity and other site specific factors such as topography, and shall include a minimum buffer width of two hundred feet when the developed area is adjacent to intensive agricultural uses.

(3)         Locating developed areas and providing buffers and setbacks to eliminate or minimize the presence of development from adjacent properties.

(d)         Development impacts to adjacent public roads shall be minimized through the following strategies:

(1)         Providing internal paved local roads, or private easements that serve no more than six lots consistent with Future Land Use Element Policy 6.2.6, which meet County standards and minimize access to adjacent public roads.

(2)         Minimizing the number of driveways accessing adjacent public roads and the number of lots with direct frontage on adjacent public roads.

(3)         Locating developed areas and providing buffers and setbacks to minimize the presence of development from adjacent public roads.

Policy 6.2.14                 Applicability

(a)         New rural residential subdivisions of parcels legally created prior to October 2, 1991, consisting of 25 or more lots shall be clustered according to the policies and requirements under this section.

(b)         New rural residential subdivisions meeting all requirements for cluster development may be allowed through the development review process, provided they are consistent with Comprehensive Plan policies and land development regulations.

(c)         Exceptions to the density and intensity standards in the Rural/Agriculture area may be granted for use of a parcel as a homestead by family members that meet the family relationship criteria under Future Land Use Element Policy 7.1.20 as provided in the Land Development Regulations.

(d)         Alternatives to the requirements for Rural/Agricultural areas may be established by special area plans adopted jointly by Alachua County and a municipality pursuant to Interlocal agreements under Section 1.5 of the Alachua County Charter and Policy 1.1.1 of the Intergovernmental Coordination Element of the County Comprehensive Plan.  Such special area plans shall establish policies for land use and other relevant issues such as provision of infrastructure and services within areas delineated in such joint special area plans.  In order for these alternative policies to apply, the joint special area plan with a municipality must be adopted as part of the Comprehensive Plans of the both the County and the applicable municipality.

OBJECTIVE 6.3 -   RURAL EMPLOYMENT CENTERS

Rural Employment Centers are recognized as areas outside the urban cluster that can support light industrial and limited commercial uses not otherwise associated with surrounding rural/agricultural land uses. 

Policy 6.3.1      The Future Land Use Map shall depict existing Rural Employment Center boundaries.  The Planned Development (PD) zoning mechanism shall be used for the Employment Center to ensure that proposed development is consistent with the goal, objectives and policies of the Plan. The PD zoning process shall ensure that level of service standards identified in the Plan are met; that proposed development does not adversely impact surrounding properties and that environmental resources are adequately protected.

Policy 6.3.2      Development in a rural employment center may be permitted with lot sizes of one acre or greater for development on private wells and septic tanks (or on lots as small as one-half acre with both a central water and sewer system), consistent with the Potable Water/Sanitary Sewer Element and Conservation and Open Space Element Policy 4.5.5(f).  As part of a designated brownfield site, Alachua County may assist with redevelopment efforts in the Hague Rural Employment Center taking place under the Brownfield Redevelopment Act (F.S. 376.77) including expedited review of development applications.

Policy 6.3.3      The following uses may be permitted within a rural employment center provided that the appropriate policies and standards within the Comprehensive Plan are met.

(a)         Within the Hague Rural Employment Center Only: Business and professional services, retail sales and services, food service, personal services, entertainment and recreation activities and the processing, packaging, warehousing and distribution of agricultural products. Retail sales and services uses shall not exceed 10% of the existing gross square footage within the rural employment center.

(b)            Office uses consistent with 3.9.1 and light industrial uses consistent with Policy 4.3.1.

(c)         Conference and training facilities.

Policy 6.3.4          The following existing rural employment centers are depicted on the Future Land Use map series:

(a)         McGinley Industrial Park, and

(b)         Hague Rural Employment Center.

Policy 6.3.5      Joint ventures in pursuing employment activities between the County and smaller municipalities shall be encouraged within those cities.

Policy 6.3.5.1  The following rural community employment center is depicted on the Future Land Use map series:

(a)         Hawthorne Rural Community Employment Center (SR 20, west of and adjacent to Hawthorne).

(1)         Uses within the rural community employment center should utilize common means of ingress/egress to the maximum extent possible.  Access to SR 20 (Hawthorne Road) shall be minimized in order to preserve and maintain traffic mobility on the roadway, which is part of the Florida Intrastate Highway System.

(2)         Light Industrial land use, research and development oriented, with accessory manufacturing of research and development related products shall be allowed on up to 42 acres in the ECO2 Rural Community Employment Center.

a.           Development of the Light Industrial land uses shall be in the form of a Planned Development.

b.           Maximum Floor Area Ratio shall be .5.

c.           Minimum buffer shall be 25 feet with screening which shall consist of a combination of fencing or landscape material to ensure the height, type, location, and degree of opacity are sufficient to provide an effective visual and acoustical buffer giving consideration to the existing and proposed uses.

d.           Rural/Agricultural land use shall be allowed as an interim land use.  Residential development on Rural/Agriculture land shall be buffered and screened in accordance with Policy 6.3.5.1(a)(2)c.

(3)         Implementation of this Rural Community Employment Center shall be coordinated with the City of Hawthorne, as follow up to annexations of portions of the Rural Community Employment Center by the City of Hawthorne.

OBJECTIVE 6.4 -  RURAL CLUSTERS

Rural clusters are historic rural settlements outside of the urban cluster.  These clusters serve as a focus for an existing rural community.  They generally lack public services and facilities identified as necessary for more intense urban development.  Policies and related development regulations for Rural Clusters shall preserve their existing rural character, ensure compatibility with the surrounding Rural/Agriculture areas, and protect the historic and natural resources which make these communities unique. The following communities are designated as Rural Clusters:

· Cross Creek

· Evinston

· Campville

· Grove Park

· Rochelle

· Windsor

· Lochloosa

· Island Grove

· Orange Heights

· Melrose

· Earleton

· Hague

· Santa Fe

Policy 6.4.1      The County shall initiate proposed Comprehensive Plan amendments to delineate parcel-based boundaries for Rural Clusters on the Future Land Use Map based on the following guidelines in (a) through (e).  Until such time as those boundaries have been delineated, the guidelines in (a) through (e) shall be used to determine how the Rural Cluster land use designation and related policies apply to individual properties. 

(a)         Rural Clusters shall generally include developed areas approximately 1/2 mile from the easily discernable focal point of the cluster. The focal point is usually the intersection of two rural roads or some other prominent feature around which the community seems to be centered. 

(b)         The cluster shall be construed as containing all of the developed areas and undeveloped infill areas, but not undeveloped land beyond the extent of developed areas.

(c)         For the purposes of these guidelines, developed areas include areas with commercial uses, non‑farm residential areas where lot sizes are generally below five acres, and usually below one acre, and other specialized uses not normally found in a rural setting. Platted, undeveloped subdivisions or other pre‑existing developments where densities are higher than one unit per acre should be included, even if not developed, provided that the various lots or parcels are largely in different ownerships. The extent of non-conformity of these lots or parcels from County setback, access, and other regulations shall be considered in determining Rural Cluster boundaries.

(d)         The cluster may contain open space or conservation areas if these areas can be logically included given the other standards listed above.  Such areas in the cluster shall be consistent with policies in the Conservation and Open Space Element.

(e)         Consideration may be given to natural features (including otherwise defined open space or conservation areas) or man‑made features (such as jurisdictional boundaries, highways, railroads, or distinctive land use areas) that help form a logical boundary.

Policy 6.4.2      Residential development within Rural Clusters may be permitted with lot sizes of one acre or greater.

Policy 6.4.3     Commercial or institutional development may be permitted within a rural cluster, subject to the following standards:

(a)         Commercial uses shall be limited to rural support services, retail sales, or personal services intended to serve the immediate population (such as farm implement sales, grocery stores, veterinarian services or clinics to serve the rural and farming community, pharmacies, medical or dental offices, hospitality uses supportive of agritourism and heritage tourism activities, or co-operative or farmers markets to promote the sale of locally grown products.

(b)         There shall be a maximum of up to 30,000 square feet of total commercial floor area for each Rural Cluster.  The amount of commercial development appropriate for any Rural Cluster should be relative to the population being served.  The size and scale of new commercial development or redevelopment shall be consistent with the size and scale of the existing land uses in the Rural Cluster.

(c)         Any new commercial land uses shall be located at the focus or center of the Rural Cluster, near the intersection of major roadways.

(d)         There shall be an interconnected, paved and internal traffic circulation system on dedicated local roads, and minimal development impacts on rural collector and arterial roads.

(e)         Industrial development shall not be allowed.

(f)          Institutional land uses may be permitted in accordance with Section 5.0 of the Future Land Use Element.

Policy 6.4.4   Zoning and development standards shall be established in the Unified Land Development Code to implement the objective and policies for Rural Clusters.  Such standards shall include provisions for integration of any new non-residential development with existing uses in the Rural Clusters, including site and building design measures such as provision of open space, landscaping and buffering, parking lot design, building massing and scale, and limitations on signage and lighting, to produce development that is compatible with the surrounding rural land uses.  

Policy 6.4.5   The County shall consider the development of special area plans for Rural Clusters, where necessary to address unique needs and circumstances that are not addressed through the generally applicable Comprehensive Plan policies.  Any special area plans for Rural Clusters shall:

(a)                   Incorporate the community’s vision and goals

(b)         Protect the historic rural character of the community

(c)         Ensure compatibility of the Rural Cluster with the surrounding ‘Rural/Agriculture’ areas

(d)         Enhance the community’s livability

(e)         Consider the need for community amenities

(f)          Protect natural resources

(g)         Explore opportunities for nature-based and heritage tourism

(h)         Consider opportunities to link Rural Clusters through the use of nature trails, bikeways, etc.

Policy 6.4.6    Any new residential subdivision proposed in a Rural Cluster shall be allowed only after delineation of the Rural Cluster boundaries on the Future Land Use Map pursuant to Policy 6.4.1.

7.0 IMPLEMENTATION

OBJECTIVE 7.1 -   GENERAL

To establish standards through the adopted goals, objectives and policies of the Comprehensive Plan in conjunction with the adopted maps within the Future Land Use Element and within the other elements to guide decisions affecting land use and development. To provide for implementation of the Comprehensive Plan through land development regulations and an ongoing Capital Improvements Program. To provide a process for Plan revision, Map amendments, and establishment of Special Area Plans, incorporating citizen participation.

Policy 7.1.1     The Future Land Use designation within an area considered to be an enclave, as defined in Florida Statutes, shall consider the existing land use, infrastructure, and the Comprehensive Plan of the surrounding municipality.

Policy 7.1.2      Proposed changes in the zoning map shall consider:

(a)         consistency with the goals, objectives, policies and adopted maps of the Comprehensive Plan

(b)         the availability and capacity of public facilities required to serve the development.  When considering a rezoning, this includes availability and capacity of existing public facilities and timing of future facilities based on capital plans.  Specific determinations for any exceptions to the requirement to connect to a centralized potable water and sanitary sewer system will be made at the stage of development plan review, as detailed in Policy 2.1.1 of the Potable Water and Sanitary Sewer Element.

(c)         the relationship of the proposed development to existing development in the vicinity and considerations relating to environmental justice and redevelopment opportunities.

(d)         those factors identified by law, including that as a general matter an applicant is not entitled to a particular density or intensity within the range of densities and intensities permitted by the Comprehensive Plan, given due consideration of legitimate public purposes relating to health, safety, and welfare

Policy 7.1.3    As part of the periodic update of the Comprehensive Plan and any proposed amendments to the Urban Cluster, determine a sufficient and nonexcessive amount of land within the Urban Cluster to accommodate urban uses for a ten year and twenty year time frame.

(a)         The determination (methodology is shown in Appendix A) shall be based on a comparison of:

(1)         a forecast need for land for urban residential and non-residential development based on projected population, average household size, a residential vacancy rate, and a market factor. The market factor for the ten year time frame shall be 2.0. The market factor for the 20 year time frame shall be 1.5

(2)         land available in the Urban Cluster for urban residential and non-residential uses.  Mapping of environmentally sensitive areas shall be utilized as a factor for determining land availability

(b)         If the comparison shows that the land available is less than the forecast need for land, the following measures shall be considered:

(1)         revisions to density standards and land development regulations, or other measures, to accommodate greater population within the existing Urban Cluster

(2)         coordination with municipalities regarding possible reallocation of forecast need to the incorporated areas

(3)         phased expansion of the Urban Cluster

(c)         If the forecast need for one type of land use exceeds the supply of land for that particular use, a revision to the allocation of land uses within the Urban Cluster shall be considered before the Urban Cluster is expanded.

(d)         If this methodology determines expansion of the Urban Cluster is warranted, the evaluation of appropriate location shall be subject to analysis including the following economic, infrastructure, transportation, and conservation and recreation criteria:

(1)         rural character and viable agriculture land and the potential impact of expansion of the Urban Cluster on existing agricultural uses

(2)         economic development considerations including affordable housing

(3)         relationship to existing and planned future urban services and infrastructure

(4)         access to the regional transportation network and multi-modal transportation systems

(5)         Conservation and Preservation land uses

(6)         planned recreation/open space or greenway systems

(e)         In addition to meeting the requirements identified above, any proposed amendment to expand the Urban Cluster must include a commitment to purchase development rights at a rate equivalent to or greater than the proposed increase in density or intensity through the Transfer of Development Rights program in accordance with Section 9.0 of this Element.

Policy 7.1.4      Urban development shall provide, as part of the development, facilities necessary to accommodate interconnections, such as sidewalks, pedestrian paths, bicycle facilities, connecting roadways, and mass transit facilities needed to accommodate transportation mode shifts.

Policy 7.1.5      As urban development or redevelopment occurs, facilities, and sites for facilities, to connect neighborhoods and public uses, such as sidewalks, pedestrian paths, bicycle facilities, connecting roadways, and mass transit facilities needed to accommodate transportation mode shifts, shall be provided.

(a)         Provision of such sites and facilities shall be based on evaluation of thresholds of development scale and impacts related to demands for use of such facilities. Standards for evaluation and provisions for contribution, dedication, purchase, or other mechanisms shall be provided in the land development regulations.

Policy 7.1.6      Areas designated for urban residential densities are identified on the Future Land Use Map within the urban cluster shown on the map, and certain additional areas representing existing development at urban residential densities.  The policies and densities applicable to the Low Density Residential category shall also apply to that portion of any lot of record existing as of October 2, 1991, which was partially within and partially outside of the urban cluster provided that the area of the lot outside of the urban cluster does not exceed five (5) acres.  The development must be contiguous to the area identified for low density residential land use on the Future Land Use Map and provide the equivalent infrastructure and services.  For purposes of this policy, roadway, conservation, or utility easements shall not preclude contiguity.  Development must be consistent with all Comprehensive Plan policies.

Policy 7.1.7      The development of 480 acres (Parcel #04427-000-000) designated Low Density Residential by the approval of Application #CPA-15-97 shall be developed subject to the following requirements:

(a)         An overall development plan shall be submitted prior to development within the 480-acre area.  The development shall provide for a variety of lot sizes/densities consistent with the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan.

(b)         All development shall be connected to centralized sanitary sewer and centralized potable water supply.

(c)         The 480-acre parcel shall be developed at an average density of not more than two (2) dwelling units per acre.

These site specific requirements may be reconsidered through a public hearing process involving notification to surrounding property owners.

Policy 7.1.8      Buffers shall be required between two adjacent uses as generally described in the Buffer Group Matrix table.

As part of the update of the land development regulations to implement the Comprehensive Plan, buffer requirements shall be further specified, including buffer height and width, amount and type of plant material, and use of walls, fences, and berms.  Use of effective transitional design practices shall be recognized in the land development regulations as an alternative to or in combination with buffers, to integrate development along the edges of different land use categories and within mixed use developments.

(Buffer Group Matrix on next page)

Policy 7.1.9      Buffers may be used for resource based recreation provided that the total buffer remains intact.

Policy 7.1.10   Land proposed to be donated for school sites must be approved by the School Board of Alachua County.  The following minimum size guidelines have been recommended by the School Board:  Elementary School - 25 acres, Middle School - 35 acres, High School - 65 acres.  These guidelines shall not preclude smaller sized sites if determined to be acceptable by the School Board.

Policy 7.1.11   All new development shall meet level of service requirements for roadways, potable water and sanitary sewer, stormwater, solid waste, mass transit, public schools, and improved recreation in accordance with LOS standards adopted in the elements addressing these facilities.

Policy 7.1.12   The concurrency management provisions of the land development regulations shall specify the period for which certification of level of service compliance shall be valid.

Policy 7.1.13   The County shall prepare and annually update a 5 year Capital Improvement Programs in accordance with the Capital Improvements Element of this Plan.

Policy 7.1.14   Development regulations implementing this Future Land Use Element shall be prepared in accordance with and consistent with the Policies and Standards contained herein and adopted within one year of the effective date of this update of this Plan.

Policy 7.1.15   The following policies shall govern existing situations which do not conform to the provisions of the Plan:

(a)         The land development regulations shall provide for the vesting of Developments of Regional Impact (DRI) and developments where development has commenced and is continuing in good faith, in accordance with the provisions of Section 163.3167(8), F.S; and address existing lots of record.

(b)         Nothing in this Comprehensive Plan shall be construed or applied to result in a temporary or permanent taking of private property without due process of law.

(c)         Nothing contained herein shall be construed as affecting validly existing vested rights.  It shall be the duty and responsibility of the person alleging vested rights to demonstrate affirmatively the legal requisites of vested rights.  Rights shall vest based upon a determination according to the standards and procedures adopted by the Board of County Commissioners, including those standards established in Florida case law.

 

BUFFER GROUP MATRIX -- Adjacent Existing Use or / Future Land Use Designation

 

 

 

Agri- culture

 

Low

Density

 

Medium

Density

 

Medium-High Density

 

High Density

 

Office

 

Neighborhood

Convenience

 

Tourist/

Entertainment

 

Roadway

Commercial

 

Activity Center Commercial

 

 

Light

Industry

 

Heavy

Industry

 

Agriculture

 

*

 

Ag

 

Ag

 

Ag

 

Ag

 

*

 

*

 

*

 

*

 

*

 

*

 

*

 

Low Density

 

Ag

 

* 

 

L

 

M

 

H

 

M

 

M

 

M

 

H

 

M - H

 

M - H

 

H

 

Medium Density

 

Ag

 

M

 

*

 

L

 

M

 

L

 

M

 

L - M

 

M

 

L – M

 

M - H

 

H

 

Medium-High Density.

 

Ag

 

H

 

M

 

*

 

L

 

L

 

L – M

 

L - M

 

M

 

L

 

M - H

 

H

 

High Density

 

Ag

 

H

 

M

 

L

 

*

 

L

 

L  - M

 

L - M

 

M

 

L – M

 

M - H

 

H

 

Office

 

*

 

H

 

M

 

M

 

M

 

*

 

L

 

*

 

*

 

* - L

 

L

 

M

 

Neighborhood Convenience

 

*

 

M - H

 

M

 

L - M

 

L - M

 

L

 

*

 

L

 

*

 

* - L

 

L

 

M

 

Tourist Entertainment

 

*

 

M - H

 

L - M

 

L - M

 

L - M

 

*

 

L

 

*

 

L

 

* - L

 

M

 

M

 

Roadway Commercial

 

*

 

H

 

M

 

M

 

M

 

*

 

*

 

L

 

*

 

* - L

 

L

 

M

 

Activity Center Commercial

 

0

 

M - H

 

L - M

 

L

 

L

 

* - L

 

L

 

L

 

L

 

*

 

L

 

M

 

Light Industry

 

*

 

M

 

M

 

M

 

M

 

L

 

L

 

M

 

L

 

LM

 

*

 

L

 

Heavy Industry

 

M

 

H

 

H

 

H

 

H

 

M

 

M

 

M

 

M

 

M

 

L

 

*

BUFFER GROUPS

AG: Combination of hedges and shrubs

L: Low density combination of canopy and understory trees.

M: Medium density combination of canopy and understory trees and shrubs with screening

H: High density combination of canopy and understory trees, shrubs, and evergreen/conifers with screening

*: No buffer required.

Policy 7.1.16   The following general requirements shall be provided for in the land development regulations: 

(a)         Zoning categories shall provide a range of densities, intensities, and uses to implement the future land use categories.  Mixes of different dwelling types shall occur within planned developments, Transit Oriented Developments, and Traditional Neighborhood Developments and shall be encouraged in all residential zoning categories.

(b)         Clustering and other flexible design options shall be permitted through land development regulations.

(c)        Gross density shall be consistent with this Plan, however, provision should be included within the land development regulations for awarding density credit based on provision for inclusionary housing, consistency with green building standards, or where provided in other Elements and Sections of the Comprehensive Plan. In the case of family homestead exceptions or hardship variances, gross density limits established in the Plan may be exceeded provided the other provisions of the implementing zoning district are followed.

(d)       Mixed use developments shall be encouraged.  Commercial development outside of areas specifically designated in accordance with Sections 3 and 6 of this element shall only be permitted within Transit Oriented Developments or Traditional Neighborhood Developments as specified in the Urban Residential policies, including location, density, and design standards.

Policy 7.1.17   The land development regulations shall provide for evaluation of certain uses through processes by which special exceptions, special use permits, and temporary use permits may be granted. These certain uses include uses with intensities or characteristics that may create an adverse impact on surrounding neighborhoods or institutions which are evaluated on a case-by-case basis to ensure that the size, extent and character of that use is compatible with the surrounding uses.  The regula­tions to implement this policy shall identify the general category of uses that will be subject to this process and the specific factors which will be utilized to evaluate whether or not a special exception, special use permit or temporary use permit should be granted.

Policy 7.1.18   The County shall reduce existing land uses that are inconsistent with the provisions of this Comprehensive Plan through regulations addressing non-conforming land uses.

Policy 7.1.19   The County's land development regulations shall include the following provisions for nonconforming lots, structures and uses of land or structures:

(a)       Nonconforming lots of record shall be recognized within any zoning district in which single family dwellings are permitted.  A single family dwelling may be erected, expanded, or altered on any single lot of record, subject to other restrictions in the land development regulations.  Such lots must be in separate ownership and not contiguous to other lots in the same ownership.

(b)         Nonconforming uses of land shall be recognized where the lawful use of land exists which is not permitted by the land development regulations.  Such use may be continued, so long as it remains otherwise lawful, subject to limitation concerning enlargement, movement, discontinuance, and structural addition.

(c)         Nonconforming structures shall be recognized where a structure exists lawfully that would not be permitted to be built under the land development regulations by reason of restrictions on requirements other than use concerning the structure, such structure may be continued so long           as it remains otherwise lawful, subject to limitations concerning provisions addressing enlargement or alteration, destruction, and movement.

Policy 7.1.20   The land development regulations shall provide for the use of a parcel of property solely as a homestead by an individual who is the grandparent, parent, step-parent, adopted parent, sibling, child, stepchild, adopted child, or grandchild of the person who conveyed the parcel to said individual, notwithstanding the density or intensity of use assigned to the parcel by the Future Land Use Map of the Comprehensive Plan.  Such a provision shall apply only once to any individual.  The regulations to implement this policy shall provide procedures for lot splits or subdivision of land for the purpose of conveying a lot or parcel to individuals meeting these requirements for the establishment of a homestead and shall provide for minimum lot size of the lots so created and the remaining lot.  Lot splits or subdivisions of land permitted pursuant to this policy shall be subject to compliance with all other applicable Comprehensive Plan policies and Federal, State, Regional, and County regulations.

Policy 7.1.21   To encourage higher quality, more energy efficient development, an incentive-based development plan scoring system shall be developed in accordance with Policy 3.1.3 of the Energy Element.  Such a system may rate factors such as location, environmental protections, mobility, energy efficiency, and design quality of proposed developments according to a set of performance indicators.

Policy 7.1.22   It shall be the policy of Alachua County to establish a mechanism for consideration of large-scale Comprehensive Plan Amendments, small-scale Comprehensive Plan Amendments and Plan Amendments due to emergency, and amendments due to any proposed Development of Regional Impact, consistent with Section 163.3184 and 163.3187, Florida Statutes.

Policy 7.1.23   All amendments shall be considered based on the applicable policies and objectives of this Element, shall be considered in light of the Basic Principles upon which the Plan is based, and shall be consistent with all Elements of the Plan.

Policy 7.1.24   Prior to amending this Element, every consideration shall first be given to alternatives to detailed map changes.  Such alternatives might include clarifying text amendments and additional policy statements.

Policy 7.1.25   All amendments to the Comprehensive Plan shall meet the requirements of Chapter 163.3181, Florida Statutes for public participation in the comprehensive planning process.

Policy 7.1.26   Land development regulations shall set forth required public participation methods for all comprehensive plan updates and amendments. Land development regulations shall also provide complementary or additional public participation methods to be used.  For comprehensive plan amendments, these complementary methods shall include notification by mail or other methods to persons who own real property proximate to a proposed plan amendment as prescribed in the land development regulations, notifying them of the comprehensive plan amendment, its potential impact, opportunity for written and oral comment to be considered at the public hearings, and the schedule of public hearings.

Policy 7.1.27   A Neighborhood Referral System will enable representative neighborhood organizations to review and comment on land use and development cases prior to planning and zoning decisions made at public hearings by expanding the notification procedures to include neighborhood organizations. Representative neighborhood organizations will also provide a link to County government for educational and service provisions.

Policy 7.1.28   A planning framework that includes geographically focused special area plans shall be implemented to promote and provide cohesive communities.  These plans shall include both rural and urban areas, and utilize neighborhoods (including village centers), districts (including activity centers), and corridors as basic planning components.  This planning framework shall be implemented through a Community and Neighborhood Planning program, which empowers communities and neighborhoods to develop plans that address the specific needs and circumstances of their area.  The County shall provide guidance to the program to assure that county-wide comprehensive planning goals are met.  These plans shall incorporate the community and neighborhood vision and goals and shall include provisions to:

(a)         Enhance the community’s livability

(b)         Protect the character of the neighborhood

(c)         Provide amenities for neighborhood residents

(d)         Plan for neighborhood traffic management

(e)         Protect natural resources

Special Area Plans may form the basis for policies in the Comprehensive Plan focusing on a particular geographic area, Land Development Code provisions for special areas, identification of capital projects to address specific needs and circumstances, or other initiatives by the County or through public/community partnerships.

Policy 7.1.29   A Special Area Plan shall be implemented through the Community and Neighborhood Planning Program to provide for the continuation and enhancement of the traditional character, settlement patterns, and uses of the Arredondo area.

Policy 7.1.30    Annexations shall be in accordance with Florida Statutes, Chapter 171 as specified in Policies under Objective 4.1 of the Intergovernmental Coordination Element.

Policy 7.1.31   The Agricultural Enclave future land use category is established for those properties in the unincorporated area that meet all the criteria of the "agricultural enclave" definition as provided in Section 163.3164(4), Florida Statutes, and for which the Board of County Commissioners approves a comprehensive plan amendment according to the procedures identified in Section 163.3162(4), Florida Statutes. The allowed uses and permitted densities and/or intensities for each area that receives an Agricultural Enclave future land use designation shall be established in the Comprehensive Plan and implemented through Planned Development rezoning.  All other applicable requirements of the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan and Unified Land Development Code for development of a property shall apply.

Policy 7.1.31.1       The 136 acre property to the southeast of the SW Archer Road (SR 24)/SW 107 Street intersection consisting of tax parcels 07075-001-000, 07076-000-000, 07077-000-000, and 07093-000-000 is designated as an Agricultural Enclave on the Future Land Use Map 2011-2030 and allows single family residential units with a maximum density of 0.8 units/acre.

Policy 7.1.32   Existing and future rights-of-way shall, generally, be available for use for utility corridors. However, the design of roadway, transit , bicycle and pedestrian facilities shall have priority in allocation of space within any County-owned right-of-way. Priority shall be placed on the proper allocation of these facilities and any required landscaping, including trees, before considering utility locations. Where location of utilities within rights-of-way conflicts with the primary transportation purpose, utilities shall be located outside the right-of-way, or the right-of-way shall be expanded to allow for utilities to be placed within the right-of-way. Above-ground utility infrastructure shall be designed and located to ensure that users of the right-of-way are safe and comfortable and shall not impact any minimum design standards established in the land development regulations.

Policy 7.1.33   All development and redevelopment within the Urban Cluster,  other than a single-family home, shall be designed in accordance with Traditional Neighborhood Development design standards under Future Land Use Element policies and sub-policies in 1.6.6,  Site and Building Design, 1.6.7 Transportation Network, and 1.6.8 Parking.  The Land Development Code shall include alternatives to specific Traditional Neighborhood Development design standards consistent with the intent of those standards as appropriate,  for small parcels, institutional uses, and industrial uses; such alternatives shall also be provided for parcels that have unique characteristics such as environmental, physical or topographic constraints which preclude strict adherence to the generally required standards.  In addition, notwithstanding minimum parcel size requirements per Policy 1.6.1 of this Element, all development shall have the option of developing as a Traditional Neighborhood Development consistent with Future Land Use Element Objective 1.6 and its policies.

Policy 7.1.34   The following thresholds for development design requirements and locational standards shall apply within the Urban Cluster:

(a)         All commercial development or redevelopment on 25 developable acres or more in size shall be developed as either a Traditional Neighborhood Development or Transit Oriented Development in accordance with all requirements of Objective 1.6 or 1.7 and their policies.

(b)         Developments within Urban Residential designations that are:

(1)         150 or more units and are contiguous to a Rapid Transit or Express Transit Corridor shall be either a Traditional Neighborhood Development, Transit Oriented Development or located within an Activity Center.

(2)         300 or more units shall be either a Traditional Neighborhood Development or located within an Activity Center.

Policy 7.1.35   Development or redevelopment in the Urban Cluster that is contiguous with a rapid or express transit corridor and exceeds 1,000 dwelling units or 350,000 sq ft of non-residential shall be developed as a Transit Oriented Development (TOD) consistent with Future Land Use Element Objective 1.7 and its policies.

Policy 7.1.36   To encourage infill development, redevelopment and integration of existing development within a proposed development plan, buildings existing as of July 1st, 2010, at the discretion of the developer, may be excluded from or included in the calculation of the thresholds provided in Policy 7.1.35 of this Element and Policy 1.1.10.3 of the Transportation Mobility Element.  

8.0 SPECIAL AREA STUDIES

 

OBJECTIVE 8.1 -  SPECIAL AREA STUDY ‑ NORTH MAIN STREET

A Special Area Study is established at North Main Street and N.W. 53rd Avenue which shall be subject to the policies and standards contained in this section.

Policy 8.1.1      General

Policy 8.1.1.1  The Future Activity Center located at North Main Street and N.W. 53rd Avenue shall be removed from the Land Use Plan Map.

Policy 8.1.2      Land Use

Policy 8.1.2.1  No development order shall be issued unless a master stormwater management plan affecting the property in question has been approved.  Stormwater management plans shall include provisions for implementation, and shall address responsibilities for funding and maintenance of system improvements.  Where parcels are to be divided or sold, covenants shall be submitted and approved showing the assignment of implementation responsibilities.

Policy 8.1.2.2  The density or intensity of use of any parcel may be modified as necessary to accommodate limitations imposed by stormwater management and/or the approved stormwater management plan.

Policy 8.1.2.3  Land uses and stormwater management shall provide that improvements and water quality meet all applicable federal, state, regional, water management district and local standards.

Policy 8.1.2.4  Land uses shall be generally distributed as described on the North Main Street Special Area Study Map.

Policy 8.1.2.5  The N.E. 39th Avenue and North Main Street low activity center boundaries shall be adjusted consistent with the Special Area Study Map.

OBJECTIVE 8.2 -   SPECIAL AREA STUDY ‑ CROSS CREEK VILLAGE

A Special Area Study is established for Cross Creek Village, which shall be subject to the policies and standards contained in this section.

Policy 8.2.1      GENERAL CONCEPT: This Special Area Study establishes general policies and development guidelines for the Cross Creek Village consistent with its status as a rural cluster under the County's adopted Comprehensive Plan, with special recognition of the unique environmental, cultural, and historical conditions of the area as well as the special opportunities existing within Cross Creek.

Policy 8.2.2      Except where specifically modified by the policies in this section, all policies of the Comprehensive Plan shall be applicable within the study area. The study area shall be considered a rural cluster under the provision of Section 6.0; however, the boundaries of the area and the policies affecting land within the study area shall be as set forth in this section. These policies have been designed for the unique land use requirements of the Cross Creek Area.

Generally, two sets of policies shall apply to decisions affecting the Study Area:

(a)         "Village Center Development Area" and "Village Periphery Development Area" policies; as set out in subsection 8.2.2 below; and,

(b)         "Resource Protection Area" policies, including: Wetlands, Exceptional Upland Habitats, Hammocks, Active Use Zone, Lake Buffer Areas, Historic Preservation Areas, Bald Eagle Nesting Areas and Water Quality Policies; as set forth in subsection 8.2.3. below. Development regulations for the Cross Creek Special Study Area are set out in a separate Ordinance in the County's Development Regulations.

To help with the identification of the various areas described above, Cross Creek Village Plan maps are attached hereto as Exhibit "A" and, by this reference, made a part hereof.* Because these maps show the general location, character, and extent of environmental and other features important for use in interpreting the policies contained in this section, actual field investigations may be necessary on a case‑by‑case basis to determine the exact location of features and to establish the effect of these policies and development regulations on any particular property in question.

(c)         The policies and guidelines herein shall guide development decision making within the Study Area. Where these policies or specific standards in the development regulations conflict with general policies in the remainder of the Plan, or with the generally applicable development regulations, the more stringent policies and regulations apply. It is further the intent of this Special Area Study that the policies and guidelines recognize the importance of this rural agricultural community, existing land uses, building, and structures and validly existing rights of property owners. It is further the intent that future development in this area be consistent with policies recognizing the importance of resource protection areas and the importance of proper stormwater management, land, and water management associated with future development in the Study Area.

Policy 8.2.3      DEVELOPMENT AREAS: For the purpose of this Special Area Study, two areas are defined on the Village Plan maps ‑ the Village Center Development Area and the Village Periphery Development Area. The purpose of this section is to describe the intended character of each of these. Additional policies, set forth in later subsections are applicable within each of these areas.

Policy 8.2.3.1  VILLAGE CENTER DEVELOPMENT AREA: The Village Center Development Area includes the most intensely developed areas within the Cross Creek Special Study Area. The Village Center Development Area extends approximately 1/2 mile north and south of the Cross Creek Bridge, the focal point of the Cross Creek rural cluster. See map of the Village Center Development Area, Exhibit C, attached hereto and by this reference made a part hereof.

Approximately 72 percent of all recorded parcels in the Cross Creek Study Area are located in the Village Center Development Area. This area contains all of the subdivisions in Cross Creek as well as most commercial and tourist entertainment uses. While the Village Center contains 72 percent of all parcels, it comprises only 28 percent of the total land in the study area. Village Center Development Area policies are designed to ensure that the most intense development continues to occur in the village center. The following policies shall apply to development in this area:

(a)         Residential uses, including single family residences and single family mobile homes are appropriate for the Village Center. Other residential development shall be limited to group home uses and other uses consistent with the general policies in the Comprehensive Plan.

(b)         Commercial and retail development should locate in close proximity to the Cross Creek Bridge, the focal point of the village. These uses shall primarily serve the market made up by the village of Cross Creek and shall be consistent with the general policies in the Comprehensive Plan. No commercial use shall be permitted in the historic preservation area of the Rawlings house in order to preserve the character of the area near the Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic Site.

(c)         Tourist/entertainment uses in the Village Center Development Area shall serve the transient population attracted to Cross Creek by the historic and cultural features, as well as by outdoor recreational opportunities. Generally, individual tourist and entertainment uses should be small in scale and should blend in with the character of the village. No tourist/ entertainment uses should be permitted in the historic preservation area of the Rawlings house in order to preserve the character of the area near the Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic Site.

Policy 8.2.3.2  VILLAGE PERIPHERY DEVELOPMENT AREA: The Village Periphery Development Area located both to the north and south of the Village Center, is a low density rural area. While the Village Periphery comprises almost 72 percent of the study area, it contains only 28 percent of the land parcels. Large lots, single family residential uses and agricultural uses are characteristic of the Village Periphery Development Area. Here the average parcel size is 23 acres compared to an average size of 3.5 acres in the Village Center.

Policies for the Village Periphery are designed to maintain this area as a low density rural community and to limit sprawl from the Village Center. Ideally, the Cross Creek Plan will result in a strengthening of the contrast between the compact style of the Village Center Development Area and the rural style of the Village Periphery Development Area, while at the same time allowing continuation of agricultural and large lot residential uses that have characterized past land use in this section of the study area. The following policies shall apply:

(a)         Appropriate residential uses in the Village Periphery Development Area include single family residential and single family mobile homes. Residential development in the Village Periphery should generally be at densities of one unit per five acres or less. However, in those instances where density is to be transferred from a resource protection area, higher densities may be allowed, up to a maximum of one unit per acre. Other residential uses, including multi-family, group facilities, and institutional residential uses are inappropriate.

(b)         Agriculture and forestry activities and limited accessory uses are appropriate, consistent with the character described above and with other policies in this Plan.

(c)         Commercial and tourist/entertainment uses, are inappropriate in the Village Periphery Development Area.

(d)         Future development shall be encouraged to locate away from County Road 325, in order to reduce the visibility of development from such road. In addition, future development shall minimize the number of roadway entrances to County Road 325.

(e)         All forestry activities shall be in accordance with Conservation and Open Space Element Objective 5.5.

Policy 8.2.4      RESOURCE PROTECTION POLICIES: The Cross Creek Special Study Area has been divided into four zones on the basis of a general characterization of land and vegetation type using physiographic and ecological criteria.  These zones or landscape types consist of wetlands, exceptional upland habitat, other forested uplands (hammock zone), and upland areas which have been cleared for agricultural or residential uses (active use zone).  In addition to the zones, three other resource areas have been identified and integrated into the special area study.  These three resource areas are the Lake Buffer Area, the Historic Preservation Area, and the Bald Eagle Nesting Areas.  Each zone or resource area has unique characteristics that can support various degrees of alteration and development.  At the same time, each requires special protective policies dictated by its unique characteristics.  This section presents policies to direct overall land use in the four zones and three resource areas. Specific standards to implement these policies and to guide development activities in these areas are set forth in the development regulations concerning this special area study.

Policy 8.2.4.1  Wetlands.  This zone represents wetlands and immediate shore‑zone areas.  A variety of interior ponds, swamps, bayheads, and flood prone pasture is also included.  Wetlands cover approximately 24 per‑cent of the study area. Preservation of the wetlands and adjacent shore zones of Orange Lake, Lochloosa Lake, and Cross Creek is essential to the maintenance of water quality and the exceptional wildlife of these Outstanding Florida Waters.  The following policies shall apply to all development proposals for this zone:

(a)        Wetlands in the study area should be conserved and protected from structural and hydrologic alteration so that their natural function in the landscape is maintained and enhanced.

(b)         These policies shall recognize the importance of identifying and preserving submerged lands in the wetland zone which are sovereign lands of the State.

Wetlands zone policies are implemented through the County's development regulations for Cross Creek which include reference to mapped areas, a requirement that wetlands be left undisturbed but with provisions for a gross density of 1 DU/5A, density transfers to contiguous property at a rate of 1 DU/5A and allowance of accessory uses such as boat docks by special use permit.

Policy 8.2.4.2  Exceptional Upland Habitat. This zone supports natural communities of high ecological value which exhibit a combination of significant natural, functional, and structural characteristics. These areas include large patches of relatively undisturbed associations of native vegetation which are key features of the landscape and ecosystem of the study area.  Exceptional upland habitat types identified within the study area consist of two forested communities, generally termed hammock and flatwoods.  This zone serves key habitat functions by providing linkage between other riparian habitats, as well as directly meeting the habitat requirements of many species native to the area.  Approximately 26 percent (822 acres) of the Study Area is comprised of Exceptional Upland Habitat.  The following policies shall apply to all development proposals for this zone:

(a)         Alachua County shall seek to preserve Exceptional Upland Habitat and natural communities in the Study Area and to ensure that the characteristics of those not preserved are conserved during the land development process.

(b)         The perpetuation and enhancement of the habitat values of Exceptional Upland Natural Communities shall receive primary consideration in reviewing development requests for this zone.

(c)         It shall be the policy of the County to discourage the removal of the existing indigenous vegetation of this zone.

Exceptional Upland Habitats Zone policies are implemented through the County's development regulations for Cross Creek which include references to mapped areas, restrictions on development for the important animal habitat this zone provides with provision for residential densities of 1 DU/5A with a building impact area of no more than one acre and density transfers to contiguous property at a rate of 2 DU/5A.

Policy 8.2.4.3  Hammocks. This Zone represents that portion of the Cross Creek area which retains a predominance of the natural hammock vegetation.  These areas provide wildlife habitat of a generally lesser value than exceptional uplands or wetlands areas and act as a transitional zone between conservation areas and developed areas.  Hammocks cover approximately 13 percent (419 acres) of the Study Area.  See attached maps.  The following policies shall apply to all development proposals in this zone.

(a)         Future land use in the hammock zone be managed to achieve a transition between the more highly developed active use zone and the less intensely developed wetland and exceptional upland habitats.

(b)         The retention of native vegetation shall be encouraged in this zone, with emphasis on maintaining and enhancing the tree canopy.

Hammock zone policies are implemented through the County's development regulations for Cross Creek which include references to mapped areas, protection of areas with a predominance of hammock vegetation but with a maximum gross residential density of 1 DU/2A in the Village Center area with building impact limited to 1/2 acre and an option to cluster, a maximum gross density of 1 DU/5A in the Village Periphery Area with maximum building impact area of 1 acre.  Density transfers may be made to contiguous property at a rate of 2 DU/5A.

Policy 8.2.4.4  Active Use Zone.  This Zone contains the land which has been most significantly altered from its natural state and is also the predominant zone in the study area, comprising over 37 percent (1154 acres) of the total area. See attached maps.  Within the Village Center, this zone supports the development that is the community of Cross Creek.  Within the Village Periphery, this zone supports much of the agricultural activity that gives this area its rural character.  These areas have relatively little ecological value and are the areas which should be the focus of future development.  The active use zone shall be the preferred location for all future development in the Special Study Area.

Active Use Zone policies are implemented through the development regulations for Cross Creek.  The zone allows a maximum residential density of 2 DU/A in the Village Center area with a building impact limited to 1/2 acre and a maximum 1 DU/5A in the Village Periphery with an optional cluster.

Policy 8.2.4.5  Lake Buffer Area.  A Lake Buffer Area shall be maintained for identification and proper management of the area landward from the jurisdictional line for demarcation of the landward extent of Waters of the State.  Development regulations will provide limited uses for this area. The removal of vegetation and trees from the Lake Buffer Area should be discouraged in order to prevent pollution, erosion, maintain habitat for bald eagles and other wildlife, and preserve the aesthetic values associated with the lakes.  The landward extent of the Lake Buffer Area shall be determined on a case‑by‑case basis prior to future development approval by utilizing the criteria and methodology set forth in the development regulations.

Lake Shore buffer zone policies are implemented through the County's development regulations for Cross Creek. Buffers shall be consistent with the requirements of Conservation and Open Space Element Policy 3.6.8.  Density transfers may be made to contiguous property at a rate of 2 DU/5A.

Policy 8.2.4.6  Historic Preservation Area.  Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, one of Florida's most famous writers, wrote extensively about the character of Cross Creek. That character, developed by Rawlings over three decades and described in her work, still exists today and is an important resource in the Cross Creek area. It includes the people, the houses, and the natural resources. These policies shall apply to all development proposals in the historic preservation area of the Rawlings House Property, a National Historic Site (See Map 15).  A Historic Preservation Area shall be established in development regulations for land in the vicinity of the Rawlings House Property. The integrity of the historic and cultural resources of Cross Creek should be preserved.

Policy 8.2.4.7  Bald Eagle Nesting Areas.

(a)         The land surrounding Orange, Lochloosa, and Newnan’s lakes comprises one of 16 core nesting areas for bald eagles in Florida.  The intent of the following policies is to ensure compliance with all federal and state bald eagle regulations, guidelines and management plans.  It is the further intent of these policies to foster an environment that maintains a stable or increasing population of bald eagles within the study area.  The strategy is to avoid and minimize adverse, human-related impacts on bald eagles by maintaining buffers from incompatible land uses and activities of up to 660 feet from nests, particularly during the nesting season (October 1 to May 15).

(b)         The Bald Eagle Management Plan is intended to be compatible with the National Bald Eagle Management Guidelines. The County shall rely on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) National Bald Eagle Management Guidelines and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Bald Eagle Management Plan for guidance in avoiding and minimizing adverse impacts to bald eagles and bald eagle habitat in and adjacent to the Special Area Study. In the event that federal and state guidelines/management plan provisions cannot be reconciled, the more restrictive provisions shall prevail.

(c)         The location of new bald eagle nests in the Study Area shall not affect existing land use(s), building(s), or structure(s) of the affected landowner(s), and the location and extent of buffer zones for new nest sites may be modified on a case-by-case basis, consistent with existing land use(s), building(s), or structure(s).

(d)         For new development, expansion of existing development, and other development activities within 660 feet of active or alternate bald eagle nests: FWC Eagle Management Guidelines are standards identified in the Bald Eagle Management Plan that, when followed, are presumed not to result in adverse impacts. Adherence to those guidelines shall satisfy County requirements for eagle protection. Alternatively, if FWC Management Guidelines cannot be met, a FWC permit, or other authorization by FWC, shall be required as a condition to Development Review Committee (DRC), Building Permit, or administrative approval, as applicable, and shall also satisfy County requirements for eagle protection.

Policy 8.2.4.8  Water Quality. 

Special consideration should be given to the unique condition of Orange and Lochloosa Lakes and Cross Creek, and, in particular, to the sensitivity of these waters to the effects of nutrient pollution.  The County recognizes the addition of Orange Lake, Lochloosa Lake, Cross Creek, and the River Styx to the list of Outstanding Florida Waters (OFWs).  The County shall rely on the rules and regulations promulgated by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection for Outstanding Florida Waters to maintain water quality in the study area.

OBJECTIVE 8.3 -   SPECIAL AREA STUDY ‑ WALDO/301

A Special Area Study is established for the County/301 area, which shall be subject to the policies and standards contained in this Section.

Policy 8.3.1      GENERAL PROVISIONS: The provisions of the adopted Plan shall prevail except where specifically modified by this Section.  The boundaries of this special area study shall be as set forth on the Waldo/301 Special Area Study Map.

Policy 8.3.2      Land Uses

Policy 8.3.2.1  Areas described on the attached map as "flood prone" and all areas meeting the definition of "conservation area" pursuant to the Future Land Use Element and/or the Conservation and Open Space Element shall be subject to the development limitations set forth in the Conservation and Open Space Element.  Development of such areas for industrial or commercial uses is not appropriate. Development of residential uses in these areas should be limited to the densities established in the Future Land Use Element and all applicable policies of the Conservation and Open Space Element. Where the presence of conservation areas is indicated, a field investigation shall be required to determine the actual boundaries of the areas within which development is to be restricted. Where such areas appear to be as marginally environmentally sensitive as to prevent the reasonable use of land, the Board of County Commissioners may permit modifications to the boundaries of said areas. In so doing, the Board shall consider the degree to which the proposed modifications will interfere with the natural drainage systems, the ability of the natural flood storage system to operate, and any adverse impacts on significant wetland ecosystems which might result.

Policy 8.3.2.2  Other property within the study area may be considered appropriate for designation as a "Rural Employment Center." Land uses should be reviewed according to the provisions of Section 6.3.  The primary focus of development should be on industrial and employment uses, as well as tourist/entertainment uses (see Section 3.10 of the Future Land Use Element), except tourist/entertainment uses shall not be permitted in the approximate 29 acres of the Special Area Study designated on the Waldo/301 Special Area Study Map around the intersection of US 301, County Road 1471 (previously CR NE 11) and County Road 1469 (NE 114th Avenue).  Significant retail activities are not consistent with the Plan's intent for the study area, however minor retail commercial activities intended primarily to service industrial uses and the rural service area are appropriate. Residential development within the study area shall conform to the policies for Rural Employment Centers and Rural Clusters.

Policy 8.3.2.3  Any new non-residential development or any expansion of an existing non-residential development shall be subject to site plan review.  Such expansion of existing non-residential development shall not exceed twenty-five (25) percent of the existing level of intensity or use.  At the time of site plan approval, the Board of County Commissioners may require perimeter buffers and/or landscaping and reduction in signage (both number and area of signs) to meet County ordinances and/or Plan standards applicable to new development.

Policy 8.3.3      Transportation

Policy 8.3.3.1  Access to U.S. 301 shall be limited to one driveway not exceeding forty (40) feet in width every 200 feet, provided that each lot or parcel of land existing at the time of the adoption of this amendment shall be permitted at least one entrance (two if the parcel is over 500 feet in width). It is the intent of this Section that driveways be shared between adjoining parcels (particularly between parcels less than 150 feet in width), and that corner lots have their primary access from the side street.

Policy 8.3.3.2  At the time of site plan review for any expansion of development, the Board of County Commissioners may require a reduction in the number and/or width of driveways and the relocation of existing driveways to better meet the provisions of the previous subsection.

Policy 8.3.4      Community Facilities

Policy 8.3.4.1  Extension of water and sewer service to serve this Rural Employment Center is encouraged. Extensions beyond the study area are not encouraged, however, and should be reviewed according to the policies contained in the Potable Water and Sanitary Sewer Element.

Policy 8.3.5      The Waldo/301 Special Area Study shall be reevaluated.  At a minimum, such reevaluation shall include consideration of a statement of the goals and intent of the special area study, success of the special area study in dealing with development issues within the study area, and the feasibility or appropriateness of expanding the concept of the study area to facilitate development of a U.S. 301 corridor study and plan through additional areas of the County.

OBJECTIVE 8.4 -   SPECIAL AREA STUDY ‑ IDYLWILD/SERENOLA

A Special Area Study is established for the Idylwild/Serenola area which shall be subject to the policies and standards contained in this Section.

Policy 8.4.1      GENERAL: The Special Area Study is established to develop specific guidelines for the area identified as Idylwild/Serenola, generally bounded by Archer Road to the north, Gainesville City limits to the east, Paynes Prairie to the south and east, and SW 34th Street and Interstate 75 to the west. To help with identification of the area and specific areas described herein, an Idylwild/Serenola Special Study Area map, designated Map 2, is incorporated by reference in this Section.  Except where specifically modified by the policies herein, all policies of the Plan shall be applicable within the study area. Where the specific policies conflict with general policies in the remainder of the plan, the policies herein shall prevail.

Goal: Environmental Resources

Policy 8.4.2      It is the goal of this Special Area Study to conserve, manage, and restore or enhance the natural and cultural resources of the Idylwild/Serenola neighborhood, to ensure long‑term environmental quality for the future. To help with the general identification of some of the specific areas described herein, an Environmental Resources Map, designated Map 2.a., is adopted.

Objective: Significant Natural Upland Communities

Policy 8.4.2.1  To preserve and conserve significant uplands, policies (a) through (c) below shall apply.

Significant uplands are defined as forested upland communities (associations) of plants and animals, which, because of their great variety of species are deemed to be of exceptional quality and richness (community completeness). These habitats are typically of sufficient size to maintain normal flora and fauna have actual or potential linkages to other significant natural areas and contain sufficient diversity among species and communities.

 

(a)         Preservation of upland communities shall be encouraged through public/private acquisition where possible, and other appropriate methods of preservation.

(b)     Appropriate conservation strategies shall be developed and utilized to permit appropriate development where preservation cannot be accomplished. These development regulations are addressed in the Conservation and Open Space Element.

(c)         Criteria for the conservation of significant uplands shall be developed and included as a part of the development review process.

Objective: Tree Canopy Areas

Policy 8.4.2.2  To preserve, maintains, and restore where necessary, areas containing extensive tree canopies, policies (a) and (b) below shall apply. Tree canopy areas are major existing areas containing a significant population of trees of a size and condition to be considered a resource.

(a)         The development regulations shall require a tree survey be submitted for all development proposed within designated "Tree Canopy Areas". The survey shall be submitted at the time of development application.

(b)         Development within Tree Canopy Areas shall utilize "cluster" design concepts, concentrating development within given areas to eliminate or minimize the impact of the proposed development. The development regulations shall provide for appropriate mitigation, if necessary.

Objective: Active Use Residential Zones

Policy 8.4.2.3  To maintain developable or already developed lots in as much of a natural state as possible, the following policy shall apply in the active use residential zones. The active use residential zones contain the densely tree‑canopied, developed areas of the Idylwild, Serenola, and Malore Gardens neighborhoods.

(a)         Innovative lot designs shall be encouraged through flexibility in the development regulations to maintain the natural character of the individual lots within designated "Active Use Residential Areas".

Objective: Paynes Prairie

Policy 8.4.2.4  To conserve, preserves, and maintains the character of Paynes Prairie, policies (a) and (b) below shall apply.  Paynes Prairie is an extensive State Preserve area of approximately 18,000 acres extending around the eastern and southern portion of the Study Area.

(a)         The removal of natural vegetation and trees adjacent to Paynes Prairie shall be prohibited in an effort to prevent erosion, maintain habitat, and preserve aesthetic values of Paynes Prairie. Specific development regulations shall be adopted which provide for the appropriate buffers adjacent to the Prairie. The development regulations shall establish a minimum buffer westward and northward of Paynes Prairie State Preserve and landward from the jurisdictional line for demarcation of waters of the State.

(b)         Natural drainage and surface water runoff into Paynes Prairie shall not be altered where possible. Where alteration is necessary the water treatment and flood control characteristics shall be maintained or enhanced.

Objective: Scenic Roads 

Policy 8.4.2.5  To preserve the natural, historical, and aesthetic value of scenic roads, policies (a) through (c) below shall apply. Crown Road (56th Avenue and 17th Terrace) within the Study Area has been identified by Alachua County as a scenic road having historic or cultural significance and/or natural beauty.

(a)         Scenic roads shall not be altered unless the health, safety, and welfare of the community are jeopardized.

(b)       Development activities occurring along scenic roads shall be consistent with the Scenic Road Ordinance of Alachua County.

(c)         Development regulations shall be prepared which establish limitations on development adjacent to scenic roads.

Objective: Listed Species

Policy 8.4.2.6  To protect listed species through habitat maintenance and appropriate development regulations, policies (a) through (c) below shall apply.

(a)         Policies within the Conservation and Open Space Element shall apply as they relate to listed species.

(b)         Listed species shall be afforded the legal protective status provided by law.

(c)         Land development regulations provide specific direction for protection of areas occupied by listed species and areas immediately adjacent thereto. These provisions include standards to eliminate or minimize adverse impact on those species and their habitat.

Objective: Archeologically Significant Areas

Policy 8.4.2.7  Individual sites and areas of archeological significance shall be preserved, protected, or acquired, and wherever possible, enhanced. Policies (a) through (d) below shall apply to archeologically significant areas.

(a)         The relocation of construction sites which coincide spatially with identified historical and archeological sites shall be encouraged.

(b)         The development regulations shall establish minimum buffer areas around known archeologically significant areas.

(c)         Alachua County shall develop a program of seeking all federal, state, and private funds in order to perform a systematic survey for archeological and historical sites.

(d)         Alachua County shall address Archeological and Historic Preservation as part of its Comprehensive Plan.

Goal: Land Use

Policy 8.4.3      It is the goal of this Special Area Study to encourage the orderly, harmonious, and judicious use of land to preserve the natural environmental features, existing residential areas, and historic and cultural resources.

                             Objectives: Land Use

Policy 8.4.3.1  The objectives of the policies in Section 8.4.3.2. are:

(a)         To protect existing residential neighborhoods from encroachment of incompatible land uses.

(b)         To promote compatible land uses on adjacent properties.

(c)         To encourage the type and intensity of land uses that is consistent with and compatible with the natural characteristics of the land.

Policies: Land Use

Policy 8.4.3.2  The policies governing land use in the special area study are as follows:

(a)         The Future Land Use Map, designated Map 2, indicating future densities and land uses, is incorporated herein.

(b)         The natural constraints of the land shall be considered in light of any proposed development.

(c)         Residential properties located adjacent to single‑family residential neighborhoods should be developed at not higher than a two‑dwelling unit‑per‑acre increase in density above the density permitted on any of the adjacent zoned properties. Adjacent properties shall mean abutting properties or properties which are separated only by a private or County right‑of‑way or easement, but properties that are separated by an arterial road shall not be considered adjacent. Further increases may be permitted only for development shown to be sufficiently similar in character and intensity to existing uses so that compatibility is maintained. Techniques such as step‑up in residential density, buffers, setbacks, screening, and low‑intensity lighting between uses based on performance standards to be defined in the development regulations may be utilized to provide such compatibility.

(d)         Commercial development shall be required to locate within the boundaries of activity centers, except that commercial development shall be allowed within existing commercial nodes as defined by existing commercial zoned boundaries, consistent with the infill policies contained within the Comprehensive Plan.

(e)         Modify existing requirements for buffering to increase the effectiveness of transitions from one type of land use to another.

(f)          Identify environmentally sensitive areas as a Conservation Overlay. Specific regulations shall be adopted which provide protection for environmentally sensitive areas. Specific criteria, standards, and procedures should be identified for development requests including provisions such as appropriate setbacks, buffers, mitigation and restoration requirements and provision of natural open areas.

(g)         Provide for low density/intensity uses around environmentally sensitive areas such as Paynes Prairie.

(h)         Provide through the development regulations a manner to reevaluate proposed development which has not developed after a designated period of time.

Goal: Infrastructure

Policy 8.4.4      It is the goal of this Special Area Study to provide the necessary infrastructure to sustain and support development which maintains/enhances the quality of life within the neighborhood.

                             Objective: Roadway Network

Policy 8.4.4.1  To provide for safe movement of traffic within and through the neighborhood, while maintaining the unique characteristic of the scenic road, policies (a) through (d) below shall apply.

(a)         Monitor average daily traffic flow and peak hour traffic movements to allow easy identification of capacity problems or safety hazards.

(b)         Provide the appropriate connection of 35th Place between 34th Street and 23rd Terrace.

(c)         Maintain 56th Avenue and 17th Terrace as a scenic road.

(d)         Pave 35th Avenue when funding is available.

Objective: Water and Sewer

Policy 8.4.4.2  To provide for public water and centralized sewer system of adequate size and capacity to protect the sensitive environmental structure of the area, policies (a) through (e) below shall apply.

(a)         Extend existing public water lines to all existing and proposed development within the Idylwild/Serenola neighborhood, appropriately looped to enhance flow.

(b)         Extend centralized sanitary sewer facilities to all existing and proposed development.

(c)         Coordinate the extension of water and sewer facilities with the expansion of the GRU treatment plant.

(d)         Require all development to tie into the extended water and sewer lines when capacity is available.

(e)         Prohibit new development within the neighborhood unless it is connected to a public water supply and a centralized sewer facility unless:

(1)         the development is single family in nature; and

(2)         is being constructed on a lot of 3 acres or more; and

(3)         receives the appropriate permits for either well use and/or on‑site treatment.

(f)          Development regulations shall be written to address existing lots of less than three acres as provided for within the context of 8.4.4.2.(e).

Objective: Schools

Policy 8.4.4.3  To provide adequate school facilities to meet the needs of the neighborhood, policies (a) through (b) below shall apply

(a)         Establish an ongoing dialogue with the School Board to plan for adequate school facilities based on anticipated growth within the area.

(b)         Identify areas within the study area which may be suitable for acquisition and use for either an activity or resource‑based recreation facility.

Objective: Public Safety

Policy 8.4.4.4  To provide adequate public safety facilities to meet the needs of the neighborhood, policies (a) and (b) below shall apply.

(a)         Enhance the existing Police and Fire protection capability by tying unconnected streets together and paving appropriate roadways.

(b)         Monitor the volume of responses and travel time of the Police, Fire and EMS facilities to determine if additional staffing or units are necessary to meet the needs of the neighborhood.

OBJECTIVE 8.5 -   East Gainesville Urban Area

Alachua County has established a special area plan for the East Gainesville urban area. This plan was established in collaboration with the City of Gainesville and other stakeholders as part of the Plan East Gainesville process, and requires continuing collaboration with the City of Gainesville for part of its implementation.  Alachua County is committed to implementing the general vision of the plan – both long and short term, consistent with the implementation strategies outlined in the plan. The key elements of the County’s implementation strategy are captured in the following policies.

Policy 8.5.1      Map 16 (Figure A of Recommended Master Plan for Plan East Gainesville) is adopted as part of FLUE Map Series            to serve as a guiding vision for the East Gainesville urban area. The County shall promote economic opportunity through implementation of Plan East Gainesville, and sustainable development practices and design standards that support natural resources protection and energy efficiency.

Policy 8.5.2      As part of the County’s strategy to expand employment and eliminate disparities identified in BEBR’s 2018 study of Racial Inequity in Alachua County, infrastructure improvements that would facilitate development focused within the vicinity of the Eastside Activity Center shall be identified as part of a special area planning process.  The County shall continue to protect vital natural resources, such as wetlands, watersheds, significant habitat, strategic ecosystems, creeks, tree canopy, and scenic vistas that make East Gainesville unique.

Policy 8.5.3    TRANSPORTATION: Coordinate with the MTPO and the City of Gainesville to strengthen economic, social and transportation linkages and establish a Bus Rapid Transit system connecting east Gainesville with centers of employment and commerce including the areas of downtown, the University of Florida, and the western urban areas of unincorporated Alachua County.

Policy 8.5.4      HOUSING: Diversify housing choices in the area by creating incentives for more market rate housing through the County’s housing program such as State Housing Initiative Partnership (SHIP).  The County shall develop strategies to expand the range of housing choices to attract and retain residents with varied income levels.   

Policy 8.5.5       CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT: Assign priority, in County’s economic development budget, to capital improvement projects that enhance the East Gainesville urban area.

Policy 8.5.6      The County shall seek ways to increase economic opportunities by bringing sustainable and higher paying jobs and providing services.

Policy 8.5.7     The County shall promote and incentivize redevelopment of areas already in development or impacted by prior development.

Policy 8.5.8      The County shall continue to assist property owners and business interests within the East Gainesville urban area in achieving a balance of sustainable development and natural resource protection, including: actions to increase outreach and education about the value and benefits of natural resources within the community; clarifying the limitations and uses of available data and maps on the web; and stressing the value of ground-truthing (inspecting) of regulated resources on a development site prior to initiating the  development process.

9.0 TRANSFER OF DEVELOPMENT RIGHTS

OBJECTIVE 9.1 -   TRANSFER OF DEVELOPMENT RIGHTS PROGRAM

To create a tool that, in addition to other County policies and regulations, will protect the County’s environmental resources and promote viable agriculture and the rural landscape while encouraging efficient use of services and infrastructure by concentrating development in more suitable areas of the County.

Policy 9.1.1      Transfers of development rights may be proposed for two or more separate legally created parcels to facilitate transfers of development rights from regulated conservation and viable agriculture areas to areas within the Urban Cluster or potentially within other municipalities.

Policy 9.1.2      Sending Areas

(a)         Agricultural Sending Areas shall be defined as any legally created parcel or combination of contiguous parcels that meet the following criteria:

(1)         property has an approved agricultural classification from the Alachua County Property Appraiser;

(2)         property is located outside the Urban Cluster; and

(3)         property is 160 acres.

a.           An exception to the size threshold may be permitted where the property is determined to be contiguous to another designated sending area.

b.           An exception to the size threshold may be permitted where the property is determined by the County to be of exceptional agricultural value.

c.           No agricultural sending area property may be smaller than 40 acres in size.

(b)         Conservation Sending Areas shall be defined as any legally created parcel or combination of parcels that meet the following criteria:

(1)         property contains Strategic Ecosystems or is on the Alachua County Forever (ACF) active acquisition list; and

(2)         property is 160 acres.

a.           An exception to the size threshold may be permitted where the property is contiguous to an established Preservation area or designated sending area.

b.           An exception to the size threshold may be permitted where the property is determined by the County to be of exceptional conservation value based upon ground-truthing of the property.

c.           No conservation sending area property may be smaller than 40 acres.

(c)         Calculating Development Rights

(1)         Development rights available for transfer shall be equal to the lesser of the following, minus the residual units not to be included in the transfer:

a.           number of residential units otherwise allowed on the sending area property; or

b.           number of upland acres on the sending area property.

(2)         As an incentive to transfer development rights away from a sending property, a total of 2 development rights in addition to the number of rights granted through the calculations identified above are allowed, plus one additional right per every 10 acres of conservation area on site and one additional right per every 20 acres of non-conservation area on site, consistent with Policy 6.2.9 of this Element.

(d)         Residual Uses

(1)         Agriculture – Residential densities of up to one dwelling unit per 40 acres may be retained in the sending area and continuation of agricultural uses in accordance with the most recent best management practices (BMPs) adopted by the State. When mapped conservation areas are located on site, Conservation Sending Area residual guidelines apply.

(2)         Conservation – Residential densities of up to one dwelling unit per 200 acres may be retained on the sending parcel where consistent with a Conservation Management Plan.

a.           Higher densities of up to one dwelling unit per 40 acres may be proposed where it can be demonstrated that there is no impact on resource protection and where consistent with the Conservation Area Management Plan.

b.           The amount of density to be retained shall be based on what is necessary to protect the integrity of the ecological system and conservation resources.

c.           Continuation of agricultural uses is allowed in accordance with the most recent best management practices (BMPs) adopted by the State.

d.           Residual units shall be developed in a clustered pattern, when necessary, to protect the integrity of the environmental resources on and adjacent to the site.

Policy 9.1.3        Receiving Areas

(a)         Receiving areas may be located within any of the municipalities in Alachua County through the establishment of interlocal agreements.

(b)         Any proposed amendment to expand the Urban Cluster must include a commitment to purchase development rights at a rate equivalent to the proposed increase in density or intensity in accordance with Policy 7.1.3(e) of this Element.

Policy 9.1.4      Program Administration

(a)         The County shall create and maintain a publicly accessible database of development rights.

(b)         Sending property owners shall record a conservation or agricultural easement on the sending parcel and commit to a County-sponsored rezoning of the parcel to a sending area zoning designation.

FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT DEFINITIONS

 

A/B street grid system:   A technique for improving the pedestrian design and continuity of mixed use areas. The A streets maintain complete pedestrian continuity through requirements for spatial definition of the street and are organized in a continuous network so that the pedestrian experience is uninterrupted.  The B streets group together necessary auto-oriented uses (e.g., parking lots, loading and service areas) rather than allow them to be dispersed throughout the site where they would disrupt pedestrian continuity.

Accessory Dwelling Unit:              An additional dwelling unit, including a separate entrance and permanent provisions for living, sleeping, eating, cooking and sanitation, attached or detached from the primary residential unit, on a single family lot.  Accessory dwelling units are subordinate in size, location and appearance to the primary unit.

Balanced Mixture of Uses:  A variety of uses coexisting in an area which provides for the daily needs of the community, including housing, retail, services, and social opportunities.

Charrette:  A collaborative process emphasizing two-way communication, where input from neighbors, development professionals, and administrators is assembled as part of the conceptual design process.  Principle advantages are efficiency, and opportunity for consensus building and accurate response to problems and opportunities.

Civic Use:  Community functions including educational, cultural, social, service, and religious activities.

Cohesive Community:  A complete, compact, and orderly human environment which contains opportunities for meeting everyday needs through a variety of choices. Its smallest manifestation is the Neighborhood.

Connectivity:  An interlinked system of transportation paths providing multiple routes, based on principles of efficient land use and transportation infrastructure, convenient access to a mix of uses, transportation options, and human-scale design.

Corridors:  Linear regional connectors, including transportation and natural linkages.

Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED)  A crime prevention philosophy based on the theory that proper design and effective use of the built environment can lead to a reduction in the fear and incidence of crime, as well as an improvement in the quality of life.  Principles include Territoriality (improving sense of ownership) and Natural Surveillance (creating opportunities for “eyes on the street”).

Density Gradient:  A progressive, orderly transition in concentration of development over a given area.

Developed Recreation Facilities designed to provide for active recreation as their primary use, including swimming pools, playing fields, paved courts and skating areas, etc.

Districts:  An urbanized area that consists of a specialized set of activities that cannot be incorporated into the neighborhood structure.

Environmental Justice   No group of people, including a racial, ethnic, or socioeconomic group, should bear a disproportionate share of the cumulative negative social or environmental consequences resulting from land use decisions.

Equitably Served (Automobile and Non-Automobile Transportation)  Development that provides for safe and comfortable routes to coexist for autos, bicycles, and pedestrians, and does not advantage one transportation mode over another. Measures include automobile traffic calming, wide, shaded, and  uninterrupted sidewalks, bicycle lanes, curb ramps for sidewalks at intersections, and adequate, secure bicycle parking.  See also Multi-Modal Corridor.

Gated Access:  A physical barrier intended to deny or restrict public access.

Greenway/Open Space Corridor   A protected generally linear open space that is managed for conservation and/or recreation.

Green Roof:  A roof of a building that is partially or completely covered with vegetation and a growing medium, planted over a waterproofing membrane. It may also include additional layers such as a root barrier and drainage and irrigation systems (also see Energy Element Definitions).

Infill:  Development or redevelopment of property surrounded by existing development.

Jobs-Housing Balance:  Provision of employment choices in reasonable proximity to adequate and affordable housing to ensure efficiency of the transportation system, by bringing jobs and workers in a given context area into numerical balance, usually at somewhere between 1.3 and 1.7 jobs per household.

Large Scale Nonresidential Establishment:    Large commercial, institutional, or other nonresidential establishment often scaled and designed primarily for automobile convenience and access, and generally characterized by a lack of human scaled elements and detail. Also ‘Big box’.

Liner Building:   An architectural technique of incorporating pedestrian scale frontage buildings onto the facade of large scale retail structures in order to integrate with mixed use, multi-modal centers.

Hazard Resilient Land Planning:  Land use planning process that includes suitability analysis for development of land exposed to natural hazards, so the limitations of hazard prone areas are understood by citizens, potential investors, and government officials.  The plan results in a linkage of land-use and emergency planning efforts.

Low Impact Design (LID):   See Stormwater Management Element Definitions.

Multi-Modal Transportation:   Transportation system allowing a range of transportation options, such as automobile, pedestrian, bicycle, and public transportation, with infrastructure to carry out these options.

Multi-Modal Corridor:    A route designed to allow a range of transportation options.  Streets designed with many different users in mind encourage non-motorist travel, bettering the health of the community and making it more livable.  Multi-modal design includes connectivity requirements, the concept of shared street space, narrow street standards, mapped pedestrian and bicycle networks, lower speed limits, and corner bulb-outs.

Neighborhoods:   Area that meets a balanced range of human needs.  The basic component of community design.

Neighborhood Center:   Concentrated, limited scale facilities designed as a community focal point and accessible to dwellings, providing choices as to school, shopping and recreation. Not necessarily at the geographic center of the neighborhood.

Organizing Element:  A design feature that orders the physical aspect of development, including building types, transportation corridors, open space, facades, and streetscapes.

Outdoor recreation:  Outdoor recreation uses include public or private golf courses, tennis courts, ball courts, ball fields and similar outdoor sports and uses that are not in enclosed buildings. This shall also include any accessory uses, such as snack bars, pro shops, clubhouses, country clubs, maintenance buildings or similar uses that are designed and intended primarily for the use of patrons of the principal recreational use or for the maintenance and servicing of the facilities. This definition shall not include entertainment and recreation uses such as amusement parks, miniature golf, race car tracks or motocross facilities or similar motorized sports.

Park-once Environment:  Pedestrian-friendly development where it is possible, after parking, to conveniently and comfortably walk between destinations in the development, rather than drive.

Pedestrian Friendly:  A quality of access that includes a logical, unobstructed, comfortable path to a useful destination along frontages that are spatially defined and interesting, and safe from traffic. The destination should be generally accessible within a 5 minute walk, but may be longer if the path is divided into several short trips.

Personal Wireless Services:  Any personal wireless service defined in the Federal Telecommunications Act which includes Federal Communications Commission (FCC) licensed commercial  wireless  telecommunications services including cellular, personal communications services (PCS), specialized mobile radio (SMR), enhanced specialized mobile radio (ESMR), paging  as well as unlicensed wireless services, and common carrier wireless exchange access services.

Personal Wireless Service Facility (PWSF):  Facility for the provision of personal wireless services, as defined by Section 704 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996.  A PWSF is any facility for the transmission and/or reception of personal wireless services, which may consist of an antenna array, transmission cables, equipment shelter or building, access road, mount, and a guy system.

Prime Agricultural Soils: soils delineated by the United States Department of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA- NRCS) according to the criteria established in Section 657.5 of the Code of Federal Regulations (7CFR657.5).  At the adoption of this plan this delineation includes the following soil types:  Norfolk Map Units #33 B and C (digital map units #33 and #78), and Micanopy Map Unit #57(drained) (digital map unit #57).

Public utility (electric, gas, telephone and cable):   Every person, corporation, partnership, association, or other legal entity and their lessees, trustees, or receivers, whether or not owned, controlled, or operated by a public entity,  supplying electricity,  gas (natural, manufactured, or similar gaseous substance), telephone, or cable to or for the public.

Research and Development: Activities undertaken to create new or improved products and processes and consists of basic scientific research, prototyping, testing and refining products prior to commercial sale or use and may be conducted by individuals, corporations, or institutions.

Resource-based recreation: Recreational activities that are essentially dependent upon the natural, scenic, or historic resources of the area provided the associated activities do not have significant adverse impacts on the ecological integrity or ecological or historical values of the resources in these areas.

Sensitive Karst Areas (SKAs):  see Stormwater Management Element Definitions.

Social Equity:   Principle of fairness, with attention to provision of opportunity to those portions of the community that are less well off; as applied to Comprehensive Plan, related issues include the provision of affordable housing, economic opportunity, and choice of living environments for all members of the community without regard to sex, race, age, religion, ethnicity, national origin, etc.

Subdivision:   The division of land into three or more lots, parcels, tracts, tiers, blocks, sites, units, or any other division of land; and includes establishment of new streets and alleys, additions, and resubdivisions; and, when appropriate to the context, relates to the process of subdividing or to the lands or area subdivided.

Sustainable Development:  A strategy by which a community can use resources efficiently, create efficient infrastructure, protect and enhance quality of life, and create new businesses to strengthen its economy.

Traditional Neighborhood Development (TND):   A distinct type of mixed use development that meets specific standards and criteria, including mixture and scale of uses, compact design, and walkability.

Transfer of Development Rights:  A method for protecting rural or environmentally sensitive land by sale or conveyance of the rights to develop from one area (a sending area) to another area (a receiving area).

Transit:   Passenger services provided by public, private, or non-profit entities such as the following surface transit modes: commuter rail, rail rapid transit, light rail transit, light guideway transit, express bus, and local fixed route bus or passenger vans operating on a demand responsive basis and associated park and ride facilities.  This definition applies where the term public transit or mass transit is used in the Plan.

Urban Activity Center:  Area designated on the Future Land Use Map  where higher intensity and density land uses are concentrated.

Urban Cluster: An area designated on the Future Land Use Map for urban development, which includes residential densities ranging from one unit per acre to 24 units per acre or greater, non-residential development, and is generally served by urban services.

Usable Open Space: Walkable outdoor area designed or used for public access, outdoor living, recreation or pedestrian access. 

Viable soils and effective land masses:   A combination of soils having favorable physical and chemical characteristics with amounts of contiguous land that enables sustained commercial cultivation,  management,  and yields of specific crops, including vegetables, field crops, and silviculture.

Village Center:   Neighborhood scale, compact, mixed use areas, integrated into residential areas within the Urban Cluster through specific site and design standards.

Vista:  A view to a destination created or afforded by the linear perspective of an avenue, street, or other public passage.

FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT MAP SERIES

 

a.           Future Land Use Map 2040 Alachua County

b.           Transportation Mobility Districts

c.           Express Transit Corridors

d.           Rapid Transit Corridors

e.           Wetlands and Floodplains

f.            Activity Center/Special Area Study Maps

1.           Archer Road/SW 34th Street Activity Center/Retail and Special Area Study

2.           Idylwild/Serenola Special Area Study Future Land Use (Objective 8.4)

              Williston Road/I-75 Low Employment Low Activity Center

              Williston Road/SW 13th Street Low Activity Center

2a.         Idylwild/Serenola Environmental Resources Special Area Map

3.           Tower Road/24th Avenue Low Activity Center/Employment

4.           Archer Road/Tower Road Low-Medium Activity Center/Retail

5.           Jonesville Low Activity Center/Employment

6.           Millhopper Medium Activity Center

7.           North Main Street/NE 53rd Avenue Activity Center

8.           Reserved

9.           Oaks Mall High Activity Center/Retail

10.         Santa Fe Community College Low Activity Center

11.         Springhills High Activity Center/Retail

12.         Eastside Medium Activity Center/Mixed Use

12a.       Eastside Medium Activity Center Community Facilities Map

13.         Waldo Special Area Study Map 1

13a.       Waldo Special Area Study Map 2

14.         North Main Street Special Area Study

15.         Cross Creek Special Area Study

16.         Plan East Gainesville ‘Figure A’:  Recommended Master Plan (Special Area Plan)




Map a. Future Land Use Map 2040 Alachua County




Map b. Transportation Mobility Districts




Map c. Express Transit Corridors




Map d. Rapid Transit Corridors




Map e. Wetlands and Floodplains




Map F1. Archer Road/SW 34th Street Activity Center/Retail and Special Area Study




Map F2. Idylwild/Serenola Special Area Study; Williston/I-75 and Williston/SW 13th St. Activity Centers




Map F2a. Idylwild Serenola Special Area Study, Environmental Resources




Map F3. Tower Road/24th Avenue Activity Center




Map F4. Archer Road/Tower Road Activity Center




Map F5. Jonesville Activity Center




Map F6. Millhopper Activity Center




Map F7. North Main Street/NE 53rd Avenue Activity Center




Map F8. Reserve




Map F9. Oaks Mall Activity Center




Map F10. Santa Fe Community College Activity Center




Map F11. Springhills Activity Center




Map F12. East Side Activity Center




Map F12a. Eastside Activity Center Community Facilities




Map F13. Waldo Special Area Study Map 1




Map F13. Waldo Special Area Study Map 2




Map F14. North Main Street Special Area Study




Map F15. Cross Creek Special Area Study




Map F16. Plan East Gainesville ‘Figure A’: Recommended Master Plan (Special Area Plan)






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